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OpenELEC 5.0 Beta 2 Is a Bleeding Edge Distro That Runs on Almost Any Hardware

Filed under
GNU
Linux

OpenELEC, an embedded operating system built specifically to run the Kodi media player solution and to work on most devices, has been updated yet again in the course of just one week.

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Digitimes Research: Lenovo, Asustek to launch US$149 Chromebook

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Lenovo and Asustek are expected to release Chromebooks using Google-certified solutions from China-based Rockchip in the first half of 2015 at the latest, and their devices are expected to be priced at US$149, a new low for notebook products, according to Digitimes Research's latest finding from the Greater China supply chain.

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Intel Updates Its Linux Graphics Installer For Ubuntu 14.04 & Fedora 20

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

This week Intel updated its Linux Graphics Installer for Fedora 20 and Ubuntu 14.04, but as usual, it's really nothing too special and doesn't earn my high recommendation as there's better ways for users to be running the latest open-source graphics code.

The Intel Linux Graphics Installer 1.0.7 release makes it easy to deploy their "2014Q3 Linux Graphics Stack" on the 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Fedora 20 and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. The 2014Q3 stack is defined as the Linux 3.16.2 kernel, Mesa 10.3, xf86-video-intel 2.99.911, libdrm 2.4.56, libva 1.4.0, and X.Org Server 1.16.0. These software components have been talked about for a long while already on Phoronix.

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Scientific Linux 6.6 Released As RHEL 6.6 Spin

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

For those currently bound to the RHEL6 series rather than the newer RHEL7 series and use Scientific Linux to avoid the associated Red Hat costs, Scientific Linux 6.6 is now available.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.6 was released last month with performance improvements and enhancements to system administration and virtualization in particular. Nearly one month later, Scientific Linux 6.6 is out as its take on RHEL6.6

The Scientific Linux 6.6 release bumps OpenAFS to version 1.6.10 and it also features a new xorg-x11-server ABI due to a security error. The Scientific Linux 6.6 release is available for i386 and x86_64 architectures in a DVD ISO as well as a network boot image.

More details on Scientific Linux 6.6 via the release announcement and release notes.

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Tanglu 2 Beta "Bartholomea annulata" Is a New Linux Distro with GNOME and KDE Desktops

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Tanglu, a GNU/Linux distribution based on Debian that aims to be friendly and to cater a large user base, has been upgraded to version 2.0 Beta 2 and is now available for download and testing.

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Also: Parsix 7.0 Is an OS Based on Debian "Wheezy" and GNOME 3.12.2

Point Linux 3.0 Beta 2 Drops Compiz and Gets the Latest MATE 1.8.1 – Gallery

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Point Linux, a GNU/Linux distribution that is based on Debian GNU/Linux and uses the MATE desktop environment, has been upgraded to version 3.0 Beta 2 and is now ready for download and testing.

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Robolinux 7.7.1 Is Now Probably the Most Illegal Operating System – Gallery

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Robolinux, a fast and easy to use Linux distribution based on Debian that uses both the GNOME and Xfce desktop environments, has been updated to version 7.7.1.

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Chakra-2014.11-Euler released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Chakra team is happy to announce the second release of the Chakra Euler series, which follows the KDE Applications and Platform 4.14 releases.

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What Does Microsoft's Love Mean for Linux?

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

It’s quite obvious that it’s more about Microsoft needs Linux vs. Microsoft loves Linux. If they do love Linux, we will see them doing more ground work than just sending flowers.

Coggin says, “We are hopeful that Microsoft’s recent embrace of Linux represents more than symbolic contributions, instead representing an expanded commitment to bringing more choice to the marketplace.”

The Linux community would assume that the new lover would end all legal threats of patent infringement. We would not be seeing Brad Smith bragging about yet another patent deal with some Linux player, instead we would see him blogging about Linux Defenders.

The power of love would make Microsoft join organizations like OIN and ensure their love interest that there is nothing to fear because ‘I love you’. I wouldn’t be surprised to see them working towards dismantling the patent troll Rock Star Consortium which was created from the ashes of Nortel to mainly combat Linux and Open Source.

We would also see a ‘Microsoft in love’ joining the Linux Foundation to ‘foster’ the growth of their love object.

If we see any of this happening before we meet aliens, we will know that Microsoft does love Linux, otherwise that heart is just a sugar coating around the word ‘need’.

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Tiny MIPS COM aims Linux and Android at wearables

Filed under
Android
Linux

Ingenic’s tiny “Newton2″ wearables module is smaller and more power efficient than the original, and runs Linux or Android on a MIPS-based Ingenic M200 SoC.

The Ingenic Newton2 provides a “complete development platform for wearable and Internet of Things,” according to Imagination Technologies, which announced the product to highlight the MIPS foundation of the computer-on-module’s new Ingenic M200 processor. Compared to the original Newton announced earlier this year, however, the Newton2 is focused even more directly on wearables than larger IoT gizmos.

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More in Tux Machines

Why Everyone should know vim

Vim is an improved version of Vi, a known text editor available by default in UNIX distributions. Another alternative for modal editors is Emacs but they’re so different that I kind of feel they serve different purposes. Both are great, regardless. I don’t feel vim is necessarily a geeky kind of taste or not. Vim introduced modal editing to me and that has changed my life, really. If you have ever tried vim, you may have noticed you have to press “I” or “A” (lower case) to start writing (note: I’m aware there are more ways to start editing but the purpose is not to cover Vim’s functionalities.). The fun part starts once you realize you can associate Insert and Append commands to something. And then editing text is like thinking of what you want the computer to show on the computer instead of struggling where you at before writing. The same goes for other commands which are easily converted to mnemonics and this is what helped getting comfortable with Vim. Note that Emacs does not have this kind of keybindings but they do have a Vim-like mode - Evil (Extensive Vi Layer). More often than not, I just need to think of what I want to accomplish and type the first letters. Like Replace, Visual, Delete, and so on. It is a modal editor after all, meaning it has modes for everything. This is also what increases my productivity when writing files. I just think of my intentions and Vim does the things for me. Read more

Graphics: Intel and Mesa 18.1 RC1 Released

  • Intel 2018Q1 Graphics Stack Recipe
    Last week Intel's Open-Source Technology Center released their latest quarterly "graphics stack recipe" for the Linux desktop. The Intel Graphics Stack Recipe is the company's recommended configuration for an optimal and supported open-source graphics driver experience for their Intel HD/UHD/Iris Graphics found on Intel processors.
  • Mesa 18.1-RC1 Released With The Latest Open-Source 3D Driver Features
    Seemingly flying under our radar is that Mesa 18.1 has already been branched and the first release candidate issued. While the Mesa website hasn't yet been updated for the 18.1 details, Dylan Baker appears to be the release manager for the 18.1 series -- the second quarter of 2018 release stream.

Exploring Contributors Centrality Over Time

At the end of my previous post we concluded with yet another question. Indeed, on the 2017 KDEPIM contributor network we found out that Christian Mollekopf while being a very consistent committer didn't appear as centrality as we would expect. Yet from the topology he seemed to act as a bridge between the core contributors and contributors with a very low centrality. This time we'll try to look into this and figure out what might be going on. My first attempt at this was to try to look into the contributor network on a different time period and see how it goes. If we take two snapshots of the network for the two semesters of 2017, how would it look? Well, easy to do with my current scripts so let's see! Read more

KDE: Elisa 0.1.1, KDE Plasma 5.13 and More

  • 0.1.1 Release of Elisa
    The Elisa team is happy to announce the first bug fix release for the 0.1 version.
  • KDE Plasma 5.13 Is Making Great Improvements On Its Wayland Support
    KDE Plasma 5.13 that is due for release in June will have a great number of improvements to its Wayland support for allowing the KDE Plasma desktop to work much better on this alternative to the X.Org Server. KDE developer Roman Gilg has provided a nice summary of some of the Wayland improvements in the queue for the Plasma 5.13.0 release due out towards the middle of June.
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 15
    I’ve initiated a big project: overhauling KDE Open & Save dialogs for greater usability and productivity.
  • Latte bug fix release v0.7.5
    Latte Dock v0.7.5   has been released containing important fixes and improvements! Hopefullly this is going to be the last stable version for v0.7.x family. During the next months the next stable branch (v0.8.x) is going to appear.