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The Linux Foundation’s Core Infrastructure Initiative Announces New Backers, First Projects to Receive Support and Advisory Board Members

Filed under
Linux
Security

The Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII), a project hosted by The Linux Foundation that enables technology companies, industry stakeholders and esteemed developers to collaboratively identify and fund open source projects that are in need of assistance, today announced five new backers, the first projects to receive funding from the Initiative and the Advisory Board members who will help identify critical infrastructure projects most in need of support.

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System76 Galago UltraPro: Powerful Linux laptop but not quite an ultrabook

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
Reviews

When I set out to find a new laptop, I was looking for an ultrabook --a 13-inch powerhouse with plenty of battery life and a gorgeous screen. On top of everything, it had to run Linux.

That search led me to the System76 Galago UltraPro. Although not technically an ultrabook (it's too big, doesn't have ultrabook-level battery life, and doesn't contain a solid state drive). What it does have is elegance and power to spare...to the tune of besting most currently available ultrabooks. And, like all System76 devices, it runs Ubuntu Linux.

Let's take a look at what's good and bad with the Galago UltraPro.

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Why No Flash Support for Linux Is Good for Open Source

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS

Flash, the ubiquitous media framework for the Web, soon will no longer work for Linux users of the Chromium browser, the open source version of Google Chrome. Is it time for the Linux world to panic? Not at all.

Here's what's happening: Soon, the means by which Flash support was traditionally implemented in Chromium, via a plugin originally designed for Netscape, will no longer work. Instead, Flash support will come in the form of a new API called Pepper, which Google has created for Chrome.

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Jaguar Land Rover are recruiting Tizen Developer Jobs, in Portland, Oregon

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Linux

Jaguar Land Rover R&D are to opening a state of the art new ‘Open Software Technology Centre’ in Portland Oregon, with an expected 2014 launch date. They are now looking for experienced software engineers to help in its research and product development efforts, on future vehicle infotainment technologies.

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systemd 213 Arrives with Daemon to Sync System Clock Across Network

Filed under
Development
Linux
Red Hat

systemd, a service manager for Linux compatible with SysV and LSB init scripts, which provides aggressive parallelization capabilities and uses socket and D-Bus activation for starting services, has just reached version 213 and comes with a lot of changes and improvements.

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Linux 3.15 Kernel I/O Scheduler Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

After writing yesterday about the BFQ I/O scheduler update with its hopeful intentions of landing within the mainline Linux kernel, some readers wrote in about updated I/O scheduler results... Here they are.

I had some time yesterday on an idle Intel ultrabook system to run some Linux I/O scheduler benchmarks using the latest daily version of the Linux 3.15 kernel in its latest development stage that will be finalized in the weeks ahead. The I/O scheduler tests with a variety of open-source disk benchmarks were done using the default I/O scheduler options of Noop, Deadline, and CFQ.

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Hands-on with Kali Linux 1.0.7

Filed under
Linux
Security

One last thing about booting Kali Linux. The details of this are beyond the scope of this kind of general Linux blog, but one of the major advances in this release is support for Encrypted USB Persistence. This is specifically for people who will be booting Kali from a USB stick, it gives them the possibility to securely save changes to an encrypted partition on the USB drive. I haven't had time to look at this in detail yet, much less actually try it out, but at first glance I think it probably removes one of the major reasons for carrying a dedicated laptop around for security analysis, rather than just a Live USB stick.

So there you have it, short and very sweet. If you are interested in network security, forensic analysis or penetration testing, this is a Linux distribution you need to know about. If you're already using it, just make sure that you pick up the latest updates so that you get the new kernel and tools.

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Java Doesn't Work on Linux Google Chrome 35, Downgrade Required

Filed under
Linux
Google

Google considers that GTK+ is no longer meeting its requirements and decided to push its own solution for Google Chrome, in the form of Aura. The heralded GTK+x replacement for the Chrome browser has a downside for the Linux users, which are now forced to downgrade to an older version.

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Tales of Distros Tried and True

Filed under
GNU
Linux

"We all have our favorite distro(s), so here's an opportunity to tell the world about your pick of the bunch," the Linux Voice article begins.

"What made you choose it? Did you come across it by accident, or was it recommended to you?" the introduction reads. "Have you been running it since your first forays into the world of Linux, or is it a more recent discovery? And do you plan to stick with it for a while?"

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Intel: BYOD enterprise Android is OK

Filed under
Android
Linux

Is Intel doing more than many of the other major vendors when it comes to facilitating Android implementation?

The answer, quite possibly, is yes.

Anyone signed up for the Intel developer newsletters will receive a string of alerts from the company we used to know as the "chip giant" -- is it now becoming the "software giant"?

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LWN (Now Open Access): Kernel Configuration, Linux 4.14 Merge Window, Running Android on a Mainline Graphics Stack

  • A different approach to kernel configuration
    The kernel's configuration system can be challenging to deal with; Linus Torvalds recently called it "one of the worst parts of the whole project". Thus, anything that might help users with the process of configuring a kernel build would be welcome. A talk by Junghwan Kang at the 2017 Open-Source Summit demonstrated an interesting approach, even if it's not quite ready for prime time yet. Kang is working on a Debian-based, cloud-oriented distribution; he wanted to tweak the kernel configuration to minimize the size of the kernel and, especially, to reduce its attack surface by removing features that were not needed. The problem is that the kernel is huge, and there are a lot of features that are controlled by configuration options. There are over 300 feature groups and over 20,000 configuration options in current kernels. Many of these options have complicated dependencies between them, adding to the challenge of configuring them properly.
  • The first half of the 4.14 merge window
    September 8, 2017 As of this writing, just over 8,000 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline kernel repository for the 4.14 development cycle. In other words, it looks like the pace is not slowing down for this cycle either. The merge window is not yet done, but quite a few significant changes have been merged so far. Read on for a summary of the most interesting changes entering the mainline in the first half of this merge window.
  • Running Android on a mainline graphics stack
    The Android system may be based on the Linux kernel, but its developers have famously gone their own way for many other parts of the system. That includes the graphics subsystem, which avoids user-space components like X or Wayland and has special (often binary-only) kernel drivers as well. But that picture may be about to change. As Robert Foss described in his Open Source Summit North America presentation, running Android on the mainline graphics subsystem is becoming possible and brings a number of potential benefits. He started the talk by addressing the question of why one might want to use mainline graphics with Android. The core of the answer was simple enough: we use open-source software because it's better, and running mainline graphics takes us toward a fully open system. With mainline graphics, there are no proprietary blobs to deal with. That, in turn, makes it easy to run current versions of the kernel and higher-level graphics software like Mesa.

Beautify Your KDE Plasma 5 Desktop Environment with Freshly Ported Adapta Theme

Good morning! It's time to beautify your KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment, and we have just the perfect theme for that as it looks like the popular Adapta GTK theme was recently ported to Plasma 5. Read more

Roughing it, with Linux

I have been traveling for about two weeks now, spending 10 days camping in Iceland and now a few days on the ferry to get back. For this trip I brought along my Samsung N150 Plus (a very old netbook), loaded with openSUSE Linux 42.3. Read more

Red Hat: Ansible Tower, Patent Promise, and Shares Declining

  • Red Hat’s automation solution spreading among APAC enterprises
    Red Hat recently shared revealed its agentless automation platform is spreading among enterprises in APAC countries like Australia, China, India and Singapore. The company asserts its Ansible Tower helps enterprises cut through the complexities of modern IT environments with powerful automation capabilities that improve productivity and reduce downtime. “Today’s business demands can mean even greater complexity for many organisations. Such dynamic environments can necessitate a new approach to automation that can improve speed, scale and stability across IT environments,” says head of APAC office of technology at Red Hat, Frank Feldmann.
  • Red Hat broadens patent pledge to most open-source software
    Red Hat, the world's biggest open source company, has expanded its commitment on patents, which had originally been not to enforce its patents against free and open source software.
  • Red Hat expands Patent Promise
    Open-source software provider Red Hat has revised its Patent Promise, which was initially intended to discourage patent aggression against free and open-source software. The expanded version of the defensive patent aggregation scheme extends the zone of non-enforcement to all of Red Hat’s patents and all software under “well-recognised” open-source licenses. In its original Patent Promise in 2002, Red Hat said software patents are “inconsistent with open-source and free software”.
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) AO Seeing a Consistent Downtrend
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) noted a price change of -0.14% and RingCentral, Inc. (RNG) closes with a move of -2.09%