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2038 Kernel Summit Discussion Fodder

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Linux

So 2038 brings the end of time for 32bit architectures. It being some
twenty four years ahead, it may seem like there is plenty of time for folks
to migrate to 64bit architectures that are (mostly) unaffected by this
issue. However, 32bit processors are still being produced today in
extremely high volumes, and many of those systems are being used in
commercial, industrial and medical environments, where these systems may be
quite literally embedded into the walls and machinery and are expected to
run for 25 years or more. As these small systems become more and more
pervasive, the risks of major trouble in 2038 grow. And thatâs to say
nothing of the impact on future classic-car resale prices for fancy cars
like the Tesla when the high end in-dash display wonât work (gasp!).

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Sandwich-style ARM9 SBC ships with Linux

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Linux

MYIR announced a sandwich-style single board computer that runs Linux on a Freescale i.MX28x SoC and features -40 to 85°C operation and a CAN bus interface.

MYIR specializes in low-power ARM single board computers (SBCs) and computer-on-modules (COMs), with the latter including the MYC-SAM9X5-V2 (using Atmel’s ARM9-based AT91SAM9X5) and MYC-AM335X (using TI’s Cortex-A8 based Sitara AM335x). With the new MYC-IMX28X COM and associated MYD-IMX28X development board, the company is mining the Freescale i.MX28x, a 454MHz, ARM9 system-on-chip that has been used in many embedded Linux boards, most recently including Technologic’s TS-7400-V2.

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Linux vs. Windows Internet Battle No Longer Exists Because Linux Is Winning

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Windows and Linux communities used to virtually battle each other regarding the superiority of one platform or the other, but that is no longer happening, at least not at the same scale. One of the reasons for that might be that Linux is actually gaining ground.

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More: Are the Linux versus Windows flame wars finally coming to an end?

64-bit mobile processors for Android L is coming

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Android
Linux

Back in 2011, Nvidia announced to the world that they had acquired a license for the latest ARM instruction set, the ARM v8. But the most exciting part of the deal was that the new ARM instruction set is 64-bit. After making 32-bit mobile CPUs, Nvidia was set to take their Tegra K1 platform to the next level with a 64-bit mobile CPU. At the Hot Chips conference this year, Nvidia revealed their little project that they have been quietly working in for all these year. The Tegra K1 ARM v8 64-bit chip from Nvidia is ready for a release later next year. The new chip is codenamed Project Denver.

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Linux-based controller mixes Atom SoC with Kintex-7 FPGA

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Linux
Hardware

NI’s new 4-slot CompactRIO control system combines a dual-core Atom E3825 with a Kintex-7 FPGA, and features industrial temperatures and NI Real-Time Linux.

The National Instruments (NI) “CompactRIO 4-slot Performance Controller” is the high end “performance” big brother to NI’s “value” CompactRIO cRIO-9068 model, introduced a year ago. Whereas the cRIO-9068 runs NI Linux Real-Time OS on a Xilinx ARM+FPGA hybrid Zynq-7020 system-on-chip, the new CompactRIO splits processing duty between an Intel Atom processor and a higher-end Xilinx Kintex-7 325T FPGA. The CompactRIO uses a dual-core, 1.33GHz Atom E3825 SoC from the latest, 22nm Bay-Trail-I generation, featuring a relatively low, 6 Watt TDP.

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Linux APIC Code Prepares For A Major Overhaul

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Linux

The x86 APIC subsystem within the Linux kernel is beginning the process of a major overhaul with the Linux 3.17 kernel.

The Advanced Programmable Interrupt Controller (APIC) support is being overhauled to support physical IOAPIC hot-plugging. Within the Linux 3.17 kernel this feature isn't present but the prepatory work is moving forward after a first attempt at the hot-plug support was rejected on technical grounds. In prepping for the APIC hot-plug support, obsolete driver abstractions were removed and other changes made for this merge window.

Those concerned about the Linux APIC code can find out more about the forthcoming changes via this lengthy mailing list message.

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9 Signs You Should Use Linux on Your Computer

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GNU
Linux

you may know Linux operating systems are in the vast majority of cases completely free, and not just free in the sense that you don't have to pay anything, but also in the sense that you're free to legally copy it as many times as you want and share with anyone. What's called illegal piracy in the Windows world pretty much doesn't exist in the Linux world. That's the nature of open source software licensing.

This can lead to money savings because you don't have to buy Windows upgrades to run it legally, and if you're upgrading multiple systems (family, business, etc.) this can add up.

Yet despite being free the quality is surprisingly good. Big companies like Canonical, RedHat, Novell, Google and so on are funding its development and making money on related support services they offer their business users. The model is shown to work. You may not be foreign to open source software if you've used popular programs like Chrome, Firefox, VLC, and many others, all of which are open source, like Linux.

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Black Lab Linux 6.0 Preview 2 Is Now Based on Xfce and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS – Gallery

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Linux
Ubuntu

Black Lab Linux 6.0 Preview 2, a distribution based on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, has been released and is now ready for testing.

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Zorin OS 9 Business Is a Good Replacement for Companies That Don't Want to Pay for Windows

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OS
GNU
Linux

The final version of Zorin OS 9 Business, an Ubuntu-based operating system aimed at Windows users who are switching over to Linux, has been released and is available for purchase.

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The Connected Car, Part 2: Wired For Wireless - It's All Business

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Linux

The connected car is a battlefield among technology purveyors fighting to get their hardware plugged into the vehicle's network bus. Open source technology is becoming a key contender. OEMs are sorting through a garage full of options from versions of embedded Linux to the Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) distro and the Android car platform.

The connected car concept is picking up speed as a vehicle intelligence system in its own right. It is turning the common car into a fully functional communications center on wheels. Its abilities reach far beyond mere infotainment.

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today's howtos

Graphics: Texture Compression, Enlightenment Foundation Libraries (EFL), and AMD FreeSync

  • Unity Continues Crunching More Out Of Crunch Texture Compression
    Unity is one of the big public users of the open-source Crunch DXT texture compression library. While it's no longer maintained by Rich Geldreich / Binomial, Unity has continued advancing this open-source code to further improve the compression ratio and speed. For months Unity has been talking about their promising findings with Crunch. But this is the project that Rich Geldreich, the former Valve developer, previously expressed regret having open-sourced all of it. While he is on to working on better and more advanced technologies at his Binomial startup, Unity is working to squeeze more out of this open-source library.
  • Improving EFL Graphics With Wayland Application Redraws
    Under X, application redraws are tricky to do without tearing because content can be updated at any chosen time with no clear feedback as to when the compositor will read it. EFL uses some clever tricks to this end (check out the state of the art X redraw timing for yourself), but it’s difficult to get right in all cases. For a lot of people this just works, or they’re not sensitive to the issue when it doesn’t.
  • Improved Wayland Application Redraws Coming To Enlightenment's EFL
    Samsung's Open-Source Group has been working on making their Wayland support in the Enlightenment Foundation Libraries (EFL) even better. The latest Wayland work on the Enlightenment/EFL front has been improving the application redraw process. The EFL toolkit with the upcoming v1.21 release will now be hooking into Wayland's frame callbacks to better dealing with drawing, only drawing when necessary, and doing so without the possibility of tearing.
  • AMD FreeSync For Tear-Free Linux Gaming - Current State In 2017
    If you are thinking of gifting yourself (or someone else) a FreeSync-compatible monitor this holiday season, here's a look at how the AMD FreeSync support is working right now, the driver bits you need to be aware of, and how it's all playing out for those wanting to use this tear-free capability for Linux gaming.

KStars 2.8.9 is released!

Here comes the last KStars release for 2017! KStars v2.8.9 is available now for Windows, MacOS, and Linux. Robert Lancaster worked on improving PHD2 support with Ekos. This includes retrieving the guide star image, drift errors and RMS values, among other minor improvements and refactoring of the Ekos PHD2 codebase to support future extensions. Read more

Security: Mirai, Vista 10, Starbucks, and Hacking Team Investigation

  • Mirai IoT Botnet Co-Authors Plead Guilty

    The U.S. Justice Department on Tuesday unsealed the guilty pleas of two men first identified in January 2017 by KrebsOnSecurity as the likely co-authors of Mirai, a malware strain that remotely enslaves so-called “Internet of Things” devices such as security cameras, routers, and digital video recorders for use in large scale attacks designed to knock Web sites and entire networks offline (including multiple major attacks against this site).

  • Google Researcher Finds Flaw in Pre-Installed Windows 10 Password Manager
    Google security researcher Tavis Ormandy, who has previously discovered, reported, and disclosed several major bugs in Windows and its features, came across a new security vulnerability affecting Microsoft users. This time, the flaw exists in the Keeper password manager that comes pre-installed in some Windows 10 versions, with Ormandy explaining that it’s similar to a vulnerability that he discovered in August 2016. “I remember filing a bug a while ago about how they were injecting privileged UI into pages,” Ormandy explained on December 14. “I checked and, they're doing the same thing again with this version,” he continues.
  • Starbucks Wi-Fi Turned People’s Laptops into Cryptocurrency Miners
    The free Wi-Fi that the Buenos Aires Starbucks offers to its customers was being used to mine for cryptocurrency, and what’s worse, it used people’s laptops to do it. The whole thing was discovered by Stensul CEO Noah Dinkin who actually paid a visit to the store and wanted to browse the web using the free Wi-Fi, only to discover that his laptop was unknowingly converted into a cryptocurrency miner. He then turned to Twitter to ask Starbucks if they know about the what he described as bitcoin mining taking place without customers knowing about it. “Hi Starbucks, did you know that your in-store wifi provider in Buenos Aires forces a 10 second delay when you first connect to the wifi so it can mine bitcoin using a customer's laptop? Feels a little off-brand,” he said in his tweet.
  • Italian Prosecutor Makes Request to Close Hacking Team Investigation
    The damaging data breach that exposed the secrets of an infamous surveillance tech company might go unsolved forever. After more than two years, the Italian prosecutor who was investigating the attack on the Milan-based Hacking Team has asked the case to be dismissed, according to multiple sources. On Monday, the Milan prosecutor Alessandro Gobbis sent a notice to the people under investigation informing them that he had sent the judge a request to shut down the investigation, according to a copy of the document obtained by Motherboard.