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64-bit ARM Kernel Gets Closer To Building Under LLVM With Linux 3.18

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Linux

The ARM64 changes for the Linux 3.18 merge window were sent in and include an eBPF JIT compiler for ARM64, a CPU suspend back-end for the PSCI firmware interface, EFI stub improvements, and a code clean-up to allow partially building the kernel with LLVM.

Via the LLVMLinux initiative has been work to build the Linux kernel with Clang for its faster build times, lower memory usage, static analysis capabilities, and for making the kernel's code more portable across compilers. The Clang compiler for x86 and ARM is generally in good shape for being able to build the Linux kernel but there's still patches that haven't yet been mainlined for the kernel side. For more information you can read Building The Linux Kernel With LLVM's Clang Yields Comparable Performance. The good news is that for Linux 3.18 the 64-bit ARM code is closer to being Clang-compatible from mainline.

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COM runs Linux on quad-core Marvell Armada XP SoC

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Linux

Pactron announced a Linux-based “Sherwood” COM Express Module and hardware development kit built around Marvell’s Armada XP SoC featuring four ARMv7 cores.

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The future of Linux looks very, very thin

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Linux

A host of technologies -- most prominently CoreOS -- are challenging the foundation of what Linux means and how it's sold.

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Linux Foundation certifications are taking off

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GNU
Linux

According to a study conducted earlier this year by Dice, the tech career site, 93 percent of hiring managers are looking to employ Linux professionals. If you want one of those jobs, a great way to increase your chances is to go to human resources with one of the Linux Foundation's new certifications as a Certified SysAdmin (LFCS) or Certified Engineer (LFCE).

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Gaming On Linux Loses Editor, Plagiarist to Blame.

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Linux
Gaming

Gaming On Linux, a popular online portal for Linux gamers, shut down today. And it’s a shame. For all intents and purposes, The Powerbase is shut down as well — but not for today. Gaming on Linux has shut down because of the incessant troll behavior of the Gaming on Linux Podcast. It upsets me that the Editor of Gaming on Linux can’t just ignore it — but that’s beyond the scope of this rant. I am not so much reporting the news today as I am speaking out against the rampant, virus-like stupidity that is the Linux Game Cast. The crew at Linux Game Cast are some of the most unhappy, loneliest, skill-less vagina repellants I’ve ever encountered on the Internet. And I’m mostly just talking about Pedro…

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Many ACPI & Power Management Changes For Linux 3.18 Kernel

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Linux

Rafael Wysocki sent out his first aligned set of changes of ACPI core and power management changes he's planning on volleying over to Linus Torvalds for the Linux 3.18 kernel merge window.

There's many ACPI/PM changes as usual per kernel cycle and they affect a few thousand lines of code (anticipated 3.18 merge window ACPI/PM pull: 130 files changed, 3968 insertions, 1528 deletions). Those curious about all of the ACPI/PM changes or if they have one of their issues fixed, you can see Rafael's mailing list post that is basically a pre-pull message to ensure all patches have been queued up.

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Spotify is Powered by Linux and Open Source

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GNU
Linux
Server

Spotify can aptly be called the "Netflix for music." The company started off in 2008 and by 2014 it boasts more than 40 million users with 10 million paid subscribers. The Swedish company is yet another example of how Linux and open source enable businesses to serve millions of customers using state-of-the-art, shared technologies.

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Kano's DIY computer teaches kids to code, and now it's available to everyone

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Linux

Kano, the runaway Kickstarter success that raised $1.52 million on a promise to teach kids how to code and assemble a Raspberry Pi-based computer, is now widely available to the public. Priced at $149.99, the kit includes everything you need to get started — other than a display, which you'll need to provide yourself. (An HDMI cord comes in the box.) But beyond that, it's all there: the Raspberry Pi, a custom-made Bluetooth keyboard with built-in trackpad, the plastic case that holds this mini-computer together, and plenty of stickers and colorful options for customizing your Kano. The first of two illustrated guides walks younger users through piecing Kano together, and most everything in the kit is color coded to make setup a breeze for all ages. The second book will teach you how to start using the Kano OS software, which comes preloaded on an SD card that plugs into the Raspberry Pi.

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Many ACPI & Power Management Changes For Linux 3.18 Kernel

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Linux

Rafael Wysocki sent out his first aligned set of changes of ACPI core and power management changes he's planning on volleying over to Linus Torvalds for the Linux 3.18 kernel merge window.

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Also: Linux 3.18 Gets Better Wacom Tablet & Sony Controller Support

Sleek Mini-ITX industrial PCs come in four Intel flavors

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Linux
Ubuntu

Logic Supply unveiled four Ubuntu-ready, Mini-ITX industrial PCs based on Intel Celeron (Bay Trail and Ivy Bridge) and Core (Haswell-ULT and Haswell) CPUs.

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Canonical Ubuntu 2017 milestones, a year in the rulebook

So has Canonical been breaking rules with Ubuntu is 2017, or has it in been writing its own rulebook? Back in April we saw an AWS-tuned kernel of Ubuntu launched, the move to cloud is unstoppable, clearly. We also saw Ubuntu version 17.04 released, with Unity 7 as the default desktop environment. This release included optimisations for environments with low powered graphics hardware. Read more Also: Ubuntu will let upgraders ‘opt-in’ to data collection in 18.04

The npm Bug

  • ​Show-stopping bug appears in npm Node.js package manager
    Are you a developer who uses npm as the package manager for your JavaScript or Node.js code? If so, do not -- I repeat do not -- upgrade to npm 5.7.0. Nothing good can come of it. As one user reported, "This destroyed 3 production servers after a single deploy!" So, what happened here? According to the npm GitHub bug report, "By running sudo npm under a non-root user (root users do not have the same effect), filesystem permissions are being heavily modified. For example, if I run sudo npm --help or sudo npm update -g, both commands cause my filesystem to change ownership of directories such as /etc, /usr, /boot, and other directories needed for running the system. It appears that the ownership is recursively changed to the user currently running npm."
  • Botched npm Update Crashes Linux Systems, Forces Users to Reinstall
    A bug in npm (Node Package Manager), the most widely used JavaScript package manager, will change ownership of crucial Linux system folders, such as /etc, /usr, /boot. Changing ownership of these files either crashes the system, various local apps, or prevents the system from booting, according to reports from users who installed npm v5.7.0. —the buggy npm update.

Windows 10 WSL vs. Linux Performance For Early 2018

Back in December was our most recent round of Windows Subsystem for Linux benchmarking with Windows 10 while since then both Linux and Windows have received new stable updates, most notably for mitigating the Spectre and Meltdown CPU vulnerabilities. For your viewing pleasure today are some fresh benchmarks looking at the Windows 10 WSL performance against Linux using the latest updates as of this week while also running some comparison tests too against Docker on Windows and Oracle VM VirtualBox. Read more