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Linux

LinuxCon announces speakers

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Linux

desktoplinux.com: Linux Foundation's inaugural LinuxCon event is scheduled for Sept. 21-23, 2009, in Portland, Oregon. LinuxCon intends to draw a mix of end-users, administrators, and top Linux developers, with speakers including Linus Torvalds, Mark Shuttleworth, and Greg Kroah-Hartman.

Shuttleworth: On cadence and collaboration

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Linux
Ubuntu

lwn.net: Mark Shuttleworth has joined into the discussion on Debian release cycles; it's a rather lengthy attempt to make peace.

Linux GFX and state of drivers

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Linux

techenclave.com: Well this thread maybe useful for people who are planning to purchase a system for linux use only and which GFX card to choose mainly ATI, NVIDIA or Intel.

Linux Mint 7 review

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Linux

gnulinuxuser.wordpress: Time for another Linux distro review! It should come as no surprise that this review is on Linux Mint 7, codenamed Gloria, at least not to anyone who knows me. I have been quite a fan of Linux Mint, with its ease of use and reputation for being “Ubuntu done right.”

A Look at Linux Educacional 3.0

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Linux

igneousquill.net: A week or so ago I stumbled across an article, in Portuguese, from March of this year that talks about a program the Brazilian government's ministry of education is expanding. It's pretty exciting, especially for those interested in Linux.

Review: SimplyMepis 8.0

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Linux

raiden.net: SimplyMepis, or Mepis for short, is a distribution targeted towards new users that has the intended goal of providing a good distribution that is easy to use. Version 7.0, which was my first experience with Mepis was pretty good. But past success means little if the newer version doesn't deliver. So let's see how SimplyMepis 8 does.

10 Essential UNIX/Linux Command Cheat Sheets

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Linux

junauza.com: The commands and shell scripts have remained powerful for advanced users to utilize to help them do complicated tasks quickly and efficiently. To spare you from the hassles of searching, I have here a collection of 10 essential UNIX/Linux cheat sheets that can greatly help you on your quest for mastery:

Distro Hoppin`: Linux Mint 7 KDE Edition

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Linux

itlure.com: Ah... Linux Mint! The Ubuntu-made-even-better operating system that everybody loves to praise. And for good reason, in my humble opinion.

Linux Needs to be "House" Trained. Not.

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OS
Linux

daniweb.com/blogs: It's hard to convince Joe and Mary User to convert to Linux when the first things you hear from them are: "Where's my <insert stupid application here>?" "Why can't I just have <insert ridiculous thing here>?" or the ever-popular "This doesn't work like <insert overpriced application here>?"

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