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Linux

Why Did Docker Catch on Quickly and Why is it so Interesting?

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Linux

One reason Docker is interesting is that all four answers are each individually useful, but can be used in combination. This causes cross-pollination of ideas and patterns. For example, someone might start using Docker because they like the speed and portability, but find that they end up adopting the configuration and Docker hub patterns as well.

The Docker technology is still fairly new; work is underway to add missing features, and a large ecosystem of related projects and companies is forming around it. There’s a lot of interest in the technology from the VC community, as we try to figure out whom to fund to do what, and how the story will play out in the longer term.

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Linus Torvalds Says Linux Binary Packages Are Terrible, Valve Might Save the Desktop

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Linux

One of the main problems with Linux platform fragmentation is that there are a number of concurrent binaries available for various platforms and they are not compatible with each other. Linus Torvalds explains why he thinks that the binary concept on Linux is broken and why he doesn't use them for his projects..

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It's time to split Linux distros in two

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Linux

You can take a Linux installation of nearly any distribution and turn it into a server, then back into a workstation by installing and uninstalling various packages. The OS core remains the same, and the stability and performance will be roughly the same, assuming you tune they system along the way. Those two workloads are very different, however, and as computing power continues to increase, the workloads are diverging even more.

Maybe it's time Linux is split in two. I suggested this possibility last week when discussing systemd (or that FreeBSD could see higher server adoption), but it's more than systemd coming into play here. It's from the bootloader all the way up. The more we see Linux distributions trying to offer chimera-like operating systems that can be a server or a desktop at a whim, the more we tend to see the dilution of both. You can run stock Debian Jessie on your laptop or on a 64-way server. Does it not make sense to concentrate all efforts on one or the other?

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Raspberry Pi-powered in-car computer project shifts up a gear

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Development
Linux
Interviews

After watching classic TV shows such as Knight Rider and Street Hawk in his youth, IT professional and Raspberry Pi enthusiast Derek Knaggs was inspired to create a low-cost in-car computer using a Raspberry Pi.
The Pi sits in the centre console of his Ford Focus, wired to the display of an Xtrons DVD player (optional) as well as two TFT screens in the rear headrests. Control is via a Xenta wireless keyboard with mouse touchpad, while a smartphone can be used as a wireless hotspot to give the Pi an internet connection on the move.
Having recently added a reverse camera to his already top-notch project, we caught up with Derek to learn more about it…

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GNOME 3.14 Still Depends On ConsoleKit, More Systemd Still Planned

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Linux
GNOME

Some plans for the GNOME 3.14 cycle didn't materialize but they're still being developed for future GNOME updates.

For the GNOME 3.14 development cycle was a plan to make most GNOME modules depend on a systemd logind-like API that would only implement the API bits actually used by the respective pieces of GNOME software. The goal was to make this minimal API a shim between the GNOME code and logind for allowing other non-Linux platforms to write an alternative implementation against the API. The purpose of this would be for the BSDs also using GNOME to only have to write a portable implementation of the logind-derived API calls actually being used by GNOME rather than a full, drop-in replacement.

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Also: OpenBSD Made Progress On Their Systemd-Compatible Replacement

Linus 3.17-rc4

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Linux

For a short while there, this week was really nice and calm, but that
was mostly because the "linux-foundation.org" entry fell off the DNS
universe, and my mailbox got very quiet for a few hours. The rest of
the week looked pretty normal.

"Pretty normal" isn't bad, though, and I'm not complaining. There is
nothing particularly big or scary going on - we had a quick scare
about a stupid compat layer bug, but it seems to have been just a
false positive and resulted in some added commentary rather than any
real code changes.

The diffstat is pretty reasonable, and it's fairly spread out. We have
the usual arch and driver updates, but there's actually more changes
under fs/ than under either of those. That's largely due to just a
late f2fs update, which I decided I couldn't be bothered to get too
upset about, most of it being pretty clear-cut fixes, with just a few
cleanups mixed in.

And really, if the f2fs changes look biggish, it's mostly because the
rest is pretty small.

Let's hope it all stays calm. I do note that neither Greg nor Davem
ended up sending me anything for rc4, which is probably the _real_
reason why it's pretty calm and small.

Linus

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CBI demands high-end gadgets

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Linux

Use of LINUX technology at its forensic lab is also the top priority of the agency.

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Yet Another Linux Distro Trying To Cater Towards Gamers

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Linux
Gaming

While there's already a handful of Linux distributions trying to cater towards the increasing number of gamers with no real competitive edge over any of the other long-standing, general-purpose Linux distributions (sans SteamOS), there's yet another new one to report on this weekend.

The latest Linux distribution to come about that's aspiring for adoption by Linux gamers is "Play Linux", a distribution based on Ubuntu LTS that's "specially designed for gamers" and more. Gil Nóbrega, the project's co-founder and main builder, wrote into Phoronix saying, "It is not only a gaming distro but it is an All-In-One distro for Gamers, because gamers are not only gamers, right? They have to work or study too."

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Linux workshop in Udupi

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GNU
Linux

The student chapter of Indian Society for Technical Education (ISTE) of SMV Institute of Technology and Management conducted a two-day workshop on Linux operating system for final year Electronics and Communications students at Bantakal in Udupi district on August 22 and 23.

Edwin, a former professor of Electronics Engineering at Spring Garden College, Philadelphia, U.S., was the resource person.

Prof. Edwin said that Linux, which was a free operating system and free from viruses, had been adapted by more computer hardware platforms than any other operating system.

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4MLinux 10.0 Rescue Edition BETA released.

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GNU
Linux

The main features in this release are antivirus protection (Clam AntiVirus 0.98.4 with ClamWin), system backup (4MLinux Backup Scripts 10.0), data recovery (GNU ddrescue 1.18.1, TestDisk 6.14 with QPhotoRec), data wiping (shred 8.2.3, nwipe 0.16), disk partitioning (cfdisk 2.25, cgdisk 0.8.10, GNU Parted 3.2), and partition imaging (Partimage 0.6.9, Partclone 0.2.69). Many archive formats can be managed via 7-Zip 9.22, FreeArc 0.67, and PeaZip 5.4.1. File managers (Midnight Commander 4.8.12, X File Explorer 1.37, muCommander 0.9.0), CD/DVD burners (cdw 0.7.1, InfraRecorder 0.53), and UNetbootin 608 are also included.

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Linux Foundation: Juniper/OpenContrail and Bell Canada at Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP)

  • Juniper Expands Contrail, Moves Open-Source Project to the Linux Foundation
    "Fortunately at Juniper we have a secrect weapon and one that i'm so very proud of and that's Contrail," Rami Rahim, Juniper Networks CEO said during his keynote. "The way we have been investing and innovating in Contrail over the last few years is sort of similar to how a car company would invest in a Formula 1 car, it's essentially a proving ground for the world's best technology." Rahim commented that the use-cases for Contrail so far have been somewhat limited, but that's about to change. "The future of Contrail is as a platform, a single controller that can solve a variety of really compelling use-cases with ease and simplicity," Rahim said. "Whether it's management of overlay and underlay, or SD-WAN connectivity, or multi-cloud fabric management." Juniper originally acquired Contrail in December 2012 in a deal valued at $176 million. In September 2013, Juniper open-sourcedthe Contrail technology, creating the OpenContrail project.
  • Juniper Networks' OpenContrail software defined network joins The Linux Foundation
    The Linux Foundation is far more than just Linux. It's also the home of many open-source networking projects such as the software-defined network (SDN) OpenDaylight, Open Platform for Network Function Virtualization (OPNFV), and Open Network Automation Program (ONAP). Now, networking power Juniper Networks has announced that OpenContrail, its open-source network virtualization cloud platform, will join the others as part of The Linux Foundation.
  • Juniper Moves OpenContrail to the Linux Foundation
    Juniper first released its Contrail products as open source in 2013 and built a community around the project. However, many stakeholders complained that Juniper didn’t work very hard to build the community, and some called it “faux-pen source.”
  • Juniper Moves SDN-Based OpenContrail Project to The Linux Foundation
    Juniper Networks today announced the codebase for OpenContrail, its open source network virtualization platform for the cloud, is moving to The Linux Foundation.
  • Bell Canada says open source ONAP adds modularity, flexibility to its network
    Bell Canada has become one of the first service providers to deploy Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP), focusing its initial attention on automating its data center tenant network provisioning process. By making this transition in its network, the service provider said it will provide its operations teams with a new tool to improve efficiency and time to market. This is the first step in using ONAP as a common platform across Bell’s networks on its journey towards a multipartner DevOps model.
  • Bell Canada First to Deploy Open Source ONAP in Production
    Canadian communications provider Bell is the first organization to deploy an open source version of the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) in a production environment. The milestone was noted in a blog post by Arpit Joshipura, general manager of networking and orchestration with the Linux Foundation.

Software: Everdo, GIMP, Notepadqq

  • Everdo – A Todo List and Getting Things Done App for Linux
    Everdo is a modern and beautifully-designed Electron-based task management application with which you can keep track of your work using tags, project folders, smart filters, and schedules. It doesn’t need a cloud account to work so your data will remain save on your PC. Everdo features a modern and minimalist User Interface with an extremely clean, clutter-less, and uniform design in order to enhance speedy and distraction-free productivity.
  • GIMP 2.9.8 Released with On-Canvas Gradient Editing, Better PSD Support
    GIMP 2.9.8 has been released with on-canvas gradient editing, better handling of Adobe Photoshop PSD files, and support for those using GIMP on Wayland.
  • GIMP 2.9.8 Released With On-Canvas Gradient Editing, Wayland Support
    GIMP 2.9.8 has been released as the newest development version of this widely-used, open-source Photoshop-like program in its road to GIMP 2.10. Earlier this week I happened to highlight many of the changes building up for GIMP 2.9.8 as featured in A Lot Of Improvements Are Building Up For GIMP 2.9.8, Including Better Wayland Support.
  • Getting started with the Notepadqq Linux text editor
    I don't do Windows. The operating system, I mean. At least, not on my own computers and not with any of my own work. When I was a consultant, I often had to work out of my clients' offices, which meant using their hardware, which also meant using Windows at many of those offices. Even when using Windows, I tried to install as much open source software as I could. Why? Because it works as well as (if not better than) its proprietary equivalents. One of the applications I always installed was Notepad++, which Opensource.com community moderator Ruth Holloway looked at in 2016.

Getting started with the Notepadqq Linux text editor

I don't do Windows. The operating system, I mean. At least, not on my own computers and not with any of my own work. When I was a consultant, I often had to work out of my clients' offices, which meant using their hardware, which also meant using Windows at many of those offices. Even when using Windows, I tried to install as much open source software as I could. Why? Because it works as well as (if not better than) its proprietary equivalents. One of the applications I always installed was Notepad++, which Opensource.com community moderator Ruth Holloway looked at in 2016. Read more