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Linux

ARM is not about the status quo : Open source breeds new architectures

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Linux
Hardware

“The rise of open source has opened doors for new architectures; the ARM partnership entering the market has already changed people’s perception of what’s possible; you’ll see that it’s going to drive a faster pace of innovation. Think of what happened in the phone ecosystem. It changed so much over the last five years in terms of what’s possible, and that’s been largely because there’s been a huge number of choices and innovation in terms of supply chain, in terms of new IP that’s being integrated. I expect to see the same thing happen in the data center space because now you have all these choices and people are innovating at different paces but it’s still overall accelerating the pace of innovation in the market,” said Mandyam.

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CompuLab Utilite: A Tiny, Low-Power, Low-Cost, ARM Linux Desktop

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Linux

When it comes to Linux-friendly hardware vendors one of my favorite companies to deal with at Phoronix is CompuLab. The Israeli PC vendor isn't just rebadging some OEM systems and slapping on a Tux sticker nor are they assembling some x86 systems that individuals could easily build at a lower cost. We have reviewed several interesting low-power Linux PCs from them in the past and today may be one of their most interesting products yet, the Freescale i.MX6-based Utilite. In this review is a look at the Utilite Pro, which is my new favorite pre-assembled ARM Linux desktop.

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First impressions of Antergos installation

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Linux

One of the amazing things about Linux is the fact that there is always something new out there to learn. A new package manager, a different desktop environment, a different philosophy, a completely different ethos.

While you never quite start from scratch, there can be a significant learning curve when approaching a new distribution, and particularly when you enter a radically different paradigm.

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Is the x86 server ready for open source?

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Linux
OSS

This week theCUBE covered the Open Compute Project Summit (#OCPSummit). As the name implies, this conference is part of the open source movement, but with a twist. When most people hear “open source” they think software — Linux, OpenStack, KVM and other major open source projects. This conference is about open source hardware, and in particular, x86 servers.

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February 2014 Issue of Linux Journal: Web Development

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Linux

Spiders are really cool. Granted, they're terrifying, but they're still
really cool. They keep the pest population down, they create super heroes,
and they socialize with little girls eating curds and whey, but most
impressively, they make webs.
Their
ability to develop such intricate and useful constructions with nothing
more than spinnerets and a little ingenuity is impressive. Also impressive
is the ability for programmers to develop applications for
our Web, the
World Wide Web, and make them accessible instantly to anyone on the planet.
Applications usually take more than one evening to build, but with this
issue of Linux Journal, we hope to make your Web-weaving a little more
efficient, and your Web a little more awesome.

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What will drive mainstream desktop Linux?

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Linux

There are a couple significant reasons why Linux is a distant third, which I've covered elsewhere. However, one important area that needs to be addressed, which I haven't covered before, is product development. I'm going to pretend that I am a NFL analyst assessing each Linux distro's product and explaining what each distro needs to improve on to be appealing enough for the average consumer. Now when I go through this analysis, I need to assess each distro as if I am buying a branded PC with that distro. Why? Because that's how most consumers expect to purchase a PC. The difficult part with a lot of the Linux distros is that there is not that "appliance" that "works out of the box" perception that consumers get when they use it. After all, many people are used to using Windows PCs, Macs, and tablets that just work, including apps that came with each device. They expect that same kind of reliability when they use any PC. So let's start the analysis with the latest device that comes very close to that, which is the Chromebook.

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Cloud Migration Service Shifts From IBM i To Linux

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Linux

Even though we don't talk about it much, there are companies throwing in the towel and looking for IT solutions that do not include IBM i, Power Systems, or IBM. One of the companies with a track record of working in the IBM i migration business is Infinite Corporation, which last week introduced a new cloud-based migration plan called Infinite i. It will compete head-to-head with IBM i-based clouds.

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Debian 7: MATE

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Linux

In our last episode, I had decided that I was going to do a clean install of Debian 7 on the new computer. What I really want is to install the MATE desktop (pronounced Ma-Tay). I've liked MATE a lot since using it with Linux Mint -- but Debian doesn't (yet) make a MATE install disk. For Debian 7, the choices are Gnome 3, KDE 4, LXDE, or XFCE. I did not want to install all the baggage of Gnome or KDE. And I'm already using LXDE, which is clean and fast. So that's what I installed as my starting point.

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Download Linux Kernel 3.14 Release Candidate 1

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Linux

Linux kernel 3.14 RC1 includes updated drivers, architecture updates (ARM mostly, x86, PowerPC, s390, mips, and ia64), core kernel improvements, networking, mm, tooling, etc.

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Developer Prepares uTorrent GTK Client for Linux, Are You Interested?

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Linux

At the moment, the uTorrent server for Linux only has a web-based user interface that doesn’t allow users to click magnet links in web pages in order to add them to the download queue. So, if GuTorrent becomes reality, it will be the first ever graphical client for the uTorrent server, a.k.a. the first ever uTorrent client for Linux.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Is there need for Red Hat Certification training in Zimbabwe?
    A local institution is investigating the need to train Systems Administrators/Engineers who use Linux towards Red Hat certifications. The course is targeted at individuals with at least 2 years experience using Linux.
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) By The Numbers: Valuation in Focus
  • Fedora @ Konteh 2017 - event report
    This year we managed to get a booth on a very popular student job fair called Konteh. (Thanks to Boban Poznanovic, one of the event managers)
  • Fedora 26 Alpha status is NO-GO
    The result of the second Fedora 26 Alpha Go/No-Go Meeting is NO-GO. Due to blockers found during the last days [1] we have decided to delay the Fedora 26 Alpha release for one more week. There is going to be one more Go/No-Go meeting on the next Thursday, March 30th, 2017 at 17:00 UTC to verify we are ready for the release.
  • Fedora 26 Alpha Faces Another Delay
    Fedora 26 was set back by a delay last week and today it's been delayed again for another week. Fedora 26 Alpha has been delayed for another week when at today's Go/No-Go meeting it was given a No-Go status due to outstanding blocker bugs.

GNOME News: Gtef, GNOME 3.24 Release Video, Epiphany 3.24

  • Gtef 2.0 – GTK+ Text Editor Framework
    Gtef is now hosted on gnome.org, and the 2.0 version has been released alongside GNOME 3.24. So it’s a good time for a new blog post on this new library.
  • GNOME's GTK Gets Gtef'ed
    Developer Sébastien Wilmet has provided an overview of Gtef with this text editing framework having been released in tandem with GNOME 3.24. Gtef provides a higher level API to make it easier for text editing or in developer-focused integrated development environments.
  • The Official GNOME 3.24 Release Video Is Here
    By now you’re probably well aware that a new update to the GNOME desktop has been released — and if you’re not, where’ve you been?! GNOME 3.24 features a number of neat new features, welcome improvements, and important advances, most of which we’ve documented in blog posts during the course of this week.
  • A Web Browser for Awesome People (Epiphany 3.24)
    Are you using a sad web browser that integrates poorly with GNOME or elementary OS? Was your sad browser’s GNOME integration theme broken for most of the past year? Does that make you feel sad? Do you wish you were using an awesome web browser that feels right at home in your chosen desktop instead? If so, Epiphany 3.24 might be right for you. It will make you awesome. (Ask your doctor before switching to a new web browser. Results not guaranteed. May cause severe Internet addiction. Some content unsuitable for minors.)

today's howtos

AMDGPU Vega Patches and AMD Open-Sources Code

  • More AMDGPU Vega Patches Published
    Less than one week after AMDGPU DRM Vega support was published along with the other Vega enablement patches for the Linux driver stack, more Direct Rendering Manager patches are being shot out today.
  • AMD have announced 'Anvil', an MIT-licensed wrapper library for Vulkan
    AMD are continuing their open source push with 'Anvil' a new MIT-licenses wrapper library for Vulkan. It's aim is to reduce the time developers spend to get a working Vulkan application.
  • AMD Open-Sources Vulkan "Anvil"
    While waiting for AMD to open-source their Vulkan Linux driver, we have a new AMD open-source Vulkan project to look at: Anvil. Anvil is a project out of AMD's GPUOpen division and aims to be a wrapper library for Vulkan to make it easier to bring-up new Vulkan applications/games. Anvil provides C++ Vulkan wrappers similar to other open-source Vulkan projects while also adding in some extra features.