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Linux

How did the Outreach Program for Women work out for the Linux kernel this year?

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Linux

The Linux Foundation became a sponsor for the FOSS Outreach Program for Women earlier this year, choosing seven interns to hack on the Linux kernel from June through September. And, the results are in: the intern group ranked among the largest contributors to Linux kernel 3.12.

I asked Lisa Nguyen, one of the seven women interns, what it was like to work full time on the Linux kernel, with Linux developers, remotely for four months. In this interview, Lisa shares with me why she didn't tell anyone she was applying, what surprised her most about hacking on the kernel, and why she gets up in the morning hungry for more.

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The Linux kernel community learns how to grow more penguins

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Linux

The Linux kernel is one of the largest and most successful open source projects today. This level of participation and volume of activity is unprecedented, and serves as a model to which most open source projects aspire to. Time has truly been good to Linux and the kernel community, and with time inevitably comes change. This a good thing. One change happening now to the Linux kernel community is a shift in the demographics of the members.

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Tizen camera debuted, Lite tipped, phone delayed

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Linux

There was Tizen news aplenty at the Tizen Developer Summit including a Tizen 2.2.1 release, new details on Tizen 3.0, a Tizen-based Samsung NX300M camera, and an upcoming Tizen Mobile Lite version for low-end phones. Yet, there was no sign of the Tizen phone, and a Samsung executive was quoted as saying that the first Tizen phone would be delayed until 2014.

When the Tizen phone failed to make an appearance at Samsung’s Developer Conference in late October, there was still hope that Samsung would unveil a phone at the Tizen Developer Summit held Nov. 11-12 in Seoul, Korea. Day one, however, came and went with plenty of Tizen goodies, including a Samsung camera running Tizen, but no Tizen phone. Meanwhile, The Korea Herald quoted a Samsung executive as saying the first phone would be delayed until 2014.

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Pear OS 8 Screenshot Tour – Beautiful and Unoriginal

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Linux

Pear OS 8, a distribution based on Ubuntu and Debian that aims to make it easier for Mac OS users to switch to Linux, was released only one day ago, and now it's time to take a closer look at it.

Pear OS 8 is host to a number of unique applications developed specifically for this Linux distribution, and Mac OS users will easily recognize the designed used by Apple.

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Also: Pear OS 8

Point Linux 2.2 - Is there life on Mars?

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Linux

Point Linux 2.2 is a welcome blast from the past with the way it looks. It reminds you of how good things were back when Gnome 2 was prominent.

The performance of Point Linux on the Toshiba Satellite Pro that I am using is excellent.

I didn't come across any issues whilst using Point Linux and the experience has been really good.

There is one thing I would like to add though. If I could go back to any point in time in my past then it would be either the 1970s or the 1980s.

I like the 1970s because in my head it would be like "Life on Mars" and I like the 1980s because I have lived through it once already and life seemed easier back then.

The truth is the reason why I would be happy back in the 1980s is because I know what happened and during my 1980s nothing bad happened.

The same can be said of Ubuntu back at version 10.04. I used it. I remember it well. It was great, it was stable and I really liked it and I know nothing bad happened whilst I used it.

Is that a good enough reason to go back in time?

Unity, Cinnamon, Gnome 3. They have all added something new and they are clearly the future of Linux. (Ok KDE as well, if you must).

Point Linux is like a time machine. It gives me back a really good operating system which works in a way I used to work. Do I still want to work that way? I am not quite sure.

Taking it on face value, Point Linux is a really nice operating system that performs well, is easy enough to navigate and has no real major issues. If that is what you need then it is well worth a shot.

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10-Way AMD & NVIDIA OpenCL GPU Linux Tests

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Linux

For some weekend Linux benchmarking we tossed six NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards against four AMD Radeon graphics cards to get some idea for how the new OpenCL Linux benchmarks are running via the Phoronix Test Suite.

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Red Hat Delivers More Tools, Services for Enterprise OpenStack

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Linux

Red Hat has a sterling reputation for advancing and supporting Linux in the enterprise, but the company is structuring much of its future growth around cloud computing, and OpenStack in particular. The company has recently announced the Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform, an Infrastructure-as-a-Service certification program for OpenStack, a deepening partnership with Canonical and Ubuntu surrounding the new Havana release of OpenStack, and more.

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NVIDIA Dropping 32-bit Linux Support For CUDA

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Linux

If you are reliant upon NVIDIA's CUDA computing parallel computing platform, hopefully you're running 64-bit Linux. NVIDIA announced their plans on Friday to deprecate the 32-bit Linux x86 CUDA Toolkit and the 32-bit Linux CUDA driver.

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Alpine Linux Reaches Version 2.7.0 with OpenSSH 6.4

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Linux

On November 8, Natanael Copa has announced the immediate availability for download of the Alpine Linux 2.7.0 operating system for servers.

Alpine Linux 2.7.0 is a major release that includes some of the latest Linux technologies, as well as the newly released OpenSSH 6.4 software, a SSH protocol suite of network connectivity tools.

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Dev kit runs Linux on 1.2GHz quad-core ARM SoC

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Linux

MSC announced a Linux-ready development kit for a new Qseven format computer-on-module (COM) featuring single-, dual-, or quad-core Freescale i.MX6 Cortex-A9 based system-on-chips clocked at up to 1.2GHz. The kit includes a 3.5-inch SBC form factor baseboard with real-world I/O connectors, Yocto-built embedded Linux on a bootable SD card, and a DC power supply, and is available with optional LCD panels.

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Red Hat and Fedora

Technical
  • Red Hat Takes OpenShift Dedicated to Google Cloud Platform
    Red Hat has steadily taken significant steps in the cloud computing arena, expanding the focus of its OpenShift open source Platform-as-a-Service hybrid cloud computing offering, including launching a cloud-hosted commercial edition called OpenShift Online. Now, the company has announced the availability of OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform. The new offering brings Red Hat’s container platform as a managed service offering to enterprise customers who want to build, launch, and manage applications on OpenShift Dedicated with Google Cloud Platform as their underlying cloud infrastructure. With the availability of OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform, users can speed adoption of containers, Kubernetes, and cloud-native application patterns, according to Red Hat. Users also get access to Google’s global, container-optimized infrastructure and can more easily augment their applications with Google’s ecosystem of data analytics, machine learning, compute, network, and storage services.
  • Red Hat Launches OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform
    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the general availability of OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform. The new offering brings Red Hat’s award-winning container platform as a managed service offering to enterprise customers who want to build, launch, and manage applications on OpenShift Dedicated with Google Cloud Platform as their underlying cloud infrastructure. With the availability of OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform, users can speed adoption of containers, Kubernetes, and cloud-native application patterns, benefiting from Red Hat’s deep enterprise experience. Users also benefit from Google’s global, container-optimized infrastructure and can more easily augment their applications with Google’s ecosystem of data analytics, machine learning, compute, network, and storage services.
  • Image Gallery: Synnex Cloud Catalyst Conference Featuring Red Hat, XMedius, Plantronics
Financial Fedora/Community
  • Fedora 23 End of Life
    With the recent release of Fedora 25, Fedora 23 will officially enter End Of Life (EOL) status on December 20th, 2016. After December 20th, all packages in the Fedora 23 repositories will no longer receive security, bugfix, or enhancement updates, and no new packages will be added to the Fedora 23 collection. Upgrading to Fedora 24 or Fedora 25 before December 20th 2016 is highly recommended for all users still running Fedora 23.
  • What Is Wayland and What Does It Means for Linux Users
    Fedora 25 is now out. People are buzzing, as the team have decided to make Wayland the default graphical session going forward. For many Linux users Wayland is a new term that has popped up, but one that they do not understand. In this article we’ll briefly go over what Wayland is, what it does, and why developers are flocking to it in droves! What exactly is Wayland? Let’s find out!
  • Korora 25 is Ready
    The Korora Project has released version 25 (codename "Gurgle") which is now available for download. As usual, you can find a list of already known problems at the common F25 bugs page.
  • Fedora Design Interns Update
  • Holiday Break 2016.
    It’s sad I don’t get more time to post here these days. Being a manager is a pretty busy job, although I have no complaints! It’s enjoyable, and fortunately I have one of the best teams imaginable to work with, the Fedora Engineering team.

openSUSE Says Goodbye to AMD/ATI Catalyst (fglrx) Proprietary Graphics Drivers

openSUSE developer Bruno Friedmann, informed the community of the openSUSE Linux operating system about the fact that he's planning to remove the old ATI/AMD Catalyst (also known as fglrx) proprietary graphics drivers. Read more

Maximizing the benefits of open source in IoT

With the dawn of the Internet of Things, software is making its way into every product, into every industry. And along with software come developers, who bring their beliefs, attitudes, expertise, and habits along with them. One of those is open source technology — a staple in the software industry since the 1980s, but a new and often scary concept for many traditional industries, whose businesses are built on protecting their assets and intellectual property. In this article, we will illustrate how open source technologies permeate every part of the IoT development stack, and outline how open source can be used as a means of market control as well as a booster of innovation and a way to tap into the IoT developer talent pool. The data have been collected from 3,700 IoT developers in 150 countries across the globe, surveyed in Q4 2015 and shines a light on how big a deal open source really is in IoT, why developers love it, and how companies can create a successful commercial strategy around the use of open source by aligning themselves with the values of that core stakeholder group that are developers. Read more