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Linux

Jeff Hoogland On the Future of & Life After Bodhi

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Interviews

Unlike many Linux developers, he doesn’t earn his living in the software business — not entirely anyway. He’s a mathematician by trade, who pays his room and board as an adjunct faculty member teaching mathematics at ITT Technical Institute in Springfield, Illinois.

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Linux 3.19-rc4

Filed under
Linux

Another week, another -rc.

Things have remained reasonably calm, although we also had a few
last-minute MM regressions. Happily, most of them got fixed really
quickly, with one remaining arm64 issue still pending.

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LibreCalc, The 3D Printed Linux Calculator

Filed under
Linux

I use the calculator function on my smart phone to figure out bill payments or anticipate paycheck amounts, mainly. But there was a time, years ago, when I did use a calculator for math class and standardized exams. It was essential to have one for a period in high school, and for my friends who pursued mathematics in college, they could be counted on to be carrying one in their backpacks. What use would a calculator with a 3D printed case and free, open source software have in the era of the smart phone? That’s a good question to ask since the LibreCalc is a new open source, programmable calculator with a downloadable design available now.

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Nope. Munich Never Happened. – Deny, Deny, and Deny Some More

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Businesses can and do run GNU/Linux on their clients, especially if they are thin clients, they use web-applications or a GNU/Linux application will do the jobs businesses need done.

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Manjaro Linux - Works For Me!

Filed under
Linux

Enter Manjaro Linux. This was one of the last distros I’d tried during my hopping days that I really thought had some potential. Based on Arch, which has a lot going for it to begin with, and with extremely well written and maintained documentation and helpful forums, Manjaro is an attractive option, maybe even for the Linux neophyte. I liken it to what Mint does for Ubuntu, in that it polishes things up nicely, adds some useful software out of the box, and makes the installation a breeze. Arch itself can be a scary install requiring lots of reading and step by step, piece by piece building of your system. Manjaro does most of the dirty work for you, especially if you know which desktop you want from the get-go. I knew I wanted KDE, so I grabbed that and was off to the races.

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Linux Mint 17.1 "Rebecca" KDE Release and Screenshots

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

4MPlayer Is a Live Linux Distro That Transforms Your PC into a Media Player

Filed under
GNU
Linux

4MPlayer is a very interesting Linux distribution that has only one particular function, to become a player for your CD / DVD drive. It might not seem like much, but there isn't anything actually quite like it.

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Laying To Rest That Odd Linux Kernel Regression

Filed under
Development
Linux

Former Red Hat employee Dave Jones has provided some closure to that Linux 3.18 kernel bug that was initially viewed as a "worrisome regression" and turned out to be very difficult to track with no official fix within the mainline Linux kernel.

The bug wasn't fixed for Linux 3.18 final but various other bugs / potentially bad code was cleaned-up in the process of tracking down and isolating this lock-up issue that Dave Jones first reported on one of his systems. The bug went unresolved and at the end of December is when Dave Jones left Red Hat and had to return his hardware -- including the affected system.

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Blocks Wearables is building a modular smartwatch that you can customize any way you want

Filed under
Android
Linux
Gadgets

Earlier this year, a company called Blocks Wearables announced intentions to build its own modular smartwatch called Blocks. Here at CES, the company is showing off some very early prototypes and mock-ups of what Blocks might eventually look like and how it could work.

Blocks Wearables was exhibiting at Intel's massive booth on the CES show floor as one of the participants in the company's "Make it Wearable" competition — and while we couldn't actually get a sense for what using the Block will be like, we did get a good idea of how the whole modular smartwatch concept could play out.

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Tizen Common with Wayland and Linux kernel 3.10 running on Firefly RK3288 with Rockchip ARM SoC

Filed under
Linux

Tizen Common is a baseline Operating system that other profile / devices can be targeted off like mobile, wearable , IVI (In-Vehicle-Infortainment). Leon Anavi has been working on porting Tizen Common 3.0 to the Firefly-RK3288 development board.

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Why Everyone should know vim

Vim is an improved version of Vi, a known text editor available by default in UNIX distributions. Another alternative for modal editors is Emacs but they’re so different that I kind of feel they serve different purposes. Both are great, regardless. I don’t feel vim is necessarily a geeky kind of taste or not. Vim introduced modal editing to me and that has changed my life, really. If you have ever tried vim, you may have noticed you have to press “I” or “A” (lower case) to start writing (note: I’m aware there are more ways to start editing but the purpose is not to cover Vim’s functionalities.). The fun part starts once you realize you can associate Insert and Append commands to something. And then editing text is like thinking of what you want the computer to show on the computer instead of struggling where you at before writing. The same goes for other commands which are easily converted to mnemonics and this is what helped getting comfortable with Vim. Note that Emacs does not have this kind of keybindings but they do have a Vim-like mode - Evil (Extensive Vi Layer). More often than not, I just need to think of what I want to accomplish and type the first letters. Like Replace, Visual, Delete, and so on. It is a modal editor after all, meaning it has modes for everything. This is also what increases my productivity when writing files. I just think of my intentions and Vim does the things for me. Read more

Graphics: Intel and Mesa 18.1 RC1 Released

  • Intel 2018Q1 Graphics Stack Recipe
    Last week Intel's Open-Source Technology Center released their latest quarterly "graphics stack recipe" for the Linux desktop. The Intel Graphics Stack Recipe is the company's recommended configuration for an optimal and supported open-source graphics driver experience for their Intel HD/UHD/Iris Graphics found on Intel processors.
  • Mesa 18.1-RC1 Released With The Latest Open-Source 3D Driver Features
    Seemingly flying under our radar is that Mesa 18.1 has already been branched and the first release candidate issued. While the Mesa website hasn't yet been updated for the 18.1 details, Dylan Baker appears to be the release manager for the 18.1 series -- the second quarter of 2018 release stream.