Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux

The release of 3.16 Linux Kernel – the kernel column

Filed under
Linux

As we were going to press, Linus Torvalds announced the 3.16 Linux kernel, saying “So nothing particularly exciting happened this week [since the final 3.16 Release Candidate 7 from a week prior], and 3.16 is out there.” In his announcement email, Linus noted that the timing of 3.16 was, perhaps, a little unfortunate for the impact upon the merge widow for 3.17. The “merge window” is the period of time early in a (roughly) two month kernel development cycle during which disruptive kernel changes are allowed to take place. Typically, the merge window is capped at a couple of weeks, and it immediately follows a final release (from the previous kernel development cycle). Therefore, the merge for 3.17 is open just as Linus (and others) are preparing to head to Chicago for the 2014 Kernel Summit (and LinuxCon conference). Linus says, “So we’ll see how the next merge window goes, but I’m not going to worry about it overmuch. If I end up not having time to do all the merges, I might delay things into the week of the Kernel Summit, but I’ll hope to get most of the big merging done this upcoming week before any travel takes place.”

Read more

Cloud Host Linode Adds Professional Services Support Option

Filed under
Linux

The move follows Linode's announcement earlier this summer that it would slash cloud-hosting prices and introduce high-end hardware to its storage and computing infrastructure, which transformed the company from a cloud host focused on providing Linux-based infrastructure that would appeal to a technically savvy crowd committed to open source hardware, to one that now offers broader hosting options and is seeking to stand out from the crowd through high-end infrastructure and sophisticated support solutions.

Read more

The Story Behind 'init' and 'systemd': Why 'init' Needed to be Replaced with 'systemd' in Linux

Filed under
Linux

A init process starts serially i.e., one task starts only after the last task startup was successful and it was loaded in the memory. This often resulted into delayed and long booting time. However, systemd was not designed for speed but for getting the things done neatly which in turns avoid all the UN-necessary delay.

Read more

Cumulus Networks Partners for Open Source Networking OS

Filed under
OS
Linux
OSS

Cumulus Networks, which develops Cumulus Linux, describes its product as "the industry's first, full-featured Linux operating system for networking hardware." That's a debatable claim, mostly because "full-featured" is a term that may be interpreted in myriad ways, and because Linux-based operating systems tailored for networking hardware have been around in various forms for decades. But with a focus on hardware-agnosticism and a commitment to supporting a broad range of applications, all while maintaining a Debian Linux-based platform that is not watered-down to the bare essentials, Cumulus is doing some new things in an old niche.

Read more

HP announces two new ultra-thin Chrombooks

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

HP has announced two new ultra-thin Chromebooks – the 11-inch HP Chromebook and full-size 14-inch HP Chromebook.

Read more

Running Your Business on Linux (No, You Don't Need Windows)

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Believe it or not, my dear Linux friends, a lot of IT pros still believe they need Windows servers. They have this goofy idea that Active Directory, SharePoint, Exchange, Windows Server, SQL Server, and all the other members of the lardy malware vector family are the only proper business backends. They have this funny notion that Microsoft servers are easier to run. I must refute this odd notion with reality: they are not. They are expensive, troublesome, less-capable, and pointy-clicky does not equal easier to use, nor does it negate having to possess actual skills and knowledge.

Read more

Calculate Linux 14 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We are happy to announce the release of Calculate Linux 14.

Read more

Matthew Garrett's Advice on Hardware, Linux Kernel Careers, and Fruit Flies

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

The most popular questions posed to Linux kernel developer Matthew Garrett during his Reddit AMA this week related to kernel hacking and hardware issues. But Garrett, a senior security engineer at Nebula, answered frankly on a variety of subjects that ranged from technical issues in the kernel, to his workstation setup, to how to kill fruit flies and why he likes the movie Hackers. Here is a digest of some of the more kernel-related questions and answers (plus a fruit fly question, for more flavor.)

Read more

MIPS aims new 64-bit Warrior cores at mobile devices

Filed under
Android
Linux

Imagination announced a 64-bit Warrior processor with a MIPS I6400 core that features hardware virtualization, multi-threading, and multi-clustering.

Imagination unveiled its I-Class Warrior processor featuring a new family of 64-bit MIPS I6400 cores, thereby filling in the high end of its Warrior family. The new I6400 cores are primarily designed for SoCs used in servers and networking gear, and much like earlier MIPS64 cores have been used in Linux-oriented system-on-chips like Cavium’s carrier-grade Octeon III or Broadcom’s XLR. However, for the first time, 64-bit MIPS cores are also being promoted as a mobile solution.

Read more

Red Hat Developers Introduce New Tool For Linux Storage Management

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

The lid has been lifted on blivet-gui, a new open-source storage tool designed by Red Hat for configuring disks and file-systems.

Red Hat decided to develop a new GUI-driven utility for storage management on Fedora/RHEL as GParted, one of the popular programs for disk management on Linux, doesn't support all of the technologies found in modern Linux distributions. The utility is named blivet-gui as it uses the Blivet Python library used for storage configuration. Red Hat's Anaconda installer is already using Blivet for its storage configuration during installation so this new tool should integrate well with their stack.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

The Linux Kernel Is Still Rectifying The Year 2038 Problem

The Linux kernel is still working to rectify the Year 2038 problem whereby the time values stored as signed 32-bit integers will wrap around. If you somehow are not familiar with the Year 2038 "Y2038" problem, you can learn more via Wikipedia. The Linux kernel has been receiving fixes and workarounds for years now through many Y2038 commits to work through the many different areas of the kernel that are relying upon 32-bit signed ints for storing time values. With Linux 4.15, this work has continued. Read more

Linux 4.15 Is A Huge Update For Both AMD CPU & Radeon GPU Owners

Linux 4.15 is shaping up to be a massive kernel release and we are just half-way through its merge window period. But for AMD Linux users especially, the 4.15 kernel release is going to be rocking. Whether you are using AMD processors and/or AMD Radeon graphics cards, Linux 4.15 is a terrific way to end of the year. There are a number of improvements to make this release great for AMD customers. Read more

Announcing Season of KDE 2018

KDE Student Programs is pleased to announce the 2018 Season of KDE for those who want to participate in mentored projects that enhance KDE in some way. Every year since 2013, KDE Student Programs has been running Season of KDE as a program similar to, but not quite the same as Google Summer of Code, offering an opportunity to everyone (not just students) to participate in both code and non-code projects that benefits the KDE ecosystem. In the past few years, SoK participants have not only contributed new application features but have also developed the KDE Continuous Integration System, statistical reports for developers, a web framework, ported KDE Applications, created documentation and lots and lots of other work. For this year’s Season of KDE, we are shaking things up a bit and making a host of changes to the program. Read more

How To Get Started With The Ubuntu Linux Distro

The Linux operating system has evolved from a niche audience to widespread popularity since its creation in the mid 1990s, and with good reason. Once upon a time, that installation process was a challenge, even for those who had plenty of experience with such tasks. The modern day Linux, however, has come a very long way. To that end, the installation of most Linux distributions is about as easy as installing an application. If you can install Microsoft Office or Adobe Photoshop, you can install Linux. Here, we'll walk you through the process of installing Ubuntu Linux 17.04, which is widely considered one of the most user-friendly distributions. (A distribution is a variation of Linux, and there are hundreds and hundreds to choose from.) Read more