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Linux Release Delay

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Linux
  • Linus Torvalds decides world doesn't need a new Linux today

    Those waiting for the milestone that would have been version 4.10 of the Linux kernel have another week to wait, after Linus Torvalds decided not to release the final version this week.

    “Hey, it's another week, and I could have released the final 4.10,” Torvalds posted to the Linux Kernel Mailing List, adding that “... I wouldn't have felt bad about just doing the final release today.”

  • Ten Exciting Features Of The Linux 4.10 Kernel

    The Linux 4.10 kernel didn't end up being released today, but was pushed back by an extra week. However, in looking forward to next weekend, here are ten of the features that excite us about Linux 4.10.

The Best Operating System for Linux Gaming: Which One Do You Use and Why?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

In the last few months, we tried multiple GNU/Linux distributions for gaming purposes, and we have arrived at the conclusion that there's no perfect operating system out there designed for Linux gaming.

We all know that the world of gaming is split between Nvidia and AMD users. Now, if you're using a Nvidia graphics card, even one from five years ago, chances are it's supported on most Linux-based operating systems because Nvidia provides up-to-date video drivers for most, if not all of its GPUs.

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Linux poll results: And the winners are...

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Slackware!? Yes, one of the oldest of Linux distributions won with just over 16 percent of the vote.

If that sounds a little odd, it is. On DistroWatch, a site that covers Linux distributions like paint, the top Linux desktop distros are Mint, Debian, Ubuntu, openSUSE, and Manjaro. Slackware comes in 28th place.

So why the discrepancy? With more than double the votes for any category, it appears there was vote-stuffing by Slackware fans.

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Linux 4.10-rc8

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Linux

Hey, it's another week, and I could have released the final 4.10.

It's not been all that busy, although we did have a number of small
last-minute regression fixes (some just reverting stuff that caused
problems and needed more thought, others fixing things). But nothing
out of the ordinary, and I wouldn't have felt bad about just doing the
final release today.

But I decided that there's also no huge overriding reason to do so
(other than getting back to the usual "rc7 is the last rc" schedule,
which would have been nice), and with travel coming up, I decided that
I didn't really need to open the merge window. I've done merge windows
during travel before, but I just prefer not to. If it was the second
week of the merge window when the big bulk of stuff had been merged,
that would be one thing, but that's not how the schedule turned out.

Read more

Also: Linux 4.10-rc8 Kernel Released, Final Pushed Out By One Week

Linux Kernel 4.10 Delayed by a Week, Last Release Candidate Is Now Available

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Vulkan 1.0.40 Released With Fixes, SMPTE 2086 HDR Metadata Support
  • Intel's Linux Graphics Driver To Enable Atomic Support By Default

    The patch landed in Intel's drm-intel-next-queued branch this week for enabling atomic support by default on the hardware platforms where it's fully supported.

    Following this mailing list discussion, atomic support is now being turned on by default for the Intel Linux DRM driver while it's disabled-by-default support has been in good shape since Linux ~4.9. Though due to the timing of this change-over, this looks like it will be a change for Linux 4.12 as Intel's 4.11 DRM feature work is already over with the 4.11 merge window being imminent.

  • X.Org Server 1.20 Breaks The Video Driver ABI

    Just a quick note for anyone who routinely builds the latest X.Org Server from Git, the video driver ABI has been broken again, thus you'll need to rebuild your dependent DDX drivers assuming they have been modified for this new ABI.

Wine and Games

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming
  • Wine Staging 2.1 Adds Improvements to the CSMT Patchset, Based on Wine 2.1

    The Wine Staging team announced today, February 9, 2017, the availability of the Wine Staging 2.1, a development release that implements various improvements and addresses numerous issues.

    Coming hot on the heels of Wine 2.1, on which it's based, the Wine Staging 2.1 release has revamped the CSMT (Command Stream Multithreading) patchset, which is the application's number one functionality, used for using the available GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) and CPU (Central Processing Unit) more efficiently by moving the execution of OpenGL commands to a separate thread, to support Direct3D 10 and 11.

  • Old School RTS Make a Comeback (on Linux too)

    We had already mentioned that Cossacks would be coming on Linux – it’s been on Windows since last year (2016) and for a long time we had no news about when it would appear on Linux, but it seems now that the date is fixed – it will be released on the 15th of March 2017 both on Mac and Linux.

  • Civilization VI: Quick Port Report

    So Civ VI should be out now by the time you read this, and we have had a couple of days on the beta before the release. After spending about 4 hours on the game, it’s wayyyyyy too early to have any definitive opinion about how good Civ VI really is (and what the additions of districts, civics tree and envoys actually bring), but we can at least say how good the port looks so far, in single-player mode. First, the first thing you will notice is the first, dark loading screen – at least during the first load. It’s been quite long on my hardware (i5 3.4 Ghz with GTX970, 8GB RAM, 1080p screen), more than a minute – it reminds me a lot of Mankind Divided in that sense. Note that this is not unique to Civ VI, Civ V had a pretty long loading screen as well. But once the game is loaded it’s about it, so it’s not that bad. And subsequent loads were shorter.

Microsoft 'Loves' Linux in Munich

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

RecalboxOS and PiE-Ink

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • [Older] RecalboxOS – Raspberry Pi Gaming System

    If you are interested in gaming then you should look into the RecalboxOS which runs on the Raspberry Pi. RecalboxOS has numerous console emulators and even provides Kodi which is a media center for playing videos, music, pictures, games and more. This article will cover the installation and configuration of the gaming system and not Kodi.

  • PiE-Ink is a Raspberry Pi name tag that uses an e ink display

    In today’s maker edition of “why didn’t we think of that before?”, we have a customisable name tag based on a Raspberry Pi hooked up to an e ink display.

    The “PiE-Ink” was created by user “esper2142“, who is quickly identified as Josh King, a systems engineer at Cisco thanks to the included demo video.

Desktop GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • GNU/Linux Now Accepted

    I don’t know much about Southern USA, but in Canada I taught in many remote schools in the North and over a decade or so, it became unsurprising to find one or more students in my classes who had experienced desktop GNU/Linux. They may not have known much about it but they weren’t put off by it. It just worked for them. Usually, they had been in a big city school somewhere and brought the knowledge back with them. That familiarity helped ease student populations to accept GNU/Linux.

  • Hasta la vista, Vista

    Microsoft will stop all support for Windows Vista in two months, ending the problem-plagued operating system's usefulness when it issues final patches on April 11.

    The OS won't be missed: According to analytics vendor Net Applications, which estimated user share by counting unique visitors to tens of thousands of websites, Vista ran on less than 1% of all personal computers powered by Windows last month. Still, even that small percentage translated into approximately 14 million PCs when using Microsoft's claim that 1.5 billion devices run Windows.

  • Linux flagship Munich's U-turn: Install Windows 10 everywhere by end of 2020 [Ed: An attack by Microsoft-connected Accenture in Munich shows that Microsoft VERY much hates GNU/Linux]

    According to Kirschner, Munich's IT problems are not so much down to the use of free software as they are the result of poor management and organizational structure, a view backed up by Accenture's study.

  • Munich Said To Be Moving Away From Linux/LiMux, Back To Microsoft

SemiCode OS Might Be Your Next Development Platform

Filed under
GNU
Linux

One thing about Linux is that it’s very coder-friendly. Why? Simple: Nearly any developer can have every tool they need at their fingertips with ease and little to no cost. Tools like gcc, make, Bluefish, Atom, vi, emacs… the list goes on and on and on.
Many of these tools are ready to serve, via a quick install from either your package manager or by downloading them, individually, from their respected websites. But what if you wanted all of those tools, at the ready, on a single, programmer-friendly platform? If the thought of having every tool you need to develop, pre-installed on a Linux distribution, appeals to you, there’s a new platform in the works that might fit your needs to perfection. That distribution is SemiCode OS.

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Ten Years as Desktop Linux User: My Open Source World, Then and Now

I've been a regular desktop Linux user for just about a decade now. What has changed in that time? Keep reading for a look back at all the ways that desktop Linux has become easier to use -- and those in which it has become more difficult -- over the past ten years. I installed Linux to my laptop for the first time in the summer of 2006. I started with SUSE, then moved onto Mandriva and finally settled on Fedora Core. By early 2007 I was using Fedora full time. There was no more Windows partition on my laptop. When I ran into problems or incompatibilities with Linux, my options were to sink or swim. There was no Windows to revert back to. Read more