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Mozilla and Linux Foundation Advance New Trends in Open Source Funding

Filed under
Linux
Moz/FF
OSS

Who pays for open source development? Increasingly, large organizations like Mozilla and the Linux Foundation. That's the trend highlighted by recent moves like the expansion of the Mozilla Open Source Support (MOSS) project.

The Mozilla Foundation has long injected money into the open source ecosystem through partnerships with other projects and grants. But it formalized that mission last year by launching MOSS, which originally focused on supporting open source projects that directly complement or help form the basis for Mozilla's own products.

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Review: Rebellin Linux v3 GNOME

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Linux
GNOME
Reviews

Last week, I finished and passed my generals! This not only means that I can continue doing research here with a roof over my head and with money to feed myself; it also means that I now have the time to get back to doing reviews and posting about other things here. I'm starting this week by reviewing Rebellin Linux.

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Manjaro Linux 16.06 Release Candidate 1 Is Out with Linux Kernel 4.6 Support

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Today, May 16, 2016, Philip Müller proudly announced the availability of the first Release Candidate (RC1) build of the highly anticipated Manjaro Linux 16.06 "Daniella" computer operating system based on Arch Linux.

Early adopters can now jump into the Manjaro Linux 16.06 RC bandwagon and take the upcoming for a test drive on their personal computers, as the team of skilled developers led by Philip Müller have done a great job in the past few months to make the Arch Linux-based distro as stable and reliable as possible.

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Raspberry Pi Zero, the $5 Computer, Now Ships with a Built-in Camera Connector

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Linux

Approximately half a year after its launch, during which time every single copy was sold, the $5 computer, Raspberry Pi Zero, makes a comeback with a built-in camera connector.

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Work begins on Russian rival to Android

Filed under
OS
Linux

The advertiser is a company called Open Mobile Platform, founded just last month. The company is pitching the Linux-based system as something for large enterprises and privacy wonks who are seeking "trusted" mobile solutions.

It will initially be offered in Russian to meet local demands and regulatory requirements before being pitched overseas.

The operating system is reportedly built on top of the Sailfish OS, a production of Finnish company Jolla, which was formed by former Nokia engineers.

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Linux Australia hosting woes to continue under current mindset

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Last month, the Linux Australia secretary, Sae Ra, posted to the publicly-available Linux-aus mailing list that the organisation's website had been disrupted due to hosting changes. Under its current mindset, this problem is only bound to re-occur.

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Also: Krita 2016 Fundraiser

Linux Kernel 4.6

Filed under
Linux

Kernel Space/Linux

Filed under
Linux

4MLinux 18.0 Launches July 1, 2016, First Beta Release Is Out for Public Testing

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Following on last week's release of 4MLinux Core 18.0 Beta distrolette, Zbigniew Konojacki today informs Softpedia about the availability for public testing of the Beta release of the upcoming 4MLinux 18.0 operating system.

As expected, 4MLinux 18.0 Beta is out today based on the 4MLinux Core 18.0 edition, which is, in fact, the base of all the rest of the 4MLinux sister projects, including, but not limited to, 4MRescueKit, 4MParted, and 4MRecover.

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Kernel Space/Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • Keynote: Linus Torvalds in Conversation with Dirk Hohndel
  • ZFS On Linux 0.6.5.7 Brings Linux 4.6 Support, Bug Fixes

    ZFS On Linux 0.6.5.7 was released this week as the newest version of the ZFS file-system code for Linux.

  • Touch on Linux is a little Touchy

    Before you come bashing at me saying “East or West, Keyboard is the best” or “Command Line! Command Line! Command Line!”, I just want to interate here – YES, keyboard is very important for productive tasks. But what about when you just want to use your hybrid device (which are slowly starting to dominate the market) to read a book? Or watch a movie? Or do some GUI based task – like even editing a video (which is a fairly heavy task but can be an excellent use case for touch based interaction)? Yes, Linux is, in my humble opinon, much more flexible than Windows when it comes to doing non-touch tasks like coding, or writing documents (which is exactly why inspite of all that Windows-praising, I am typing this on LibreOffice in Ubuntu), but let us not forget, touch is slowly but steadily becoming the future of interacting with our personal devices. Maybe it will never be the most productive way of doing so, but it sure is the most natural way of doing that. I think Linux should not find itself late to the party of touch-based interaction.

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Security Leftovers

Leftovers: Gaming

openSUSE 42.2 Alpha1, Not Just for Nerds, Rebellin Impressin'

Today in Linux news Ludwig Nussel announced the release of openSUSE Leap 42.2 Alpha1. In other news, Jack Germain was impressed with Rebellin Linux from the start and blogger DarkDuck said CentOS isn't for home users. Mozilla' Asa Dotzler returns to Firefox and Richard Smith said Linux is "not just for computer nerds" anymore. Ludwig Nussel today announced openSUSE Leap 42.2 Alpha1 saying this release is mainly 42.1 plus updates and SLE12SP2 Beta1, Qt 5.6, and Linux 4.4. He hopes another alpha will land before the upcoming openSUSE conference and having a developmental release every month until Final in November. Test hounds can still check the installer and hardware support. While 42.2 is supposed to be a minor update, big changes are coming in YaST, X, KDE, GNOME and systemd. Read more

Is Ubuntu's Convergence the Future of Linux?

Convergence is not a word on everybody's lips. But if Canonical Software, the company that controls Ubuntu, has any say, it soon will be. Others may be more skeptical. Canonical describes convergence as "a single software platform that runs across smartphones, tablets, PCs, and TVs. It is designed to help make converged computing a reality: one system, one experience, multiple form factors." Read more