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Linux Devices

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Linux
  • SiFive brings open-source SoCs
  • Startup SiFive Aims for Open-Source Chips
  • First SoCs based on open source RISC-V run Linux

    SiFive unveiled the first embedded SoCs based on the open source RISC-V platform: A Linux-ready octa-core Freedom U500 and a FreeRTOS-based Freedom E300.

    A VC-backed startup closely associated with the RISC-V project announced the first system-on-chip implementations of the open source RISC-V processor platform. At the RISC-V 4thWorkshop at MIT this week, SiFive announced two embedded SoC families. The Freedom Unleashed family debuts with a 28nm fabricated, Freedom U500 SoC with up to eight 1.6GHz cores that runs Linux, aimed at machine learning, storage, and networking applications. The MCU-like Freedom Everywhere family for Internet of Things starts with a 180nm Freedom E300 model that runs FreeRTOS.

  • Server class COM supports 16-core Xeons, packs dual 10GbE

    Advantech’s server-class SOM-5991 COM Express module runs Linux on up to 16-core Xeon D-1500 processors, and offers dual 10GBase-KR ports and PCIe with NTB.

    We’ve seen a number of embedded boards supporting server-class Xeon E3-1200 SoCs from Intel’s Skylake architecture, such as Seco’s COMe-B09-BT6 COM Express Basic Type 6 module. Yet, Advantech’s SOM-5991, which uses the same 125 x 95mm Basic Type 6 form factor, is the first we’ve seen to run the similarly 14nm “Broadwell” based Xeon D-1500 SoCs, which are available with up to 16-core Xeons. Advantech claims it’s the first COM Express to use the Xeon D-1500, which debuted over a year ago, with more models arriving last fall and earlier this year.

Budgie Desktop 10.2.6 Comes with Redesigned Budgie Menu, Spotify Compatibility

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GNU
Linux

Today, July 12, 2016, Softpedia was informed by Solus project leader Ikey Doherty about the general availability of the Budgie 10.2.6 desktop environment, a major release that introduces lots of new features and improvements.

Coming three and a half months after the release of Budgie 10.2.5, which most of the Solus users are using on their computers, the Budgie 10.2.6 update promises many goodies. But first, the biggest change is the implementation of a stable, performant API/ABI, which will force those who maintain Budgie extensions to rebuild them based on the new API/ABI.

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Linux Kernel 4.4.15 LTS Adds Many Updated USB Drivers, It's Already in Solus

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Linux

After announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.6.4, which is now the most advanced stable kernel branch available, Greg Kroah-Hartman informed the community about the release of Linux kernel 4.4.15 LTS.

The Linux 4.4 kernel series is an LTS (Long Term Support) one, which means that it will be supported with security patches and bug fixes for a few more years than the normal Linux kernel branches. Because of this, many popular GNU/Linux operating systems prefer to use it, no matter if they are following a static or rolling release model. Among these, we can mention Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), Arch Linux, and Solus.

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32-Bit Ubuntu Alternatives

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Linux
Ubuntu

Some folks may find the idea of using a 32-bit distribution of Linux to be downright silly. After all, we live in a 64-bit world these days, right? Well, that depends on who you ask. The fact of the matter is there are still a lot of fully functional PCs out there that run 32-bit Linux. Up until recently, this was all well and good. Then the news came down that Ubuntu would no longer be supporting 32-bit systems come the next Ubuntu release. Clearly not everyone is thrilled about his news.

Rather than throw in the towel and recycle these PCs, I think it's important to realize there is a world beyond Ubuntu. Yes, many other distros have also stopped support 32-bit distros. However for the time being, there are still options to choose from. In this article, I'm going to share some great non-Ubuntu based 32-bit friendly Linux distros you should check out.

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Linux Kernel 4.6.4 Released with Networking Improvements and Updated Drivers

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Linux

Today, July 11, 2016, renowned Linux kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman has had the great pleasure of announcing the release of the fourth maintenance update for the Linux 4.6 kernel series.

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Also: Linux 4.6.4

Linux 4.4.15

Linux Mint 18: The best desktop -- period

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Linux

You could keep worrying about being forced to upgrade to Windows 10, or you could try the best of all Linux desktops: Mint 18.

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Dear Valve and Steam Machines OEMs, you have it all wrong

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

Most of us reading this site want Steam Machines to do well. Not all of us will be interested in buying the hardware, but we're aware that its success is also tied to the success of Linux as a gaming platform, which is why I'm pretty miffed that the OEMs and Valve have messed it up.

Valve have done well with the controller and with making SteamOS pretty coherent and user-friendly, but messed it up when it came to defining what a Steam Machine actually is, leaving it open to interpretation. I've said this time and time again, but the original Steam Machines line-up was a complete mess. We had everything from $1500 PCs to ludicrously overpriced machines which didn't even have discreet graphics cards.

Even the best offerings fall short. Alienware's cheapest offering comes in at $450 (this should be the ideal price point in my opinion), but offers a mere 4GB RAM. If you want to scale this up to 8GB, you have to pay $750 since it also means upping the CPU to an i5. Does a GTX 960 need an i5 to do its thing? No, not really. You might get a few extra frames or do better in a more CPU-intensive game, but if one tries to step outside the worldview of a PC gamer and into one of a console gamer, then it doesn't take long to realise that those $200 aren't worth it, but $20 for an extra stick of 4GB RAM would be worth it.

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Torvalds Leftover

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Linux
  • Linus Torvalds Announces The Last RC, Linux Kernel 4.7 To Be Released On July 24

    Linus Torvalds has just announced the availability of the seventh Release Candidate (RC) of the forthcoming Linux 4.7 kernel branch.

    Except for a couple of regressions, things look to have calmed down for Linux 4.7. According to Linus Torvalds, this could just be the last RC for Linux kernel 4.7, which means that the final release will be announced on July 24, 2016.

  • Linus Torvalds goes on epic rant over Linux devs' comment syntax

    Linus Torvalds has launched an epic, yet entertaining, rant against Linux kernel maintainers over their use of syntax in code comments.

    Torvalds, who is the chief maintainer of the Linux kernel, has a record for no-nonsense posts to the army of coders who keep the operating system going.

    The comments are a key means by which developers can follow and understand code across the community.

  • Linus Torvalds goes off on one over comment syntax

    LINUS TORVALDS, the creator and chief maintainer of Linux, as well as the author of some entertaining online rants, has complained to the community about comment syntax styles.

    Torvalds was commenting in response to a proposal to standardise on a syntax style used to add comments which he described as "brain-damaged stupid".

Linus Torvalds in sweary rant about punctuation in kernel comments

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Linux

Linus Torvalds has unleashed a sweary rant on the Linux Kernel Mailing List, labelling some members “brain-damaged” for their preferred method of punctuating comments.

“Can we please get rid of the brain-damaged stupid networking comment syntax style, PLEASE?” the Linux Lord asked last Friday.

“If the networking people cannot handle the pure awesomeness that is a balanced and symmetric traditional multi-line C style comments, then instead of the disgusting unbalanced crap that you guys use now, please just go all the way to the C++ mode.”

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Open is the solution to improving 21st century education

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Dale Raby: How do you Fedora?

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Ubuntu GNOME 16.04.1 LTS Released but Still Doesn't Uses the GNOME 3.20 Stack

As we reported last week, Canonical published the first point release of its long-term supported Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, offering users new installation mediums with all the updates made available since April 21, 2016. Read more

KDE Applications 16.08 Software Suite Is in Beta, Final Release Coming August 18

Now that the third and last maintenance update of the KDE Applications 16.04 software suite has debuted, it's time for us to take the Beta build of the next major KDE Applications release for a test drive. Read more