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Linux

You can now install Debian Linux apps directly from your Chromebook’s Files app

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Linux
Debian

Last month, XDA-Developers spotted a string of commits on the Chromium Gerrit which indicated of an upcoming support for easy installation of Linux apps on compatible Chrome OS devices. The commits suggested that Debian (.deb) files will be clickable from the Files app, which will then trigger the installation. Now a recent commit confirms that Google is indeed adding a file handler for Debian packages within the Chrome OS Files app.

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Cinnamon 4.0 Desktop Environment Promises to Be Fast and Have No Screen Tearing

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Linux

The recently released Linux Mint 19 "Tara" operating system features the latest Cinnamon 3.8 desktop environment, which promised to enable faster launching of apps and be more snappier than previous releases. After users' reactions, Linux Mint devs now decided to continue improving Cinnamon on this front for the next major release, Cinnamon 4.0, due for release this year.

Among the "snappiness" improvements they'll want to implement in the upcoming Cinnamon 4.0 desktop environment, Clement Lefebvre mentioned the removal of Vsync to eliminate a slight delay noticed when dragging a window with the mouse cursor, as well as to use "Force Composition Pipeline" in Nvidia Settings for Nvidia graphics cards to eliminate screen tearing.

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Linux Mint Updates

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GNU
Linux
  • [Linux Mint] Monthly News – July 2018

    A mistimed MESA update in Xenial temporarily broke Ubuntu and Linux Mint upgrades. We were able to block it on the 7th of July, and ask people to revert the upgrade with Timeshift. On the 9th, everything was resolved, and the upgrade path was fixed and re-opened.

    More recently, a grub update triggered an issue in one of our own packages. That issue could only be triggered by a new grub update and so it had gone undetected during QA and the BETA test. Although it was fixed in a matter of hours in the repositories, it still affects our installation ISO images and it breaks EFI installations when the live session is connected to the Internet. The release notes were updated to ask people to install offline. New 64-bit ISO images for Linux Mint 19 Cinnamon, MATE and Xfce were produced with the fixed package and they passed QA yesterday. These new ISOs will replace the current images in the days to come.

    Be careful with Kernel 4.15.0-24. A critical issue causes some computers to boot really slowly, or not to boot at all. Ubuntu is aware of it and working on a fix. We’ve also received negative feedback from the 4.15 kernel series in Mint 18.x (based on Ubuntu Xenial). Although Ubuntu decided to switch the HWE series towards it, the 4.15 series doesn’t appear to support some proprietary drivers yet (nvidia-3.04 and nvidia-340 among them).

    We’re also aware of regressions in the Bionic base affecting VPN, Samba, Wine (recently fixed). Ubuntu 18.04 is a brand new base and we’re sure it will settle, receive bug fixes and get more mature with time.

    Of course our attention is mostly focused on the problems and we quickly forget about all the improvements. We had a great Linux Mint 19 release, we also received a huge amount of positive feedback and we’ve seen many great changes when moving from 16.04 to 18.04.

  • Linux Mint Debian Edition 3 Is On The Way, Cinnamon 4.0 Working On Speed

    The Linux Mint team has shared a routine status update about the work they have been engaged in over the past month, including dealing with some nasty package updates and readying the beta of Linux Mint Debian Edition 3 (LMDE 3).

    This month they had to deal with some headaches causing issues stemming from Ubuntu stable release updates around Mesa and GRUB in particular. There's also been a kernel problem to deal with, among other regressions. But for those that are fans of Linux Mint Debian Edition whereby the distribution uses a Debian based over Ubuntu LTS, the LMDE 3 release is on the way. The developers believe the LMDE 3 Beta should surface by the end of July. Additionally, they plan to ship LMDE 3 both with their own live installer as well as a Calamares-based installer option.

  • Free eBook from Packt - Linux Mint Essentials

Fact check: Linux developer accused of pedophilia in fake blog posts

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Linux

Followers of some of Reddit’s Linux-devoted subreddits were recently greeted with an unusual and disturbing discovery: pro-pedophilia and anti-Semitic blog posts from the developer of Linux Exherbo, a Linux distribution with native cross-compiling package management.

A website under the developer’s name featured a number of unsavory blog posts. Fortunately, the blog appears to be fake.

The developer, Bryan Østergaard, normally posts updates to a LiveJournal page under the username kloeri, although the last update dates 2014. Earlier this week, someone shared to Reddit a different blog attributed to Østergaard with a handful of more recent blog posts explaining “why” he decided to create Exherbo.

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Linux Foundation Expansion and Linux Development

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Linux
  • Deutsche Telekom signs up as platinum member of Linux Foundation Networking

    Deutsche Telekom has doubled down on its commitment to using open source by signing up as a platinum member of Linux Foundation Networking.

    Earlier this year, the Linux Foundation put some of its open source communities, including the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP), under the Linux Foundation Networking (LFN) brand in order to foster cross-project collaboration. Mainly thanks to ONAP, the LNF projects currently enable close to 70% of all the world's global mobile subscribers.

  • Deutsche Telekom Joins The Linux Foundation, Deepens Investment in Open Source Networking
  • Samsung Galaxy S Support With The Linux 4.19 Kernel

    Just in case you have your hands still on the Samsung Galaxy S or Galaxy S 4G that were released back in 2010 as once high-end Android smartphones, they have DeviceTree support with the upcoming Linux 4.19 kernel cycle.

    The DeviceTree additions are currently staged ahead of the Linux 4.19 kernel for these S5Pv210 Aries based smartphones. With this code in place for Linux 4.19, the Galaxy S should at least see working mainline support for storage, PMIC, RTC, fuel gauge, keys, USB, and WiFi working in order.

  • Using the Best CPU Available on Asymmetric Systems

    This is the type of situation with a patch where it might look like a lack of opposition could let it sail into the kernel tree, but really, it just hasn't been thoroughly examined by Linux bigwigs yet. Once the various contributors have gotten the patch as good as they can get it without deeper feedback, they'll probably send it up the ladder for inclusion in the main source tree. At that point, the security folks will jump all over it, looking for ways that a malicious user might force processes all onto only one particular CPU (essentially mounting a denial-of-service attack) or some such thing. Even if the patch survives that scrutiny, one of the other big-time kernel people, or even Linus Torvalds, could reject the patch on the grounds that it should represent a solution for large-scale systems as well as small.

    Either way, something like Dietmar and Quentin's patch will be desirable in the kernel, because it's always good to take advantages of the full range of abilities of a system. And nowadays, a lot of devices are coming out with asymmetric CPUs and other quirks that never were part of earlier general-purpose systems. So, there's definitely a lot to be gained in seeing this sort of patch go into the tree.

Stable kernel 4.4.142

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Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.4.142 kernel.

It's not an "essencial" upgrade, but a number of build problems with
perf are now resolved, and an x86 issue that some people might have hit
is now handled properly. If those were problems for you, please
upgrade.

The updated 4.4.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.4.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

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Kernel: Linux 4.19 and LWN Coverage Unleashed From Paywall

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Linux
  • Linux 4.19 To Feature Support For HDMI CEC With DP/USB-C To HDMI Adapters

    Adding to the big batch of feature additions and improvements queuing in DRM-Next for the upcoming Linux 4.19 kernel merge window is another round of drm-misc-next improvements.

    While the drm-misc-next material consists of the random DRM core and small driver changes not big enough to otherwise warrant their own individual pull requests to DRM-Next, for Linux 4.19 this "misc" material has been fairly exciting. Last week's drm-misc-next pull request introduced the Virtual KMS (VKMS) driver that offers exciting potential. With this week's drm-misc-next pull are further improvements to the VKMS code for frame-buffer and plane helpers, among other additions.

  • Nouveau Changes Queue Ahead Of Linux 4.19

    Linux 4.19 is going to be another exciting kernel on the Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) front with a lot of good stuff included while hours ago we finally got a look at what's in store for the open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver.

    Nouveau DRM maintainer Ben Skeggs of Red Hat has updated the Nouveau DRM tree of the latest batch of patches ahead of sending in the pull request to DRM-Next. As has been the trend in recent times, the Nouveau DRM work mostly boils down to bug/regression fixes.

  • IR decoding with BPF

    In the 4.18 kernel, a new feature was merged to allow infrared (IR) decoding to be done using BPF. Infrared remotes use many different encodings; if a decoder were to be written for each, we would end up with hundreds of decoders in the kernel. So, currently, the kernel only supports the most widely used protocols. Alternatively, the lirc daemon can be run to decode IR. Decoding IR can usually be expressed in a few lines of code, so a more lightweight solution without many kernel-to-userspace context switches would be preferable. This article will explain how IR messages are encoded, the structure of a BPF program, and how a BPF program can maintain state between invocations. It concludes with a look at the steps that are taken to end up with a button event, such as a volume-up key event.

    Infrared remote controls emit IR light using a simple LED. The LED is turned on and off for shorter or longer periods, which is interpreted somewhat akin to morse code. When infrared light has been detected for a period, the result is called a "pulse". The time between pulses when no infrared light is detected is called a "space".

  • The block I/O latency controller

    Large data centers routinely use control groups to balance the use of the available computing resources among competing users. Block I/O bandwidth can be one of the most important resources for certain types of workloads, but the kernel's I/O controller is not a complete solution to the problem. The upcoming block I/O latency controller looks set to fill that gap in the near future, at least for some classes of users.

    Modern block devices are fast, especially when solid-state storage devices are in use. But some workloads can be even faster when it comes to the generation of block I/O requests. If a device fails to keep up, the length of the request queue(s) will increase, as will the time it takes for any specific request to complete. The slowdown is unwelcome in almost any setting, but the corresponding increase in latency can be especially problematic for latency-sensitive workloads.

Speech to Text conversion in Linux

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Linux

This is how you can convert speech to text in Linux systems using Google Docs. There are not much speech recognition software available in Linux systems including native desktop apps. There are some apps available which uses IBM Watson and other APIs to convert speech to text but they are not user-friendly and requires advanced level of user interactions e.g. little bit of programming or scripting in respective languages.

However not many users know that Google Docs provides an advanced level of Speech Recognition using its own AI technologies which can be accessed via Chrome in Google Docs. Any category of user can use this feature to convert speech to text and this requires no advanced level of computer knowledge. The best thing about this feature of Google Docs is you can use it in any Ubuntu derivatives, any Linux distributions including Windows where Chrome is available.

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How to add Linux to your Chromebook

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Linux
HowTos

It's long been possible to run Linux on a Chromebook. That's no surprise. After all, Chrome OS is a Linux variant. But, doing it by using either Crouton in a chroot container or Gallium OS, a Xubuntu Chromebook-specific Linux variant, wasn't easy. Then, Google announced it was bringing a completely integrated Linux desktop to the Chromebook.

Today, with a properly-equipped Chromebook and the bravery to run canary code, you can run Debian Linux on your Chromebook. Here's how to do it.

This new Chromebook Linux feature is Crostini, the umbrella technology for getting Linux running with Chrome OS. Crostini gets enough Linux running to run KVM, Linux's built-in virtual machine (VM). On top of this, Crostini starts and runs LXC containers. You won't see it, unless you look closely, but it's in those containers that your Debian Linux instances are running.

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Linux File Server Guide

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Linux

Linux file servers play an essential role. The ability to share files is a basic expectation with any modern operating system in the workplace. When using one of the popular Linux distributions, you have a few different file sharing options to choose from. Some of them are simple but not that secure. Others are highly secure, yet require some know-how to set up initially.

Once set up on a dedicated machine, you can utilize these file sharing technologies on a dedicated file server. This article will address these technologies and provide some guidance on choosing one option over another.

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Review: Peppermint OS 9

While I have to admit that I am not the target audience for a distribution focused on web-based applications, I found Peppermint 9 to be a solid distribution. Despite pulling components from multiple desktop environments, Peppermint 9's desktop is well integrated and easy to use. It was also easy to add both web-based and traditional applications to the system, so the distribution can be adjusted for users who prefer either. Peppermint 9 is not for everyone, but users who do most their work in Google Docs or Microsoft Office Online should give Peppermint a try. However, users accustomed to using traditional desktop applications might want to stick to one of the many alternatives out there. Yes, Peppermint 9 can be easily adjusted to use traditional desktop applications, but many of the other distribution options out there come with those kinds of applications pre-installed. Read more

A Major GNOME Icon Redesign is Getting Underway

Your favourite GNOME applications will soon have dramatically different icons. GNOME devs are redesigning the default icons for all GNOME core apps as part a wider overhaul of GNOME design guidelines. The move hope to make it easier (and less effort) for app developers to provide high-quality and useful icons for their software on the GNOME desktop. Not that this redesign is much a surprise, as the Adwaita folder icons we highlighted a few weeks back suggested a new tack was being taken on design. With the GNOME desktop environment shipping on the Purism Librem 5 smartphone, the timing of this revamp couldn’t be better. Read more

Linux 4.17.9, 4.14.57, 4.9.114, 4.4.143, and 3.18.116