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NuTyX 11 available with cards 2.4.96

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I'm very please to announce the new NuTyX 11 release.

The NuTyX 11 is a complete recompilation of all the available binaries on NuTyX.

Since everything has been recompiled, most of the packages have been update as well.

The base of NuTyX comes with the new kernel LTS 4.19.28 and the very new kernel 5.0.3.

The toolchain is completely rebuild around glibc 2.29, gcc 8.3.0 and binutils 2.32.

The graphical server is now in xorg-server 1.20.4, the mesa lib in 18.3.4, gtk3 3.24.3, qt 5.12.1.

The python 3.7.2 and 2.7.16 are updated as well

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Also new: Feren OS 19.03 Run Through

Linux Foundation and Servers Leftovers

Filed under
Linux
Server
  • How Open Source Is Accelerating NFV Transformation

    Red Hat is noted for making open source a culture and business model, not just a way of developing software, and its message of open source as the path to innovation resonates on many levels.

    In anticipation of the upcoming Open Networking Summit, we talked with Thomas Nadeau, Technical Director NFV at Red Hat, who gave a keynote address at last year’s event, to hear his thoughts regarding the role of open source in innovation for telecommunications service providers.

    One reason for open source’s broad acceptance in this industry, he said, was that some very successful projects have grown too large for any one company to manage, or single-handedly push their boundaries toward additional innovative breakthroughs.

  • Why The CDF Launch From Linux Foundation Is Important For The DevOps And Cloud Native Ecosystem

    Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery (CI/CD) has become an essential building block of modern application lifecycle management. This technique allows business to increase the velocity of delivering software to users. Through CI/CD, what was once confined to large, web-scale companies became available to early-stage startups and enterprises.

  • Five layers of security for Red Hat Data Grid on OpenShift

    Red Hat Data Grid is an in-memory, distributed, NoSQL datastore solution. With it, your applications can access, process, and analyze data at in-memory speed to deliver a superior user experience. In-memory Data Grid has a variety of use cases in today’s environment, such as fast data access for low-latency apps, storing objects (NoSQL) in a datastore, achieving linear scalability with data distribution/partitioning, and data high-availability across geographies, among many others. With containers getting more attention, the need to have Data Grid running on a container platform like OpenShift is clear, and we are seeing more and more customers aligning their architecture with a datastore running natively on a container platform.

    In this article, I will talk about multiple layers of security available while deploying Data Grid on OpenShift. The layers of security offer a combination of security measures provided by Data Grid as well as by OpenShift/Kubernetes.

  • Rebooting UUCP to redecentralize the net

    UUCP (Unix-to-Unix Copy Protocol) is a venerable, non-hierarchical networking protocol that was used as transport for early email and Usenet message boards; its intrinsic decentralization and its cooperative nature (UUCP hosts store and forward messages for one another) make it a kind of symbol of the early, decentralized robustness that characterized the early net and inspired so much optimism about a fundamentally distributed arrangement of peers rising up to replace the top-down phone companies and other centralized systems.

    As part of the decentralized web movement, UUCP has been rebooted by Dataforge, a Fort Worth, Texas-based "hybrid shell provider/tilde server" whose proprietor Wesley "praetor" Banderia uses his decades of Unix systems administration to keep the system running on a cluster of lovingly maintained vintage SGI machines with a Google Cloud VPS for backup.

Octavo Systems Shows Off With Deadbug Linux Computer

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Once upon a time, small Linux-capable single board computers were novelties, but not anymore. Today we have a wide selection of them, many built around modules we could buy for our own projects. Some of the chipset suppliers behind these boards compete on cost, others find a niche to differentiate their product. Octavo Systems is one of the latter offering system-in-package (SiP) modules that are specifically designed for easy integration. They described how simple it would be to build a minimal computer using their SC335x C-SiP, and to drive the point home they brought a deadbug implementation to Embedded World 2019. [Short video after the break.]

Most of us encounter Octavo modules as the heart of a BeagleBoard. Their increasing integration made tiny wonders like PocketBeagle possible. But bringing out all those pins for use still required a four-layer circuit board. Octavo’s pitch for hardware professionals center around how easy integration saves time for faster time to market, and fortunately for us easy integration also translates to a more accessible device for our projects. It’s one thing to publish a document describing a hypothetical single-layer PCB for an Octavo module, it’s quite something else to show that concept in action with no PCB at all.

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Sailfish OS Oulanka is now available

Filed under
OS
Linux

The new software release, Sailfish OS Oulanka is now available! This time, the name for Sailfish OS 3.0.2 update was inspired by one of our sailor’s favorite locations: Oulanka National Park.
Oulanka is a national park in Lapland and Northern Ostrobothnia regions of Finland, covering 270 km². This park is known in Finland by adventurers due to it is famous trekking route, Karhunkierros, a four day – eighty kilometer route – located in Oulanka and accessible all year round. Oulanka was the first of the two Finnish national parks to become part of World Wide Fund for Nature’s PAN Parks.

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7 Great XFCE Themes for Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Gnome might be the de-facto default desktop for many Linux distributions, but that doesn’t mean it’s everyone’s favorite. For many Linux users that distinction goes to XFCE. While it’s not as lightweight as it used to be, XFCE remains a favorite among users who want their desktop environment to stay out of their way.

Just because you want a relatively minimal desktop doesn’t mean you want it to be ugly. Looking to spice up the look of your XFCE installation? You have plenty of options.

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Linux 5.1-rc2

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.1-rc2

    Well, we're a week away from the merge window close, and here's rc2.
    Things look fairly normal, but honestly, rc2 is usually too early to
    tell. People haven't necessarily had time to notice problems yet.
    Which is just another way of saying "please test harder".

    Nothing particularly stands out. Yes, we had some fixes for the new
    io_ring code for issues that were discussed when merging it. Other
    than that, worth noting is that the bulk of the patches are for
    tooling, not the core kernel. In fact, about two thirds of the patch
    is just for the tools/ subdirectory, most of it due to some late perf
    tool updates. The people involved promise they're done.

  • Linux 5.1-rc2 Kernel Released

    Linus Torvalds has announced the second weekly release candidate for Linux 5.1.

    Linux 5.1-rc2 is looking "fairly normal" but then again with being the trailing week after a busy merge window, it's difficult to tell how the rest of the cycle will pan out.

    Linus noted in the 5.1-rc2 announcement that nothing particular stands out but there are fixes to the io_uring code and other improvements merged over the past week.

Linux Foundation: CommunityBridge, Continuous Delivery Foundation and Zowe

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • CommunityBridge gives better visibility into open source code [Ed: CommunityBridge gives Microsoft more control]

    “The Linux Foundation has done a fantastic job at bringing a diverse ecosystem on to one platform designed to mutualize resources,” said Eiso Kant, co-founder, and CEO of source{d}. “We’re thrilled to collaborate with the Open Source community and surface insights everyone needs to better manage, develop or contribute to their respective project codebases.”

    As a recent example, source{d} analyzed the Kubernetes project reporting that as it nears 2 million lines of code (including all languages and generated files), the 4-year-old open source project is showing many signs of maturity. The velocity of commits for the core Kubernetes project seemed to be slowing down as the community focus moves to infrastructure testing, cluster federation, Machine Learning, and HPC (High-Performance Computing) workloads management. With just under 16,000 methods, the Kubernetes API also seems to be stabilizing despite its high level of complexity.

  • The Continuous Delivery Foundation - what will it bring to DevOps?
  • Inside the new Continuous Delivery Foundation

    Does the world need yet another open source foundation? That is a question that was posed to the founding members of the CDF - the Continuous Delivery Foundation - which recently formed as an addition to the roster of sub-groups beneath the Linux Foundation.

    Skeptics might be brought over by the fact that Jenkins, Jenkins X, Netflix and Google's Spinnaker and Google's Tekton projects have all found themselves at the heart of the initiative, which is aimed at "developing, nurturing, and promoting open source projects, best practices and industry specifications" related to continuous delivery - in other words, speedy software cycles that are at the heart of the devops motto to 'fail fast'.

  • Open Source Project Fosters Data Teamwork Best Practices
  • Mainframe DevOps Using Zowe Open Source

    This session will demonstrate how to use the Zowe open source framework to extend modern devops tooling and practices to the mainframe and to enhance the mainframe developer experience. A follow-up to the overview session, the hosts will drill into the Zowe architecture while demoing key capabilities including the command line interface (CLI) and API Mediation Layer.

Chrome OS to bring Android VPN support for Linux apps on Chromebooks

Filed under
OS
Android
GNU
Linux
Google
Security

Back in February, I noted that the Chromium team was working to add VPN support in Linux containers running on Chromebooks. Now there appears to be a second VPN option in the works: As spotted by 9to5 Google, there’s an effort to extend any Android-based VPN apps to Linux.

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Also: Guide to reasonable privacy on Android

Linux To Add Support For The MOTU 8Pre Digital Audio Workstation Hardware

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

The MOTU 8Pre is a Firewire-connected device for digital audio workstations to be able to connect eight microphone inputs. The hardware itself is more than one decade old and in fact the manufacturer already discontinued the product, but with Linux 5.2 the kernel will be supporting this device.

SUSE developer and Linux sound subsystem maintainer Takashi Sakamoto queued the support this week for supporting the MOTU 8Pre FireWire digital audio workstation device. Details on the support can be found via the enablement patch.

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10 Best lightweight browsers for Linux or Ubuntu

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Web

Web Browsers, the day when they started making our lives easier by allowing us to crawl the internet to today’s world; they have been gone through numerous technological advancements. Browsers are quite advance to handle high-end graphics, online videos, apps and more without the help of third-party software. But this also has made them heavy in terms of consuming hardware resources, means more RAM and storage space. Such kind of browsers works well on good system configuration machines, however, Linux operating systems those are running on old PC or laptops or low configuration systems require light browsers with a minimal approach to work fast.

Mainstream browser or shall I say the dominated one: Google Chrome that Linux users refrain themselves from instaling it on their machines is rather resourced consuming browser. This is the main reason why most of the Linux OS like Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Centos and more come with Firefox Mozilla but somewhere it still not that much lightweight as we need it to be. So, I have done some research and gathered some lightweight Linux browsers.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming: C++, Python and In-house OpenJDK Implementation of Alibaba

  • Next C++ workshop: Pointers and Linked Lists, 28 March at 19:00 UTC
    Another workshop is coming up! Improve your C++ skills with the help of LibreOffice developers: we’re running regular workshops which focus on a specific topic, and are accompanied by a real-time IRC meeting. For the next one, the topics are Pointers and Linked Lists. Start by watching this presentation:
  • Python programming language: Pyboard D-series arrives for MicroPython robots
    The new Pyboard D-series micro-controller is now available for purchase at a rather hefty price of £43 ($56), offering developers a low-powered device for running programs created with MicroPython, a stripped-back version of the hugely popular Python 3 programming language.
  • Commenting Python Code
    Programming reflects your way of thinking in order to describe the single steps that you took to solve a problem using a computer. Commenting your code helps explain your thought process, and helps you and others to understand later on the intention of your code. This allows you to more easily find errors, to fix them, to improve the code later on, and to reuse it in other applications as well. Commenting is important to all kinds of projects, no matter whether they are - small, medium, or rather large. It is an essential part of your workflow, and is seen as good practice for developers. Without comments, things can get confusing, real fast. In this article we will explain the various methods of commenting Python supports, and how it can be used to automatically create documentation for your code using the so-called module-level docstrings.
  • Documenting Python Projects With Sphinx and Read The Docs
  • Django Migrations 101
  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #361 (March 26, 2019)
  • MongoDB connections
  • Alibaba Dragonwell8 : The In-house OpenJDK Implementation At Alibaba
    Alibaba requires no introduction. It is one of the popular and largest multinational conglomerate founded by Jack Ma, a business magnate and philanthropist from China. It is also world’s fifth-largest internet company by revenue. It specializes in various sectors such as e-commerce, retail, Internet and technology. Alibaba team has provided significant contribution to open source projects. One such project is OpenJDK. The development team at Alibaba has developed many Java-based applications over the years. They have adopted OpenJDK and created their own JDK named “Alibaba Dragonwell8”. It is the downstream version of OpenJDK and completely open source. Alibaba Dragonwell is optimized for developing e-commerce, financial, logistics applications which are running on their 100k+ servers. It is certified as compatible with the Java SE standard. It is currently supports Linux/x86_64 platform only. Let us hope they will extend the support to Unix and other platforms soon. In this guide, we will see how to install Alibaba Dragonwell8 in Linux. I have tested this guide on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS server. However, it should work on other Linux distributions as well.

4MLinux 29.0 BETA released.

4MLinux 29.0 BETA is ready for testing. Basically, at this stage of development, 4MLinux BETA has the same features as 4MLinux STABLE, but it provides a huge number of updated packages. Read more

Why We Need Our Nonprofits

SPARC was at best a relatively small success. But RISC did succeed, massively, with ARM (which stands for Advanced RISC Machine). ARM started as the Acorn RISC Machine in 1983. Today, most of the world's mobile devices run ARM chips. I don't know how well the CHIPS Alliance will do, but I do know that only an entity big and experienced enough to pull giant competing companies together can do it. For Linux, that's the Linux Foundation. I'm glad we have it. I'm also glad we have the Software Freedom Conservancy. Times are getting tough for FLOSS, and we need all the help we can get. Read more

See GNOME 3.32 on Ubuntu 19.04 Beta

Although the 19.04 is still not officially released this March, but even today we can download the development version and run it (LiveCD) on our computer. We find that it includes the 3.32, the latest version of GNOME desktop environment. I want to highlight some interesting aspects of it on Ubuntu as we saw it on Fedora Rawhide few days ago. I suggest you to download the 19.04 daily-live ISO and quickly test it, I believe you can feel the performance improvements especially how quick it's now to open the start menu and it's now even quicker to search files on Nautilus. Here we go. Happy testing! Read more