Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux

CoreELEC 9.2.4 Linux Distro Adds ODROID-N2+ and La Frite SBC Support, Kodi 18.8

Filed under
Linux

CoreELEC 9.2.4 is a major update that comes about two months after version 9.2.3 with numerous new features and improvements. First and foremost, this release introduces new hardware support, allowing users to install CoreELEC on new single-board computers, including Libre Computer’s La Frite and ODROID-N2+, along with official support for Beelink and MINIX devices.

It also adds support for new accessories, including the ODROID HiFi-Shields high-resolution Digital to Analog Converter (DAC) and other I2S devices on the ODROID-C4 single-board computer, as well as support for RTL8156 based USB adapters and support for RT5651 analog audio amp used in the MINIX U22X-XJ and Ugoos AM6 Android TV box sets.

Read more

Redo Rescue Backup and Recovery Live System Gets NFS Share Support, SSH Server

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

For those not in the know, Redo Rescue is a great, free and easy to use live Linux system based on Debian GNU/Linux that can help you whenever your computer is broken by letting you backup and restore an entire system in just a few minutes.

For example, if your computer no longer boots after installing the recent BootHole patches for the GRUB2 bootloader, you can use Redo Rescue to repair the boot. Of course, there are a few other tools that can do the same, but Redo Rescue can also do bare metal restores by replacing the MBR and partition table, re-map original data to a different target partition and even verify the integrity of an existing backup image.

Read more

Pocket P.C. design files released as open source (handheld Linux computer)

Filed under
Linux
OSS

The Popcorn Computers Pocket P.C. is designed to be a handheld Linux computer with a 4.95 inch full HD display, a built-in keyboard, and a ARM Cortex-A53 quad-core processor.

First unveiled in November 2019, the Pocket P.C. hasn’t shipped yet. It’s still up for pre-order for $199 and up.

But the developers have already open sourced the hardware by releasing the latest design files. You can find the at the project’s GitHub page.

Read more

Zero Terminal 3 Is A Linux PC With $5 Raspberry Pi & Touchscreen

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gadgets

NODE, a hardware hacker, has developed a modular Linux PC dubbed “Zero Terminal 3” with a touchscreen, a full-size USB 2.0 port, a micro SD socket, and in-built battery running on $5 Raspberry Pi Zero single-board computer.

Aimed at DIY enthusiasts, Zero Terminal 3 is a very versatile device that brings tonnes of options when it comes to adding add-ons to reach its true potential. The developer calls these addons ‘backpacks’ and offers users several options to extend the functionality of the device.

Read more

Also: ClusterCTRL Stack Helps You Power and Cool up to 5 Raspberry Pi SBC’s

Is There Room for Linux Workstations at Your Organization?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Although it's been a long time since Linux was more difficult to use than Windows, most companies have been reluctant to deploy Linux workstations to its employees. That might be changing.

Read more

Best Multimedia Linux distributions

Filed under
GNU
Linux

When choosing the best Linux distribution for your needs, multimedia experts such as video editors and photographers will benefit most from a Linux distro that specializes in multimedia production.

There are a few Linux distrubitions that fill the gap for multimedia gurus, and we're going to cover the top choices in this article. Read below to see our countdown of the five best multimedia Linux distros.

Read more

Char/Misc Is Still Quite Busy With Linux 5.9 Still Lacking An "Accelerator" Subsystem

Filed under
Linux

The "char/misc" area of the kernel continues to be quite busy for Linux 5.9 included as a sort of "catch-all" for the Linux kernel drivers not properly jiving within other areas. While there previously was talk of formally making a hardware accelerator subsystem for the Linux kernel for fitting some of the drivers currently living under char/misc, as of Linux 5.9 that still has not materialized.

With more AI driver work for mainline and new accelerator devices coming to market, the "accelerator" subsystem will surely come in due course but for now the likes of the Habana Labs driver live under the char/misc umbrella.

Read more

Also: ARM Now Defaulting To Schedutil Governor, Other Power Management Work For Linux 5.9

How to Install Latest MS Paint Alternative Pinta in Ubuntu and Other Linux

Filed under
Linux

This guide explains the steps required to install the latest Pinta software in Ubuntu and other Linux distributions such as Linux Mint, Fedora, and others.
Read more

Linux 5.9: Seccomp Notifier, RISC-V and DebugFS

Filed under
Linux

  • The Seccomp Notifier - Cranking up the crazy with bpf()

    The 2. feature just landed in the merge window for v5.9. So what better time than now to boot a v5.9 pre-rc1 kernel and play with the new features.

    I said that these features make it possible to intercept syscalls that return file descriptors or that pass file descriptors to the kernel. Syscalls that come to mind are open(), connect(), dup2(), but also bpf(). People that read the first blogpost might not have realized how crazy^serious one can get with these two new features so I thought it be a good exercise to illustrate it. And what better victim than bpf().

    As we know, bpf() and unprivileged containers don't get along too well. But that doesn't need to be the case. For the demo you're about to see I enabled LXD to supervise the bpf() syscalls for tasks running in unprivileged containers. We will intercept the bpf() syscalls for the BPF_PROG_LOAD command for BPF_PROG_TYPE_CGROUP_DEVICE program types and the BPF_PROG_ATTACH, and BPF_PROG_DETACH commands for the BPF_CGROUP_DEVICE attach type. This allows a nested unprivileged container to load its own device profile in the cgroup2 hierarchy.

  • RISC-V Software Support Adds More Features With Linux 5.9

    More kernel architecture features continue to be supported by the RISC-V code with Linux 5.9.

    Each kernel cycle we have been seeing more RISC-V code get squared away and over the past year has begun running nicely on the likes of SiFive's HiFive Unleashed.

  • Linux 5.9 Exposes Device Link Details Via Sysfs, Allows Hiding DebugFS From User-Space

    There are a few driver core changes for the Linux 5.9 kernel worth mentioning.

    Exciting changes to the core driver infrastructure for the mainline Linux kernel are rare though this time around are a few alterations worth pointing out:

    - The recently covered work by Sony on being able to allow restricting user-space access to DebugFS while keeping the debug feature enabled is in Linux 5.9. While most distributions / Linux configurations already restrict DebugFS access to root / admin privileges, as this file-system often exposes sensitive system information, the change by Sony allows for it to be initialized but not accessible from user-space. Sony's focus on this effort appears to be in line of further securing their Android smartphones.

Screencasts and Audiocasts: GeckoLinux, Linux Headlines and Python

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux

  • GeckoLinux 999.200729.0 "Rolling" overview | Linux for Detail Oriented Geckos

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of GeckoLinux 999.200729.0 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • 2020-08-07 | Linux Headlines

    The Free Software Foundation elects a new president, security researchers warn of an attack related to Spectre and Meltdown that affects even more processor types, Ubuntu 20.04.1 is out, a new tool aims to automatically optimize laptop power without sacrificing battery life, and just two candidates are running for the vacant openSUSE board seat.

  • Test and Code: 125: pytest 6 - Anthony Sottile

    pytest 6 is out. Specifically, 6.0.1, as of July 31.

    And there's lots to be excited about.
    Anthony Sottile joins the show to discuss features, improvements, documentation updates and more.

  • Real Python: The Real Python Podcast – Episode #21: Exploring K-means Clustering and Building a Gradebook With Pandas

    Do you want to learn the how and when of implementing K-means clustering in Python? Would you like to practice your pandas skills with a real-world project? This week on the show, David Amos is back with another batch of PyCoder’s Weekly articles and projects.

    David talks about a Real Python article about how to perform K-means clustering in Python. We also talk about a new project based article on the site about how to create a gradebook using pandas, practicing the skills of importing, merging, and calculating across groups of data. We cover several other articles and projects from the Python community including: JPEG image decoding, object-oriented development with interfaces and mixins, sparking joy with Python, five package picks from Real Python authors, and more.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 08/08/2020 - 8:18pm
Story CoreELEC 9.2.4 Linux Distro Adds ODROID-N2+ and La Frite SBC Support, Kodi 18.8 Rianne Schestowitz 08/08/2020 - 5:50pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 08/08/2020 - 5:48pm
Story KDE Frameworks 5.73 Released with Many Changes to Breeze Icons, Kirigami and KNewStuff Rianne Schestowitz 08/08/2020 - 5:40pm
Story Redo Rescue Backup and Recovery Live System Gets NFS Share Support, SSH Server Rianne Schestowitz 08/08/2020 - 5:36pm
Story Pocket P.C. design files released as open source (handheld Linux computer) Rianne Schestowitz 08/08/2020 - 5:20pm
Story More Progress for Mageia 8 – Beta 1 is available for testing Rianne Schestowitz 2 08/08/2020 - 5:18pm
Story elementary OS 6 Promises New Look and Feel, New Installer, and More Rianne Schestowitz 1 08/08/2020 - 5:16pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 08/08/2020 - 4:28pm
Story Devices: Axiomtek, RasPi and More Roy Schestowitz 08/08/2020 - 4:24pm