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Now firmware can depend on available client features

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

At the moment we just blindly assume the capabilities of the front-end client when installing firmware. We can somewhat work around this limitation by requiring a new enough fwupd daemon version, but the GUI client software may be much older than the fwupd version or just incomplete. If you maintain a text or graphical client that uses fwupd to deploy updates then there’s an additional API call I’d like you to start using so we can fix this limitation.

This would allow, for instance, the firmware to specify that it requires the client to be able to show a runtime detach image. This would not be set by a dumb command line tool using FwupdClient, but would be set by a GUI client that is capable of downloading a URL and showing a PNG to the user.

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Also: LVFS Serves Up Over 17 Million Firmware Files To Linux Users

Linux Cybersecurity: What You Need to Know

Filed under
Linux
Security

More people than ever use Linux. While Windows and macOS still capture most of the market, nearly 2% of all computers use the operating system. While that may not seem like a lot, the usage share has grown immensely over the last few years.

While only 2% of desktop computers use the operating systems, 96.5% of the world’s top million domains are powered by Linux servers. That’s because there’s a lot to love about Linux.

But is Linux safer than macOS and Windows?

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Transmission – A Cross-Platform BitTorrent Client for Linux

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Transmission is a free cross-platform BitTorrent client built to be simple to use, lightweight, secure, and reliable. The open-source BitTorrent client just received a major update since 2018 in the form of version 3.0 and it is now packing a ton of function enhancements, bug fixes, and performance improvements.

The latest Transmission ships with a new app icon on Linux platforms alongside a symbolic variant for indicating the app is running in GNOME’s top panel. Be on the lookout to know whether your theme overrides the display setting if you’re using a custom theme.

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A minimalist Mac terminal for Linux fans

Filed under
Linux

I have a confession to make: I have been a Mac user for more than 10 years now. At first, I felt a little shame, given my strong Linux background, but the Mac gives me a Unix-like shell and a great window manager. Because of that history, I have a mix of features that will run on macOS but feel familiar to Linux users. There's no reason it can't port over to Linux (and it has!)...

For a long time, my preferred terminal was the basic built-in Terminal.app, but I recently switched to iTerm2 because it has much better customization and profile support. One of its key wins for me is that it's easy to transplant settings from Mac to Mac. For daily use, I prefer the Solarized Dark theme, but for presentations, I have a separate profile that enlarges the text and uses a plain black background with more vibrant colors.

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Download Linux Mint 20 LTS Ulyana with Mirrors, Torrents and Checksums

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu
HowTos

Following Ubuntu 20.04 LTS release, quickly this month Linux Mint 20 just released as Long Term Support version codenamed Ulyana with its Cinnamon, MATE, and XFCE editions. This release will be supported for five years until 2025. This list sums up all necessary download links, mirrors, torrents, and checksums. This also includes guides to download via torrents, verify your obtained files, make the installation media and install this friendly and amazing computer operating system. Go ahead!

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Five Favorite Xfce Panel Applets

Filed under
GNU
Linux
HowTos

Here you go, it’s both a bit of a tutorial on how to use Xfce’s panel applets, as well as something of an in-depth look at five of our writer’s favorites.

The Xfce Desktop Environment might be one of Linux’s best kept secrets. Sure, everybody’s heard of Xfce, because on most lists it’s usually the first “alternative” DE, listed right after mainstreamers KDE and Gnome. But unless you’ve actually looked at it or used it, you might think it’s a bare bones simple DE that’s much too basic to be useful.

That’s partially the fault of open source websites, which much to the chagrin of Xfce devs, nearly always refer to it as “minimalist,” or as a desktop intended for older hardware. This leaves some people thinking that Xfce is old school and offers nothing but a bare-bones experience, something like any number of simple Linux windows managers, or even Windows 3.1.

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The 10 Best Gentoo Linux Derivatives To Explore in 2020

Filed under
Linux
Gentoo

Gentoo Linux derivatives can be the ideal choice for the professional Linux users who don’t want to compromise about the system stability and performance. Some of you might know nothing about Gentoo Linux. Unlike other Linux distributions like Ubuntu, Kali, etc., Gentoo is quite unfamiliar...

Only the veteran Linux users know about this. And, the people who know about its potential hardly go back to any other distributions. The exclusivity of the Gentoo Linux is that you need to build the whole flashable image from the source code. That sometimes may require a few days based on your machine’s strength.

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Linux 5.8-rc3

Filed under
Development
Linux

Well, we had a big merge window, and we have a fairly big rc3 here
too. The calm period for rc2 is clearly over.

That said, I don't think there's anything _particularly_ scary in
here, and the size of this rc is probably simply a direct result of
the fact that 5.8 is a big release. It's too early to say if this will
mean that we'll have a longer rc period as a result, I'll just have to
keep an eye out for how this all progresses.

The stats all look fairly normal: about half is drivers (networking is
a big chunk, but there's really a bit of everything in there: gpu,
sound, usb, you name it).

Outside of drivers, we have the usual suspects: arch updates (x86 and
arm stand out), core networking, but also core kernel and VM updates.
And a fair amount of tooling updates (mostly selftests, but also
objtool and virtio).

Go forth and test,

              Linus

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Also: Linux 5.8-rc3 Released - Fairly Big But Not Particularly Scary

Linux in Devices/Embedded: Bootlin, Texas Instruments and Garmin

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Bootlin at the Embedded Linux Conference 2020

    Bootlin has been a participant at the Embedded Linux Conference for many years, and despite the special conditions this year, we will again be participating to this online event, from June 29 to July 1.

  • J721E DRA829/TDA4VM/AM752x – Texas Instruments Cortex-A72 based Monster SoC’s

    Texas Instruments unveiled their first 64-bit processor in 2018 with TI AM654 “Keystone III” quad-core Arm Cortex-A53 + dual lockstep Cortex-R5F processor designed for general embedded and industrial applications.

    The company is now working on a more powerful processor with J721E SoC with Cortex-A72 cores belonging to the K3 Multicore SoC architecture platform appearing in TI Linux git repository. Ti J721E is a monster of an SoC, not necessarily in terms of CPU processing power, but it has an amazing amount of features and peripherals.

  • OpenStreetMap for Garmin Fenix

    I’ve recently bought a Garmin Fenix Multisport Smartwatch. The watch offers support for navigation and maps. By default it came with some topo maps for Europe. However I wanted to use more detailed maps from OpenStreetMap.

    [...]

    Also there had been problems with the map on fenix. The draw order really matters and I needed to draw forests earlier as they didn’t show up on smartwatch, but worked fine when loaded in QMapShack. My current problem is that building aren’t rendered on the device. The question is if we really want them or leave them out.

    [...]

    Just download the file and copy it to the GARMIN folder on the device using MTP. In case you want a map for your region you can build it yourself using the MDE.

Kernel and Graphics: Bcachefs, Macintosh II and Intel Media Driver

Filed under
Linux
  • Bcachefs Linux File-System Seeing Performance Improvements, Other Progress

    While Ubuntu continues in their path of OpenZFS integration, Fedora is revisiting the possibility of using Btrfs on the desktop, Red Hat is continuing to invest in Stratis, and Reiser5 is being developed, Bcachefs as the file-system born out of the Linux block cache code is continuing to evolve.

    It's been some months since there was last any news on Bcachefs while last week marked the first time this year that there's been a status update passed along on the Patreon blog. Bcachefs development continues to be led by Kent Overstreet who wrote the latest status update on this currently out-of-tree file-system.

  • In 2020 The Linux Kernel Is Still Seeing Driver Work For The Macintosh II

    The Linux kernel is seeing some modern work done to its driver for supporting the Apple Desktop Bus on Macintosh II era systems.

    Along with the likes of the Apple PowerBook 100 series seeing Linux driver improvements once in a while, this Sunday developer Finn Thain sent out a set of patches improving the kernel's via-macii driver that contains "fixes for all known bugs" to this driver.

  • Intel Media Driver 20.2.pre4 Brings DG1 Graphics Card Support

    Intel's open-source media team has released a new development snapshot of their media driver that provides GPU-accelerated video encode/decode capabilities on Linux.

    Intel Media Driver 2020Q2 Pre-release 20.2.pre4 is this new version out Sunday. The Intel Media Driver 20.2.pre4 doesn't have any formal change-log but in digging through the recent patches, the big highlight is certainly initial support for the DG1 developer graphics card as the first Xe Graphics dGPU offering, but there are also other changes as part of this 20.2.pre4 release...

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