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10 more essential Linux commands you need to know

Filed under
GNU
Linux
HowTos

When you practice commands that can be harmful to a production system, have a virtual machine running somewhere that you can torture and restore should something go wrong. For some reason, people generally frown on having to repair or reinstall production systems because someone practiced a new command that went awry. Plus, it's cool to show up one day armed with new sysadmin skills to impress (school) your coworkers. Remember to say, "Watch this," to be sure they're paying attention before you hit the Enter key so it's more dramatic and awe-inspiring.

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How App Stores Are Addressing Fragmentation in the Linux Ecosystem

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Linux

According to DistroWatch, 273 Linux distributions are currently active, with another 56 dormant and 521 discontinued. While some of these have shared underpinnings, it still makes for an extremely varied landscape for companies and developers.

It means developers must create multiple versions of their applications to be able to provide their software to all Linux users or just address a fraction of the market. Also, developers require multiple versions of build tools, which inevitably results in significant resource overhead.

Desktop application distribution is complex across all operating systems in general; in Linux, this is further compounded by such fragmentation and inter-dependencies both in the packaging and distribution of software.

For example, Fedora uses the RPM packaging format, while Debian uses the .deb format. Moreover, packages built for one version of a Linux distribution are often incompatible with other versions of the same distribution and need to be built for each version separately.

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Linux 5.4 and Linux Foundation's Reactive Foundation

Filed under
Linux
  • Google's FS-VERITY File Authentication Called For Inclusion In Linux 5.4 Kernel

    Linux kernel engineer Eric Biggers of Google has sent in a pull request adding FS-VERITY support to the Linux 5.4 but it remains to be seen if Linus Torvalds is content with pulling the code at this stage.

    FS-VERITY is the code Google has been working on for a while now in the context of Android. The focus is on providing transparent integrity/authenticity support for read-only files on an otherwise writable file-system. See this presentation to learn more on this file-based authenticity protection.

  • Linux 5.4 Brings Working Temperature Reporting For AMD Ryzen 3000 Series CPUs

    Due to a combination of poor timing and an oversight at AMD, the CPU temperature reporting under Linux for the Ryzen 3000 series processors isn't in order until this new Linux 5.4 cycle. Back at the Ryzen 3000 series launch event I was told everything was "all good" from the Linux support perspective for thermal monitoring, after having been closely following the situation for past Zen CPUs and ended up myself adding the Linux CPU temperature monitoring support for Threadripper 2 among other hudles in the past. That all-good though just ended up meaning that there is no Tcontrol offset needed for these new CPUs, which is great news no longer needing the temperature offset by an arbitrary amount. But the oversight was the Family 17h Model 70h ID was never added to the AMD k10temp driver. As a result, temperature monitoring wasn't actually working and took an extra kernel cycle before this trivial addition landed.

  • All about Reactive Foundation,The Linux Foundation's new baby

    The Linux Foundation has announced the launch of the Reactive Foundation, a community of leaders established to accelerate technologies for building the next generation of networked applications. The foundation is made up of Alibaba, Lightbend, Netifi and Pivotal as initial members and includes the successful open source RSocket specification, along with programming language implementations.

    The aim of reactive programming is to build applications that maintain a consistent user experience regardless of traffic on the network, infrastructure performance and different end-user devices (computers, tablets, smartphones). Reactive programming uses a message-driven approach to achieve the resiliency, scalability, and responsiveness that is required for today's networked cloud-native applications, independent of their underlying infrastructure. The Reactive Foundation establishes a formal open governance model and neutral ecosystem for supporting open source reactive programming projects.

    [...]

    The aim of reactive programming is to build applications that maintain a consistent user experience regardless of traffic on the network, infrastructure performance and different end-user devices (computers, tablets, smartphones). Reactive programming uses a message-driven approach to achieve the resiliency, scalability, and responsiveness that is required for today's networked cloud-native applications, independent of their underlying infrastructure. The Reactive Foundation establishes a formal open governance model and neutral ecosystem for supporting open source reactive programming projects.
    "From the beginning of our work on RSocket during my time at Netflix, our intent was to have an open system that encouraged broad adoption, which is essential for networking technology. We're thrilled to be hosted at the Linux Foundation with commitment from leaders and disruptors in the industry, and are excited to make progress enabling reactive programming," said Ryland Degnan, Co-Founder, and CTO at Netifi and Foundation community chair.

GNU Linux-libre 5.3-gnu

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNU Linux-libre 5.3-gnu sources and tarballs are now available at
<http://www.fsfla.org/selibre/linux-libre/download/releases/5.3-gnu/>.
It didn't require any deblobbing changes since -rc7-gnu, the first
published rc-gnu.  Freesh binaries are already available!, thanks to
Jason Self; others are on the way.


Besides recognizing new false positives (sequences that our blob hunter
would report as suspicious, but that are neither blobs nor requests for
blobs), updating the deblobbing scripts for 5.3 required adjusting
cleaned up drivers for updated blob names, recognizing one new Free
piece of firmware with binary and corresponding sources embedded in the
kernel sources, and disabling blob loading introduced in a few drivers:
QCOM, DRM (HDCP), Allegro-DVT, and Meson-VDEC.

This last one was particularly disappointing: the firmware sources were
supposed to be available from LibreELEC, and though the link to the
alleged sources there is broken, I managed to find the "source" repo
containing them, only to find out the "source" was just a binary blob
encoded in C as an array of char, just like Linux used to do back when I
got involved with Linux-libre.  Oh well...  Request disabled...

If anyone can find Freely-licensed actual source code for that, or for
any other file whose loading we disable, please let us know, so that we
can refrain from disabling its loading.


For up-to-the-minute news, join us on #linux-libre of irc.gnu.org
(Freenode), or follow me (@lxoliva) on Twister <http://twister.net.co/>,
Secure Scuttlebutt, GNU social at social.libreplanet.org, Diaspora* at
pod.libreplanetbr.org or pump.io at identi.ca.  Check my web page (link
in the signature) for direct links.


Be Free! with GNU Linux-libre.

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Also: GNU Linux-Libre 5.3 Kernel Arrives for Those Seeking 100% Freedom for Their PCs

GNU Linux-libre 5.3 Continues Deblobbing & Dealing With Firmware Trickery

New WireGuard Snapshot Offers Better Compatibility With Distributions/Kernels

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software
Security

WireGuard sadly isn't slated for the now-open Linux 5.4 merge window, but lead developer Jason Donenfeld has put out a new development snapshot of this open-source secure VPN tunnel.

Coming barely two weeks since the previous WireGuard snapshot, this newest development release isn't too heavy on the changes but the focus is on better portability/compatibility.

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PulseAudio 13 Released with Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio Support, More

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Released three months after the PulseAudio 12 series, PulseAudio 13 is here with support for Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio, support for the SteelSeries Arctis 5 USB headset, improved initial card profile selection for ALSA cards, as well as S/PDIF improvements for CMEDIA USB2.0 High-Speed True HD Audio.

The PulseAudio 13 series also adds several new module arguments, including "max_latency_msec" for module-loopback, "stream_name" for module-rtp-send, and "avoid_resampling" for module-udev-detect and module-alsa-card, and no longer uses persistent Bluetooth card profile choices by default, recommending users to use A2DP by default.

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GNOME Firmware App Launches Officially to Make Updating Firmware Easier on Linux

Filed under
Linux
GNOME

Promising to make firmware updates easier to deploy, GNOME Firmware is a graphical application for power users that lets them check for new firmware for their devices, update or downgrade current firmware, as well as to install new firmware. GNOME Firmware is designed as an optional utility for GNOME users, as well as users of other desktop environments.

"GNOME Firmware is designed to be a not-installed-by-default power-user tool to investigate, upgrade, downgrade and re install firmware," said Richard Hughes in a blog post. "GNOME Software will continue to be used for updates as before. Vendor helpdesks can ask users to install GNOME Firmware rather than getting them to look at command line output."

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Chuwi AeroBook review: Testing 5 Linux distributions

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Chuwi is likely not a brand familiar to many, though the Chinese firm has established its abilities in producing budget-focused notebooks and tablets—essentially, attempting to provide a full Windows experience at a price point of an average Chromebook. Chuwi's upmarket Chuwi Aerobook could be the right price for an Ultrabook form factor at a $500 price point.

Support for Linux on fundamentally consumer hardware has improved considerably over the last decade, largely preventing the need to perform extensive manual configuration. In 2019, minor compatibility issues—tiny papercut-like problems that are harder to actually solve—can pop up for specific hardware configurations. Depending on the return policies of your preferred marketplace, it might be impossible or cost-prohibitive to return a product like this if it doesn't work with Linux.

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Can a Raspberry Pi 4 really replace your PC?

Filed under
Linux

I have written several times already about the recently-released Raspberry Pi 4 Model B (see my first impressions, how-to setup, my hands-on experience, and my thoughts two months in). Now I'm going to look at one of the practical aspects that I think a lot of people have been wondering about - is it (finally) good enough to use as an every-day desktop system?

We've been through this several times before, when the original Raspberry Pi, the Pi 2 and the Pi 3 came out - and each time the answer was "only if you have enough patience". Although the amount of patience required decreased each time, it was still too slow on many everyday tasks, or too limited in configuration (primarily memory) for most people to be satisfied using it. So maybe this time it will make the grade?

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Stable kernels 5.2.15, 4.19.73, 4.14.144, 4.9.193, and 4.4.193

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.2.15

    I'm announcing the release of the 5.2.15 kernel.

    All users of the 5.2 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 5.2.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.2.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

  • Linux 4.19.73
  • Linux 4.14.144
  • Linux 4.9.193
  • Linux 4.4.193
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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

When Diverse Network ASICs Meet A Unifying Operating System

And it has also been a decade since switch upstart Arista Networks launched its Extensible Operating System, or EOS, which is derived from Linux. [...] The cross-platform nature of ArcOS, coupled with its ability to run in any function on the network, could turn out to be the key differentiator. A lot of these other NOSes were point solutions that could only be deployed in certain parts of the network, and that just creates animosity with the incumbent vendors that dominate the rest of the networking stack. Given the mission-critical nature of networking in the modern datacenter, it costs a great deal to qualify a new network operating system, and it can take a lot of time. If ArcOS can run across more platforms, qualify faster, and do more jobs in the network, then, says Garg, it has a good chance of shaking up switching and routing. “That totally changes the business conversation and the TCO advantages that we can bring to a customer across the entirety of their network.” Read more

Server: Kubernetes/OpenShift, OpenStack, and Red Hat's Ansible

  • 9 steps to awesome with Kubernetes/OpenShift presented by Burr Sutter

    Burr Sutter gave a terrific talk in India in July, where he laid out the terms, systems and processes needed to setup Kubernetes for developers. This is an introductory presentation, which may be useful for your larger community of Kubernetes users once you’ve already setup User Provisioned Infrastructure (UPI) in Red Hat OpenShift for them, though it does go into the deeper details of actually running the a cluster. To follow along, Burr created an accompanying GitHub repository, so you too can learn how to setup an awesome Kubernetes cluster in just 9 steps.

  • Weaveworks Named a Top Kubernetes Contributor

    But anyone who knows the history of Weaveworks might not be too surprised by this. Weaveworks has been a major champion of Kubernetes since the very beginning. It might not be too much of a coincidence that Weaveworks was incorporated only a few weeks after Kubernetes was open sourced, five years ago. In addition to this, the very first elected chair of the CNCF’s Technical Oversight Committee, responsible for technical leadership to the Cloud Native Foundation was also headed up by our CEO, Alexis Richardson(@monadic) (soon to be replaced by the awesome Liz Rice (@lizrice) of Aqua Security).

  • Improving trust in the cloud with OpenStack and AMD SEV

    This post contains an exciting announcement, but first I need to provide some context! Ever heard that joke “the cloud is just someone else’s computer”? Of course it’s a gross over-simplification, but there’s more than a grain of truth in it. And that raises the question: if your applications are running in someone else’s data-centre, how can you trust that they’re not being snooped upon, or worse, invasively tampered with?

  • Red Hat OpenStack Platform 15 Enhances Infrastructure Security and Cloud-Native Integration Across the Open Hybrid Cloud

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the general availability of Red Hat OpenStack Platform 15, the latest version of its highly scalable and agile cloud Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) solution. Based on the OpenStack community’s "Stein" release, Red Hat OpenStack Platform 15 adds performance and cloud security enhancements and expands the platform’s ecosystem of supported hardware, helping IT organizations to more quickly and more securely support demanding production workloads. Given the role of Linux as the foundation for hybrid cloud, customers can also benefit from a more secure, flexible and intelligent Linux operating system underpinning their private cloud deployments with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.

  • Red Hat Ansible Automation Accelerates Past Major Adoption Milestone, Now Manages More Than Four Million Customer Systems Worldwide

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that more than four million customer systems worldwide are now automated by Red Hat Ansible Automation. Customers, including Energy Market Company, Microsoft, Reserve Bank of New Zealand and Surescripts all use Red Hat Ansible Automation to automate and orchestrate their IT operations, helping to expand automation across IT stacks. According to a blog post by Chris Gardner with Forrester Research, who was the author of The Forrester Wave™: Infrastructure Automation Platforms, Q3 2019, "Infrastructure automation isn’t just on-premises or the cloud. It’s at the edge and everywhere in between."1 Since its launch in 2013, Red Hat Ansible Automation has provided a single tool to help organizations automate across IT operations and development, including infrastructure, networks, cloud, security and beyond.

Top 15+ Best Script Writing Software for Linux in 2019

Script writing software is designed to play a vital role for writers from different writing sectors. As a newbie, it may not be simple to use. But, after a certain period, it comes handy for creating scripts for films, novels, and television programs. Linux has to offer a bunch of tools for script writing for both beginners and professionals. There is a wide range of applications that are open source and free. Moreover, if you want to get some extra bit of advanced features, you may need to spend some bucks. Read more