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First Arch Linux Snapshot Powered by Linux Kernel 5.7 Is Here

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Linux

In the first day of every month, we see a new Arch Linux ISO snapshot being released, including the most recent package versions and, occasionally, brand-new GNU/Linux technologies, such as the bump to a newer Linux kernel branch.

Well, Arch Linux 2020.07.01 has been released today as July 2020’s ISO snapshot, and it’s the first to ship with the latest Linux 5.7 kernel series. While not the latest, Linux 5.7.6 is included in the Arch Linux 2020.07.01 image as the default kernel.

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Raspberry Pi 4: Chronicling the Desktop Experience – Manage your Personal Collections – Week 36

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Linux

This is a weekly blog about the Raspberry Pi 4 (“RPI4”), the latest product in the popular Raspberry Pi range of computers.

If you’re like me, you’ll have a few collections. Books, movies, coins, whatever takes your interest. Keeping track of that collection can be time-consuming, but it’s important to any serious collector. I was therefore keen to test a few open source collection managers on the RPI4.

I’ve tested Tellico, GCStar, and Alexandria (the latter not to be confused with Alexandra, a separate project).

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Audiocasts/Shows: Raspberry Pi Cluster, mintCast and LINUX Unplugged

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GNU
Linux
  • Raspberry Pi Cluster Episode 5 - Benchmarking the Turing Pi

    In this post, I'm going to talk about the Turing Pi's performance. I'll compare it to a more traditional Raspberry Pi cluster, my Pi Dramble, and talk about important considerations for your cluster, like what kind of storage you should use, or whether you should run a 32-bit or 64-bit Pi operating system.

    As with all the other work I've done on this cluster, I've been documenting it all in my open source Turing Pi Cluster project on GitHub.

  • mintCast 338 – Two Oh Snap

    First up, in our Wanderings, Owen refurbishes, Tony prints new stuff, Moss has a panic attack, Joe attends a LUG, Bo games, and Leo upgrades to 20.

  • The Hard Work of Hardware | LINUX Unplugged 360

    We're joined by two guests who share their insights into building modern Linux hardware products.

    Plus we try out Mint 20, cover some big Gnome fixes, and a very handy open source noise suppression pick!

    Special Guests: Alfred Neumayer, Brent Gervais, Drew DeVore, and Jeremy Soller.

Linux-Friendly Devices

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

Compact embedded system showcases 5-core HiSilicon HI3559A

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Linux

Aaeon’s compact “Boxer-8410AI” embedded AI edge system runs Linux on a penta-core, Cortex-A73 and -A53 based HiSilicon HI3559A with an AI-enabled VPU.

Aaeon has posted a product page for its first Boxer computer to support the 5-core, Arm-based HiSilicon HI3559A SoC. Although the HI3559A was announced back in 2017 as a camera SoC that supports up to [email protected] input, the Boxer-8410AI has no MIPI-CSI or other camera interfaces, and the dual GbE ports lack PoE for powering IP cameras.

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Review: System76’s Lemur Pro

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Linux
Reviews

If you’re a Linux user on the hunt for a new laptop, there’s quite a bit of preparation and research you must do on top of the regular research buying such an expensive piece of equipment already entails. Reading forum posts from other Linux users with the laptop you’re interested in, hunting for detailed specifications to make sure that specific chip version or that exact piece of exotic hardware is fully supported, checking to see if your favourite distribution has adequate support for it, and so on.

There is, however, another way. While vastly outnumbered, there are laptops sold with Linux preinstalled. Even some of the big manufacturers, such as Dell, sell laptops with Linux preinstalled, but often only on older models that have been out for a while, or while not fully supporting all hardware (the fingerprint reader and infrared camera on my XPS 13 were not supported by Linux, for instance). For the likes of Dell, Linux in the consumer space is an afterthought, a minor diversion, and it shows.

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Manjaro Linux 32-bit is dead

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Linux

We have had 64-bit processors in the mainstream for many years now, but for some reason, developers have continued to maintain 32-bit versions of operating systems. This includes Microsoft, who still supports 32-bit Windows 10 in 2020 (although the company plans to wind that down). Thankfully, many Linux distributions such as Fedora, Tails, and Linux Mint have killed off their 32-bit versions, choosing to instead focus on 64-bit.

And now, another major Linux distribution follows suit. You see, as of today, Manjaro Linux 32-bit is dead. This is a very wise move, as 32-bit computers are obsolete and maintaining a 32-bit variant of an OS is a waste of resources. Anyone that disagrees is very wrong.

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Sans Investigative Forensics Toolkit (SIFT)

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GNU
Linux

SIFT is a computer forensics distribution created by the SANS Forensics team for performing digital forensics. This distro includes most tools required for digital forensics analysis and incident response examinations. SIFT is open-source and publicly available for free on the internet. In today’s digital world, where crimes are committed every day using digital technology, attackers are becoming more and more stealthy and sophisticated. This can cause companies to lose important data, with millions of users exposed. Protecting your organization from these attacks requires strong forensic techniques and knowledge in your defense strategy. SIFT provides forensic tools for file systems, memory and network investigations to perform in-depth forensic investigations.
In 2007, SIFT was available for download and was hard coded, so whenever an update arrived, users had to download the newer version. With further innovation in 2014, SIFT became available as a robust package on Ubuntu, and can now be downloaded as a workstation. Later, in 2017, a version of SIFT came to market allowing greater functionality and providing users the ability to leverage data from other sources. This newer version contains more than 200 tools from third parties, and contains a package manager requiring users to type only one command to install a package. This version is more stable, more efficient, and provides better functionality in terms of memory analysis. SIFT is scriptable, meaning that users can combine certain commands to make it work according to their needs.

SIFT can run on any system running on Ubuntu or Windows OS. SIFT supports various evidence formats, including AFF, E01, and raw format (DD). Memory forensics images are also compatible with SIFT. For file systems, SIFT supports ext2, ext3 for linux, HFS for Mac and FAT, V-FAT, MS-DOS, and NTFS for Windows.

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Relive the NeXTSTEP Operating System with Window Maker

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GNU
Linux

Released in September 1989, NeXTSTEP was the pioneering operating system behind Steve Jobs’ NeXT computer line, including the NeXTcube – one of the most desirable computers of all time. Although relatively unknown today, NeXTSTEP inspired many modern interfaces, gave birth to the Web with the first browser, and was even used by id Software to develop Doom and Quake.

You may think NeXTSTEP is now lost to time, but what if you could use essentially the same interface on a modern Linux PC with no need for emulation? With Window Maker you can.

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7 Best Linux Distros for Security and Privacy in 2020

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GNU
Linux
Security

Privacy and security are pressing concerns for all of us these days – not a day goes by that we aren’t bombarded with security news headlines about hacks, breaches and the increased storing and monitoring of sensitive personal information by governments and corporations.

Luckily, when it comes to security, Linux users are faring better than their Windows- or Mac- using counterparts. Linux offers inherent security advantages over proprietary operating systems due to the transparency of its open-source code and the constant, thorough review that this code undergoes by a vibrant global community. While transparent source code may at first seem like a privacy nightmare, it is actually the complete opposite. As a result of the “many eyes” that Linux has on its code at all times, security vulnerabilities are identified and remedied very rapidly. In contrast, with proprietary OSes like Windows or MacOS, source code is hidden from outsiders - in other words, users are dependent upon Microsoft or Apple to find, fix and disclose vulnerabilities. Linux is also a relatively unpopular target for malicious hackers due to its small user base.

While all Linux “distros” - or distributed versions of Linux software - are secure by design, certain distros go above and beyond when it comes to protecting users’ privacy and security. We’ve put together a list of our favorite exceptionally-secure Linux distros and spoken with some of their lead developers to find out first-hand what makes these distros so great. This article aims to help you evaluate your options and select the distro that best meets your individual needs.

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Also: Security updates for Tuesday

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XFS / EXT4 / Btrfs / F2FS / NILFS2 Performance On Linux 5.8

Given the reignited discussions this week over Btrfs file-system performance stemming from a proposal to switch Fedora on the desktop to using Btrfs, here are some fresh benchmarks of not only Btrfs but alongside XFS, EXT4, F2FS, and for kicks NILFS2 was also tossed into the mix for these mainline file-system tests off the in-development Linux 5.8 kernel. With the yet-to-be-approved proposal specifically to use Btrfs for desktop installations, for this testing a single NVMe solid-state drive was used for testing in jiving with conventional desktop use-cases rather than any elaborate RAID setups, etc. Each of the tested file-systems were carried out with the default mount options in an out-of-the-box manner. Read more