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Stable kernels 5.2.16, 4.19.74, and 4.14.145

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Linux
  • Linux 5.2.16

    I'm announcing the release of the 5.2.16 kernel.

    All users of the 5.2 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 5.2.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.2.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

  • Linux 4.19.74
  • Linux 4.14.145

Linux Container Technology Explained (Contributed)

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Linux

State and local governments’ IT departments increasingly rely on DevOps practices and agile development methodologies to improve service delivery and to help maintain a culture of constant collaboration, iteration, and flexibility among all stakeholders and teams.

However, when an IT department adopts agile and DevOps practices and methodologies, traditional IT problems still need to be solved. One long-standing problem is “environmental drift,” when the code and configurations for applications and their underlying infrastructure can vary between different environments. State and local IT teams often lack the tools necessary to mitigate the effects of environmental drift, which can hamper collaboration and agility efforts.

Read more

Ubuntu-maker Canonical shares top 5 snaps per Linux distribution

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Linux
Ubuntu

All Linux users are the same, right? Oh, hell no! Linux users are a diverse bunch, with differing opinions, tastes, and personalities. In fact, that is probably a contributing factor to the fragmentation of the Linux community. Linux users have lots of options between distributions, desktop environments, and more -- they are not stuck in a box like Windows 10 users.

To highlight how different Linux users can be, Canonical has released some data about the installation of snaps, categorized by distro. It chose six of the most popular Linux-based operating systems for its analysis -- Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, CentOS, Arch Linux, and Manjaro. It then shared the top five most popular snaps for each distribution.

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Linux-powered NVR can stream and analyze 12 HD cam feeds without a cloud connection

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Linux

A new “Camect” camera hub and 1TB NVR that can aggregate up to 12 HD streams has funded on Indiegogo. The $279 device runs Linux on an Apollo Lake SoC and provides AI algorithms to analyze video without a cloud service.

A Mountain View-based startup called Camect has successfully launched an Apollo Lake-based, AI-enabled camera hub and network video recorder for analyzing surveillance feeds. After more than quintupling its $50K Indiegogo goal, the Camect is available for another 15 days in $279 early bird packages, down from the eventual $399 when it ships in January.

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Audiocasts/Shows/Video: Ubuntu Podcast, Choose Linux, BSD Now and ArcoLinux 19.09 Run Through

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E24 – Gran Turismo

    This week we’ve been cataloging hardware (mostly crusty Thinkpads). We interview Kyle Fazzari, serior robotics engineer at Canonical, bring you some command line love and go over all your feedback.

    It’s Season 12 Episode 24 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Kyle Fazzari are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Introducing New People to Linux | Choose Linux 18

    There’s lots to consider when setting someone up with Linux for the first time. User needs and expectations, distro choice, hardware, and so much more.

    We discuss our experiences, and ask some fundamental questions.

  • git commit FreeBSD | BSD Now 316

    NetBSD LLVM sanitizers and GDB regression test suite, Ada—The Language of Cost Savings, Homura - a Windows Games Launcher for FreeBSD, FreeBSD core team appoints a WG to explore transition to Git, OpenBSD 6.6 Beta tagged, Project Trident 12-U5 update now available, and more.

  • ArcoLinux 19.09 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at ArcoLinux 19.09 with XFCE 4.14.

Linux on the mainframe: Then and now

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Linux

Last week, I introduced you to the origins of the mainframe's origins from a community perspective. Let's continue our journey, picking up at the end of 1999, which is when IBM got onboard with Linux on the mainframe (IBM Z).

These patches weren't part of the mainline Linux kernel yet, but they did get Linux running on z/VM (Virtual Machine for IBM Z), for anyone who was interested. Several efforts followed, including the first Linux distro—put together out of Marist College in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., and Think Blue Linux by Millenux in Germany. The first real commercial distribution came from SUSE on October 31, 2000; this is notable in SUSE history because the first edition of what is now known as SUSE Enterprise Linux (SLES) is that S/390 port. Drawing again from Wikipedia, the SUSE Enterprise Linux page explains:

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LWN Articles About Linux (Kernel): Linux Plumbers Conference, Staging, Linux Conference North America, Stable Statistics

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Linux
  • Topics from the Open Printing microconference

    On day two of the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference, two of the principals behind the Open Printing project led the very first Open Printing microconference. Project leader Till Kamppeter and program manager Aveek Basu described the current state of printing on Linux and some of the plans for the future, including supporting scanning for multi-function devices. The picture they painted was rosy, at least for printing, which may not quite match the experience of many Linux users. As with many projects, though, Open Printing is starved for contributors—something that was reflected in the sparse attendance at the microconference.

    Basu began by pointing out that some attendees had likely printed their boarding passes from Linux, which highlights the importance of printing for Linux. People use it for bank documents, transport tickets, and more. He has been at Lexmark for 11 years, working on printing for Linux, macOS, and other Unix-based systems. Kamppeter said that he has been the Open Printing leader since 2001. The idea of the project is to do everything possible to make printing "just work" with Linux and other operating systems; the goal is "plug and print".

  • What happens to kernel staging-tree code

    The staging tree was added to the kernel in 2008 for the 2.6.28 development cycle as a way to ease the process of getting substandard device drivers into shape and merged into the mainline. It has been followed by controversy for just about as long. The recent disagreements over the EROFS and exFAT filesystems have reignited many of the arguments over whether the staging tree is beneficial to the kernel community or not. LWN cannot answer that question, but we can look into what has transpired in the staging tree in its first eleven years to see if there are any conclusions to be drawn there.

    The core idea behind the staging tree is that it is open to code that does not live up to the normal standards for inclusion into the kernel. Once a driver is added there, it is available to anybody who is brave enough to try to make use of it, but the real purpose is to allow developers to improve the code to the point that it is ready to go into the kernel proper. It serves as an easy place for new developers to try out simple changes and, when it works well, it helps the kernel to gain hardware support that might otherwise languish out-of-tree indefinitely.

  • The USB debugging arsenal

    At the 2019 Embedded Linux Conference North America, which was held in San Diego in August, Krzysztof Opasiak gave a presentation on demystifying the ways to monitor—and even change—USB traffic on a Linux system. He started with the basics of the USB protocol and worked up into software and hardware tools to observe, modify, and fuzz the messages that get sent. Those tools are part of the arsenal that is available to those interested in looking deeply into USB.

    Opasiak works in Poland for what he called a "small Korean company" (Samsung). He noted that it is not that easy to sniff USB traffic and that the ways to do so are not well known. But "there are no dragons"; nothing bad will happen if you do so. In some ways, USB is like the internet and some of the same tools can be used for both.

  • 5.3 Kernel development cycle statistics

    It's that time of the development cycle again: work on the 5.3 kernel is winding down with an expected final release date of September 15. Read on for LWN's traditional look at where the code in 5.3 came from in this relatively busy development cycle.
    As of this writing, 14,435 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline repository for 5.3; these changes were contributed by 1,846 developers

The [EndeavourOS] September release has arrived

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The ISO contains:

Linux kernel 5.2.14
Mesa 19.1.6
Systemd 243.0
Firefox 69 (Quantum)
Arc-x-icons, a more complete and updated version than the Arc icon set used previously.
The new EndeavourOS welcome launcher on both the live environment as on the installed system. It’s a one-click menu to the wiki for the basic system commands and setting up your hardware.
Our Nvidia-installer is now installed by default which now also installs the dkms drivers.
Gtop system monitor, a nice terminal-based system load monitor that launches from the panel.

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Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Headlines, Void Linux, This Week in Linux and LINUX Unplugged

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GNU
Linux

Linux 5.4 Developments and Merges

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.4 Power Management Updates Sent In But Without AMD CPPC Changes

    The Linux 5.4 power management changes have been submitted for this next version of the Linux kernel.

    This time around the power management work isn't particularly exciting with no breakthroughs for the Intel P-State driver, no major changes to the other prominent CPUFreq drivers/governors, and no AMD CPPC support for their new processors.

  • Linux 5.4 Preps For Intel Tiger Lake, Elkhart Lake & Lightning Mountain + Killing MPX

    The Linux 5.4 x86/cpu changes are as busy as always on the Intel side.

    The Linux 5.4 x86/cpu code changes include cleaning up the Intel CPU naming conventions within definitions in the code. The changes now provide a standardized convention for dealing with Intel CPU core names and their variations within the kernel code rather than the naming convention mess that had come about over the years. This doesn't impact end-users, but cleans up the kernel code to be less confusing.

  • Microsoft exFAT File-System Mailed In For Linux 5.4 Along With Promoted EROFS & Greybus

    Greg Kroah-Hartman began volleying his Linux 5.4 kernel pull requests today of the subsystems he oversees. The most significant of this morning's pull requests are the staging area changes that include the Microsoft exFAT file-system support.

    As we've been expecting, Linux 5.4 is bringing exFAT support after last month's surprise announcement by Microsoft publishing the exFAT specification and giving it an open-source blessing for integrating the file-system support at long last into the Linux kernel.

  • Improved Fscrypt Sent In For Linux 5.4 To Offer Better Native File Encryption Handling

    In addition to submitting the FS-VERITY file authentication code for Linux 5.4, Google's Eric Biggers has sent out his big update to the fscrypt file encryption framework for this next kernel revision.

    Fscrypt as a reminder is a kernel framework providing native file encryption support to file-systems. Currently Fscrypt is used by EXT4, F2FS, and UBIFS while being used by Google for at least new Android use-cases. Fscrypt has been around for several kernel cycles now but for Linux 5.4 is seeing its first big update.

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More in Tux Machines

Debian: CUPS, LTS and Archival

  • Praise Be CUPS Driverless Printing

    Last Tuesday, I finally got to start updating $work's many desktop computers to Debian Buster. I use Puppet to manage them remotely, so major upgrades basically mean reinstalling machines from scratch and running Puppet. Over the years, the main upgrade hurdle has always been making our very large and very complicated printers work on Debian. Unsurprisingly, the blog posts I have written on that topic are very popular and get me a few 'thank you' emails per month. I'm very happy to say, thanks to CUPS Driverless Printing (CUPS 2.2.2+), all those trials and tribulations are finally over. Printing on Buster just works. Yes yes, even color booklets printed on 11x17 paper folded in 3 stapled in the middle.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, August 2019

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • Louis-Philippe Véronneau: Archiving 20 years of online content

    mailman2 is pretty great. You can get a dump of an email list pretty easily and mailman3's web frontend, the lovely hyperkitty, is well, lovely. Importing a legacy mailman2 mbox went without a hitch thanks to the awesome hyperkitty_import importer. Kudos to the Debian Mailman Team for packaging this in Debian for us. But what about cramming a Yahoo! Group mailing list in hyperkitty? I wouldn't recommend it. After way too many hours spent battling character encoding errors I just decided people that wanted to read obscure emails from 2003 would have to deal with broken accents and shit. But hey, it kinda works! Oh, and yes, archiving a Yahoo! Group with an old borken Perl script wasn't an easy task. Hell, I kept getting blacklisted by Yahoo! for scraping too much data to their liking. I ended up patching together the results of multiple runs over a few weeks to get the full mbox and attachments. By the way, if anyone knows how to tell hyperkitty to stop at a certain year (i.e. not display links for 2019 when the list stopped in 2006), please ping me.

Running The AMD "ABBA" Ryzen 3000 Boost Fix Under Linux With 140 Tests

Last week AMD's AGESA "ABBA" update began shipping with a fix to how the boost clock frequencies are handled in hopes of better achieving the rated boost frequencies for Ryzen 3000 series processors. I've been running some tests of an updated ASUS BIOS with this adjusted boost clock behavior to see how it performs under Linux with a Ryzen 9 3900X processor. The AGESA 1.0.0.3 ABBA update has an improved boost clock frequency algorithm along with changes to the idle state handling. This AGESA update should better position AMD Ryzen 3000 processors with the boost clock behavior expected by users with better hitting the maximum boost frequency and doing so more aggressively. Read more

Stable kernels 5.2.16, 4.19.74, and 4.14.145

  • Linux 5.2.16
    I'm announcing the release of the 5.2.16 kernel. All users of the 5.2 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 5.2.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.2.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...
  • Linux 4.19.74
  • Linux 4.14.145

Linux Container Technology Explained (Contributed)

State and local governments’ IT departments increasingly rely on DevOps practices and agile development methodologies to improve service delivery and to help maintain a culture of constant collaboration, iteration, and flexibility among all stakeholders and teams. However, when an IT department adopts agile and DevOps practices and methodologies, traditional IT problems still need to be solved. One long-standing problem is “environmental drift,” when the code and configurations for applications and their underlying infrastructure can vary between different environments. State and local IT teams often lack the tools necessary to mitigate the effects of environmental drift, which can hamper collaboration and agility efforts. Read more