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There's A Professional Grade Digital Cinema Camera Powered By Linux

Filed under
Linux

Digital camera startup Octopus Cinema has been designing the "OCTOPUSCAMERA" as a digital cinema camera that's professional grade yet is an open platform with removable/upgradeable parts and this camera platform itself is running Linux.

The OCTOPUSCAMERA supports up to 5K full frame recording, weighs less than 1kg, and is powered by Linux. It's a rather ambitious device and they aim to be shipping in 2020.

Read more

Also: Old Linus Torvalds is back: Linux page caching sparks 'bulls**t' outburst [Ed: Anti-Linux writers of the CBS tabloid ZDNet are mobbing Torvalds into silence again]

Linux Package Managers Compared – AppImage vs Snap vs Flatpak

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Package managers provide a way of packaging, distributing, installing, and maintaining apps in an operating system. With modern desktop, server and IoT applications of the Linux operating system and the hundreds of different distros that exist, it becomes necessary to move away from platform specific packaging methods to platform agnostic ones. This post explores 3 such tools, namely AppImage, Snap and Flatpak, that each aim to be the future of software deployment and management in Linux. At the end we summarize a few key findings.

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Raspberry Pi 4 is here!

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Linux

The latest version of the Raspberry Pi—Raspberry Pi 4—was released today, earlier than anticipated, featuring a new 1.5GHz Arm chip and VideoCore GPU with some brand new additions: dual-HDMI 4K display output; USB3 ports; Gigabit Ethernet; and multiple RAM options up to 4GB.

The Raspberry Pi 4 is a very powerful single-board computer and starts at the usual price of $35. That gets you the standard 1GB RAM, or you can pay $45 for the 2GB model or $55 for the 4GB model—premium-priced models are a first for Raspberry Pi.

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Linux 5.2-rc6

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Linux

I really was hoping that we'd continue to have an increasingly quiet
and shrinking rc series. But that was not to be.

rc6 is the biggest rc in number of commits we've had so far for this
5.2 cycle (obviously ignoring the merge window itself and rc1). And
it's not just because of trivial patches (although admittedly we have
those too), but we obviously had the TCP SACK/fragmentation/mss fixes
in there, and they in turn required some fixes too.

Happily we did pick up on the problem quickly - largely thanks to the
patches making it into distro kernels quickly and then causing
problems for the steam client of all things - but it's still something
that doesn't exactly make me get the warm and fuzzies at this point in
the release cycle.

I'm also doing this rc on a Saturday, because I am going to spend all
of tomorrow on a plane once again. So I'm traveling first for a
conference and then for some R&R on a liveaboard, so I'm going to have
spotty access to email for a few days, and then for a week I'll be
entirely incommunicado. So rc7 will be delayed.

I was thinking that I timed it all really well in what should be the
quietest period of the release cycle for me, and now I obviously hope
that last week really was a fluke.

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Linux Foundation Leftovers

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Kernel: Rants, PulseAudio 12, Valve-Related Bug and Mesa 19.1.1 RC

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • 'Bulls%^t! Complete bull$h*t!' Reset the clock on the last time woke Linus Torvalds exploded at a Linux kernel dev

    Linux kernel chieftain Linus Torvalds owes the swear jar a few quid this week, although by his standards this most recent rant of his is relatively restrained.

    Over on the kernel development mailing list, in a long and involved thread about the functionality and efficiency of operating system page caches, firebrand-turned-woke Torvalds described Aussie programmer Dave Chinner’s arguments in the debate as "bullshit," "complete bullshit," and "obviously garbage."

    To be fair to the open-source overlord, this is a far less personal attack than previous outbursts, such as the time he slammed "some security people" as "just f#cking morons," or that unforgettable straight-to-the-point detonation: "Mauro, SHUT THE F**K UP."

  • It Looks Like PulseAudio 13.0 Will Be Releasing Soon

    It's been a year since the release of PulseAudio 12 and even eleven months since the last point release but it looks like the next PulseAudio release will be out very soon.

    The next PulseAudio release has been under discussion with the sorting out of when the release will take place and any blocker bugs. As it stands now, there is just one blocker bug remaining and that is addressing a regression.

  • A One Line Kernel Patch Appears To Solve The Recent Linux + Steam Networking Regression

    As a follow-up to the issue reported on Friday regarding the latest Linux kernel releases causing problems for Valve's Steam client, a fix appears pending that with changing around one line of code does appear to address the regression.

    Linus Torvalds got involved and pointed out a brand new kernel patch that may solve the issue. That patch was quickly reaffirmed by Linux gamers as well as prominent Valve Linux developer Pierre-Loup A. Griffais.

  • Mesa 19.1.1 release candidate
    Hello list,
    
    The candidate for the Mesa 19.1.1 is now available. Currently we have:
     - 27 queued
     - 0 nominated (outstanding)
     - and 0 rejected patch
    
    
    The current queue consists mostly in fixes for different drivers (RADV, ANV,
    Nouveau, Virgl, V3D, R300g, ...)
    
    The queue also contains different fixes for different parts (Meson build, GLX,
    etc).
    
    Take a look at section "Mesa stable queue" for more information
    
    
    Testing reports/general approval
    --------------------------------
    Any testing reports (or general approval of the state of the branch) will be
    greatly appreciated.
    
    The plan is to have 19.1.1 this Tuesday (25th June), around or shortly after
    10:00 GMT.
    
    If you have any questions or suggestions - be that about the current patch queue
    or otherwise, please go ahead.
    
    
    Trivial merge conflicts
    -----------------------
    commit 25a34df61439b25645d03510d6354cb1f5e8a185
    Author: Kenneth Graunke 
    
        iris: Fix iris_flush_and_dirty_history to actually dirty history.
    
        (cherry picked from commit 64fb20ed326fa0e524582225faaa4bb28f6e4349)
    
    
    Cheers,
        J.A.
    
  • Mesa 19.1.1 Is Coming Next Week With A Variety Of Fixes

    Debuting two weeks ago was the Mesa 19.1 quarterly feature update while due out early next week is the first bug-fix point release.

    Mesa 19.1 is a huge update over 19.0 and earlier. Mesa 19.1 brought multiple new Gallium3D drivers as well as a new Vulkan driver (TURNIP), performance optimizations, new Vulkan extensions, mature Icelake support, and a variety of other features as listed in the aforelinked article.

Enso OS, A Desktop Mix between Xubuntu and elementary OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Enso OS is a relatively new GNU/Linux distro based on Ubuntu with XFCE desktop coupled with Gala Window Manager. Looking at Enso is like looking at a mix between Xubuntu and elementary OS. It features a Super key start menu called Panther and a global menu on its top panel, making the interface very interesting to try. This overview briefly highlights the user interface for you.

Read more

Stable kernels 5.1.13, 5.1.14, 4.19.54, 4.19.55, 4.14.129, 4.9.183, and 4.4.183

Filed under
Linux

Linux Hardware: Intel and Qualcomm

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Intel Drops 2 Exciting Clues About The Future Of Clear Linux OS For 'Normal' Desktop Users [Ed: Intel is still trying, more desperately over time, to generate interest in its flailing GNU/Linux distro while putting back doors in every chip and doing other profoundly dubious things]

    I'm not a developer, a server administrator or anyone with advanced programming skills. I'm just a normal desktop Linux user who appreciates speed, stability, great aesthetics and ease of use. As such I've been keeping a close eye on Intel's Clear Linux, and have been insisting it's worth paying attention to. Intel's recent community efforts around Clear Linux -- and even certain touches they've implemented to the installer -- have given me the strong belief that the company is looking to serve people just like me in the near future. So I asked the burning question directly, and Intel just answered it.

  • Touch panel PCs offer a choice of 64 models mixing different sizes and Intel chips

    Taicenn’s Linux-friendly, IP65 protected “TPC-DCM” industrial panel PCs let you choose between 6th or 7th Gen U-series Core, Apollo Lake, or Bay Trail CPUs with 2x GbE, SATA, optional wireless, and capacitive touchscreens between 15 and 24 inches.

    Taicenn, which last year introduced an Intel Bay Trail based, in-vehicle TPC-DCXXXC1E panel PC has now returned with an industrial series of TPC-DCM panel PCs. You can choose between 64 configurations, with 8x Intel processor choices and 8x screen sizes: 15.0, 2x 15.6, 17.0, 18.5, 19.0, 21.5 and 24.0-inch models ranging from 1024 x 768 to 1920 x 1080 pixels.

  • Three Linux router boards showcase Qualcomm IPQ4019

    Three router SBCs that run Linux on Qualcomm’s quad -A7 IPQ4019 have reached market: The Dakota DR4019 with 2x GbE, optional SFP and Wave2 WiFi, MikroTik’s RB450Gx4 with 5x GbE and PoE, and a $200 Kefu DB11 dev kit.

AMD Navi and Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware
  • More AMD Navi GPUs show up in a Linux driver

    A since-deleted commit for a Linux driver update hints at 4 new AMD Navi GPUs.

  • Libdrm Picks Up Support For AMD Navi

    As another one of the prerequisites for landing the AMD Radeon RX 5000 series "Navi" support in Mesa, the libdrm bits have just been merged.

    Libdrm is the Mesa DRM library that is needed for sitting between the Linux kernel Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) interfaces and the user-space components (depending upon the driver, as is required by like RadeonSI). Libdrm also ends up being used by the DDX drivers like xf86-video-amdgpu and other components as well depending upon the driver. As of a short time ago, the Navi bits landed in libdrm Git.

    The Navi support here isn't all that exciting and mostly boilerplate code for a new generation for a new family ID, a new member for a tile steering override for GFX10, GDDR6 as a new video memory type, and the largest addition is simply the new tests for VCN 2.0 video decode support.

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More in Tux Machines

There's A Professional Grade Digital Cinema Camera Powered By Linux

Digital camera startup Octopus Cinema has been designing the "OCTOPUSCAMERA" as a digital cinema camera that's professional grade yet is an open platform with removable/upgradeable parts and this camera platform itself is running Linux. The OCTOPUSCAMERA supports up to 5K full frame recording, weighs less than 1kg, and is powered by Linux. It's a rather ambitious device and they aim to be shipping in 2020. Read more Also: Old Linus Torvalds is back: Linux page caching sparks 'bulls**t' outburst [Ed: Anti-Linux writers of the CBS tabloid ZDNet are mobbing Torvalds into silence again]

Android Leftovers

One Mix Yoga 3 mini laptop demostrated running Ubuntu

If you are in interested in seeing how the Ubuntu Linux operating system runs on the new One Mix Yoga 3 mini laptop. You are sure to be interested in the new video created by Brad Linder over at Liliputing. “ I posted some notes about what happened when I took Ubuntu 19.04 for a spin on the One Mix 3 Yoga in my first-look article, but plenty of folks who watched my first look video on YouTube asked for a video… so I made one of those too.” The creators of the One Mix Yoga 3 have made it fairly easy to boot an alternative operating system simply by plugging in a bootable flash drive or USB storage device. As the mini laptop is powering up simply hit the delete key and you will be presented by the BIOS/UEFI menu. Simply change the boot priority order so that the computer will boot from a USB device and you are in business. Read more

Security: Curl, Fedora, Windows and More

  • Daniel Stenberg: openssl engine code injection in curl

    This flaw is known as CVE-2019-5443. If you downloaded and installed a curl executable for Windows from the curl project before June 21st 2019, go get an updated one. Now.

  • Fedora's GRUB2 EFI Build To Offer Greater Security Options

    In addition to disabling root password-based SSH log-ins by default, another change being made to Fedora 31 in the name of greater security is adding some additional GRUB2 boot-loader modules to be built-in for their EFI boot-loader. GRUB2 security modules for verification, Cryptodisk, and LUKS will now be part of the default GRUB2 EFI build. They are being built-in now since those using the likes of UEFI SecureBoot aren't able to dynamically load these modules due to restrictions in place under SecureBoot. So until now using SecureBoot hasn't allowed users to enjoy encryption of the boot partition and the "verify" module with ensuring better integrity of the early boot-loader code.

  • Fedora 31 Will Finally Disable OpenSSH Root Password-Based Logins By Default

    Fedora 31 will harden up its default configuration by finally disabling password-based OpenSSH root log-ins, matching the upstream default of the past four years and behavior generally enforced by other Linux distributions. The default OpenSSH daemon configuration file will now respect upstream's default of prohibiting passwords for root log-ins. Those wishing to restore the old behavior of allowing root log-ins with a password can adjust their SSHD configuration file with the PermitRootLogin option, but users are encouraged to instead use a public-key for root log-ins that is more secure and will be permitted still by default.

  • Warning Issued For Millions Of Microsoft Windows 10 Users

    Picked up by Gizmodo, acclaimed Californian security company SafeBreach has revealed that software pre-installed on PCs has left “millions” of users exposed to hackers. Moreover, that estimate is conservative with the number realistically set to be hundreds of millions. The flaw lies in PC-Doctor Toolbox, systems analysis software which is rebadged and pre-installed on PCs made by some of the world’s biggest computer retailers, including Dell, its Alienware gaming brand, Staples and Corsair. Dell alone shipped almost 60M PCs last year and the company states PC-Doctor Toolbox (which it rebrands as part of ‘SupportAssist’) was pre-installed on “most” of them. What SafeBreach has discovered is a high-severity flaw which allows attackers to swap-out harmless DLL files loaded during Toolbox diagnostic scans with DLLs containing a malicious payload. The injection of this code impacts both Windows 10 business and home PCs and enables hackers to gain complete control of your computer. What makes it so dangerous is PC-makers give Toolbox high-permission level access to all your computer’s hardware and software so it can be monitored. The software can even give itself new, higher permission levels as it deems necessary. So once malicious code is injected via Toolbox, it can do just about anything to your PC.

  • Update Your Dell Laptop Now to Fix a Critical Security Flaw in Pre-Installed Software

    SafeBreach Labs said it targeted SupportAssist, software pre-installed on most Dell PCs designed to check the health of the system’s hardware, based on the assumption that “such a critical service would have high permission level access to the PC hardware as well as the capability to induce privilege escalation.” What the researchers found is that the application loads DLL files from a folder accessible to users, meaning the files can be replaced and used to load and execute a malicious payload. There are concerns the flaw may affect non-Dell PCs, as well. The affected module within SupportAssist is a version of PC-Doctor Toolbox found in a number of other applications, including: Corsair ONE Diagnostics, Corsair Diagnostics, Staples EasyTech Diagnostics, Tobii I-Series Diagnostic Tool, and Tobii Dynavox Diagnostic Tool. The most effective way to prevent DLL hijacking is to quickly apply patches from the vendor. To fix this bug, either allow automatic updates to do its job, or download the latest version of Dell SupportAssist for Business PCs (x86 or x64) or Home PCs (here). You can read a full version of the SafeBreach Labs report here.

  • TCP SACK PANIC Kernel Vulnerabilities Reported by Netflix Researchers

    On June 17th, Researchers at Netflix have identified several TCP networking vulnerabilities in FreeBSD and Linux kernels.

  • DNS Security - Getting it Right

    This paper addresses the privacy implications of two new Domain Name System (DNS) encryption protocols: DNS-over-TLS (DoT) and DNS-over-HTTPS (DoH). Each of these protocols provides a means to secure the transfer of data during Internet domain name lookup, and they prevent monitoring and abuse of user data in this process. DoT and DoH provide valuable new protection for users online. They add protection to one of the last remaining unencrypted ‘core’ technologies of the modern Internet, strengthen resistance to censorship and can be coupled with additional protections to provide full user anonymity. Whilst DoT and DoH appear to be a win for Internet users, however, they raise issues for network operators concerned with Internet security and operational efficiency. DoH in particular makes it extremely difficult for network operators to implement domain-specific filters or blocks, which may have a negative impact on UK government strategies for the Internet which rely on these. We hope that a shift to encrypted DNS will lead to decreased reliance on network-level filtering for censorship.