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Linux Devices/Embedded

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Linux

Kernel Space/Linux

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Linux

Raspberry Pi analog input board has weather station option

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Linux

RasPi.TV has Kickstartered a $12 “RasPiO Analog Zero” Raspberry Pi add-on board the size of an Raspberry Pi Zero. It offers eight 10-bit analog inputs.

The RasPiO Analog Zero has surpassed its Kickstarter goals, and is available through May 31 starting at 8 Pounds ($12). Designed for reading up to eight analog sensors simultaneously on a Raspberry Pi, the add-on board is matched to the size of the 65 x 30mm Raspberry Pi Zero. However, it plugs into any Pi with a 40-pin expansion connector, and can work with older 26-pin Pi models with the help of an adapter.

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Everything you need to know about Linux Commands

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Linux

It won't be long after starting to use Linux that you ask a question and the answer begins with, "Open a terminal and..." At this point, you may be thrown into an alien environment with typed Linux commands instead of cheery-looking icons. But the terminal is not alien, it's just different.

You are used to a GUI now, but you had to learn that, and the same applies to the command line. This raises an obvious question: "I already know how to use a windowed desktop, why must I learn something different?"

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Google to bring official Android support to the Raspberry Pi 3

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Android
Linux
Google

The Raspberry Pi 3 is not hurting for operating system choices. The tiny ARM computer is supported by several Linux distributions and even has a version of Windows 10 IoT core available. Now, it looks like the Pi is about to get official support for one of the most popular operating systems out there: Android. In Google's Android Open Source Project (AOSP) repository, a new device tree recently popped up for the Raspberry Pi 3.

Raspberry Pis, if you're not aware, are cheap, credit card-sized, single board ARM computers with a focus on education and open source software. Hardware hackers and DIYers love the Pi due to its open nature, small size, and plethora of ports and software.

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CentOS Linux 6.8 Officially Released, Based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.8

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OS
Linux

CentOS developer and maintainer Johnny Hughes today, May 25, 2016, had the great pleasure of announcing the release and immediate availability for download of the CentOS Linux 6.8 operating system.

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What containers and unikernels can learn from Arduino and Raspberry Pi

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Linux
Server

There is a lot of interesting buzz around specialized container hosts, rump kernels, and unikernels because they hold the potential to revolutionize certain workloads (embedded, cloud, etc.). Keep your eye on this exciting, fast moving space, but cautiously.

Currently, unikernels seem quite similar to building printed circuits. They require a lot of upfront investment to utilize and are very specialized, providing benefits for certain workloads. In the meantime containers are quite interesting even for conventional workloads and don't require as much investment. Typically an operations team should be able to port an application to containers, whereas it takes real re-engineering to port an application to unikernels and the industry is still not quite sure what workloads can be ported to unikernels.

Here's to an exciting future of containers, rump kernels, and unikernels!

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Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Is Ubuntu's Convergence the Future of Linux?

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Linux
Ubuntu

Convergence is not a word on everybody's lips. But if Canonical Software, the company that controls Ubuntu, has any say, it soon will be.

Others may be more skeptical.

Canonical describes convergence as "a single software platform that runs across smartphones, tablets, PCs, and TVs. It is designed to help make converged computing a reality: one system, one experience, multiple form factors."

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Linux Kernel 3.18.34 LTS Has OCFS2 Improvements, Updated Intel GPU Drivers, More

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Linux

Immediately after informing the community about the general availability of Linux kernel 4.1.25 LTS, kernel developer Sasha Levin published details about the release of Linux kernel 3.18.34 LTS.

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Raspberry Pi analog input board has weather station option

RasPi.TV has Kickstartered a $12 “RasPiO Analog Zero” Raspberry Pi add-on board the size of an Raspberry Pi Zero. It offers eight 10-bit analog inputs. The RasPiO Analog Zero has surpassed its Kickstarter goals, and is available through May 31 starting at 8 Pounds ($12). Designed for reading up to eight analog sensors simultaneously on a Raspberry Pi, the add-on board is matched to the size of the 65 x 30mm Raspberry Pi Zero. However, it plugs into any Pi with a 40-pin expansion connector, and can work with older 26-pin Pi models with the help of an adapter. Read more

GhostBSD 10.3 Development Continues, Now with UEFI Support for 64-bit Platforms

Today, May 25, 2016, GhostBSD maintainer Eric Turgeon announced the general availability of the second Alpha release of the upcoming GhostBSD 10.3 operating system. Read more

Samsung still undecided on their Android Wear future

Yesterday the Internet lit up like a Christmas tree with the news that Samsung was no longer going to use Android Wear for any of its Smartwatches, but it seems that might not be quite the case. The report from Fast Company cited some Samsung executives confirming that Samsung was not looking into developing any further Android Wear products. Now, In a statement provided to the Engadget website Samsung states: “We disagree with Fast Company’s interpretation. Samsung has not made any announcement concerning Android Wear and we have not changed our commitment to any of our platforms.” Read more

Meizu Pro 5 Ubuntu Edition review

The Meizu Pro 5 is the latest flagship smartphone to run on Canonical’s Ubuntu operating system. Ubuntu is designed to work across all device types – including mobile, tablets, convertibles and desktops – using a common core code. This is similar to Microsoft Windows 10 Mobile. However, unlike Microsoft’s code, Ubuntu is totally open source and has largely been developed and improved by the desktop OS’s millions-strong user base. This means the OS is capable of evolving and changing at a great pace and has update cycles that would make most sysadmins weep. Read more