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Linux

Kernel: "Secure Encrypted Virtualization" and New Blob From Nvidia

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • AMD Secure Encrypted Virtualization Updated For Linux

    While AMD's new Epyc processors have a new "Secure Encrypted Virtualization" feature, the support isn't yet mainlined in the Linux kernel but is getting closer.

  • Nvidia 384.59 Linux Graphics Driver Adds Support for GeForce GT 1030 GPUs, More

    Nvidia on Monday announced the release of a new long-lived graphics driver for Linux, FreeBSD, and Solaris-based operating systems, versioned 384.59, adding support for new GPUs, along with a bunch of bug fixes and improvements.

    Nvidia 384.59 is now considered the most advanced version of the proprietary graphics driver for GNU/Linux, FreeBSD, and Solaris platforms, which users should install on their personal computers running a supported Nvidia GPU immediately after reading this article.

Migration to Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

For an introduction to my reasons for migrating from Windows to Linux, see my previous blog post. Here I will try to stick to my experience as a Linux beginner, and hopefully inspire other developers to try it out.

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Linux Laptop: Buying New vs. Used Laptop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

There are few things in a Linux enthusiast's life more fun than buying a new Linux laptop. One could even argue that the mere act of "spec'ing out" a new unit is more exciting than the actual use of the laptop itself.

In this article, I'm going to walk you through the decision making progress of buying a new Linux laptop vs. procuring a good second hand one instead. I'll share the advantages and disadvantages to each option.

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Also: The PC business: Decline continues in Q2

IoT Framework for Edge Computing Gains Ground

Filed under
Linux
OSS
Web

In April, The Linux Foundation launched the open source EdgeX Foundry project to develop a standardized interoperability framework for Internet of Things (IoT) edge computing. Recently, EdgeX Foundry announced eight new members, bringing the total membership to 58.

The new members are Absolute, IoT Impact LABS, inwinSTACK, Parallel Machines, Queen’s University Belfast, RIOT, Toshiba Digital Solutions Corporation, and Tulip Interfaces. They join a roster that includes AMD, Analog Devices, Canonical/Ubuntu, Cloud Foundry, Dell, Linaro, Mocana, NetFoundry, Opto 22, RFMicron, and VMWare, among others.

EdgeX Foundry is built around Dell’s early stage, Apache 2.0 licensed FUSE IoT middleware framework, which offers more than a dozen microservices comprising over 125,000 lines of code. The Linux Foundation worked with Dell to launch the EdgeX Foundry after the FUSE project merged with a similar AllJoyn-compliant IoTX project led by current EdgeX members Two Bulls and Beechwood.

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Also: Tizen Experts Weekly News Recap – 23th July 2017

Android: NXP i.MX6 on Etnaviv Update

Long-Term Review: Linux Mint 18.2 "Sonya" MATE

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

A little over two weeks ago, I made the decision on what Linux distribution to install and use full-time on my personal laptop. I chose Linux Mint 18.2 "Sonya" MATE, because I felt that while it could do a bit better for total newbies in terms of usability (as some usability features have regressed since a couple of years ago), it has been a reliable and known quantity for me, and I figured that if I could generally use the live session without much hassle, it wouldn't be too much of a stretch (no pun intended) to imagine that the installed session would likely be workable. As I've covered most of the experiences of installing and using programs and getting around the desktop in my review of the live session, this post will be relatively short, covering only the salient points of the installation and some of the changes I made after the installation. Follow the jump to see more.

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Raspberry Pi computing cluster: What I'm using it for, and what I've added to it

Filed under
Linux

Last week I used every Raspberry Pi that I had to build a six-node HexaPi computing cluster.

Since then I have been asked a number of times: what is it good for? So I'm going to take a look at the last bit of the Raspberry Pi Projects - Build an OctaPi, and add a simple example of my own as well.

Oh, and I added one more Raspberry Pi server to the cluster, while still respecting my rule of 'no two servers alike', so it is actually now a HeptaPi seven-server cluster. At the end of this post I will add a description of some of the new hardware I acquired and used for this project.

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WiFi-ready Omega2 module is now available in surface-mount versions

Filed under
Linux

Onion announced two surface-mount spin-offs of the WiFi-enabled Omega2 module, which runs Linux on a MediaTek MT7688 SoC, and unveiled a new dev board.

A year after launching its second-gen Omega2 computer-on-module, which advanced from a 400MHz Atheros AR9331 to a similarly MIPS-driven 580MHz MediaTek MT7688, Onion Corp. has revised the Omega2 with two surface mount packaged versions with the same 802.11n-equipped MT7688 SoC. The Omega2S and Omega2S+ are designed for “high volume commercial and industrial OEMs,” says Onion.

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KTC partners with SERAPHIC to deliver Linux powered smart TVs in Europe

Filed under
Linux

KTC, one of the main and established end product manufacturers in China, today announced the integration of SERAPHIC’s TV browser into its Linux powered smart TVs targeting at European markets. With SERAPHIC’s TV browser, viewers have an easy and immediate access to thousands of global TV apps from mainstream TV portal providers and can choose any content or program they like.

SERAPHIC is a leading digital TV browser provider. Its competitive product offering includes browser for Freeview Play, HbbTV, YouTube TV, TV Portal, Open Browser, etc.

In the fast evolving market, Original Design Manufacturers (ODMs) like KTC have always been seeking out to enhance their competitive advantages and provide differentiating services for their customers.

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KDE's Plasma 5.10.4 in Chakra GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

4MLinux 23.0 BETA released.

Filed under
GNU
Linux

4MLinux 23.0 BETA is ready for testing. Basically, at this stage of development, 4MLinux BETA has the same features as 4MLinux STABLE, but it provides a huge number of updated packages, including a major change in the core of the system, which now uses the GNU C Library 2.25.

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Also: 4MLinux 23 Slated for Release in November 2017, to Be Supported Until July 2018

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More in Tux Machines

Servers: Boltron, OpenStack, and GoDaddy

  • Announcing Boltron: The Modular Server Preview
    The Modularity and Server Working Groups are very excited to announce the availability of the Boltron Preview Release. Boltron is a bit of an anomaly in the Fedora world — somewhere between a Spin and a preview for the future of Fedora Server Edition. You can find it, warts (known issues) and all, by following the directions below to grab a copy and try it out. Fedora’s Modularity Working Group (and others) have been working for a while on a Fedora Objective. The Objective is generically called “Modularity,” and its crux is to allow users to safely access the right versions of what they want. However, there are two major aspects of “accessing the right versions.”
  • What you need to know about hybrid cloud
    At the center of hybrid cloud solutions sits open source software, such as OpenStack, that deploys and manages large networks of virtual machines. Since its initial release in October 2010, OpenStack has been thriving globally. Some of its integrated projects and tools handle core cloud computing services, such as compute, networking, storage, and identity, while dozens of other projects can be bundled together with OpenStack to create unique and deployable hybrid cloud solutions.
  • GoDaddy Drops Curtain on Its Cloud Business… Again
    Launched only a year ago, Cloud Servers was never intended to go after the big guys — AWS, Azure, GCP, and the like — and had no dreams of competing for well-heeled, big-business customers. Instead, it was hoping to position itself as a gateway to the cloud for small and medium sized businesses wanting to test the waters. In other words, it was hoping to take on DigitalOcean and Linode. It was also undoubtedly hoping to leverage the substantial base of its hosting business and convince some of those customers that their lives would only improve if they made a move to the cloud.

Kernel: "Secure Encrypted Virtualization" and New Blob From Nvidia

  • AMD Secure Encrypted Virtualization Updated For Linux
    While AMD's new Epyc processors have a new "Secure Encrypted Virtualization" feature, the support isn't yet mainlined in the Linux kernel but is getting closer.
  • Nvidia 384.59 Linux Graphics Driver Adds Support for GeForce GT 1030 GPUs, More
    Nvidia on Monday announced the release of a new long-lived graphics driver for Linux, FreeBSD, and Solaris-based operating systems, versioned 384.59, adding support for new GPUs, along with a bunch of bug fixes and improvements. Nvidia 384.59 is now considered the most advanced version of the proprietary graphics driver for GNU/Linux, FreeBSD, and Solaris platforms, which users should install on their personal computers running a supported Nvidia GPU immediately after reading this article.

Security: BKK, Password Managers, Kaspersky, Fruitfly, WHISTL, IoT and More

  • 18 year old guy arrested for reporting a shamefully stupid bug in the new Budapest e-Ticket system
     

    This last one was the one found by the 18 year old gentleman I started my story with. According to him, he doesn't even know how to program yet (he'll start the university this autumn). He just used the developer tools in the browser, that everybody has access to, saw that the price was being sent back to the server when he was about to make a purchase, and tried if he could change it. A monthly pass costs 9500HUF (about 30EUR) and he modified the price to 50HUF. When he got the confirmation that it worked and was able to see his pass in the app, he immediately emailed the BKK (the Transport Authority) that there was a serious problem. He got an email that his pass was invalidated, but otherwise they didn't get back to him. Instead, when it got leaked out to the press, and in a few hours everyone were talking about the above issues (not just this one), BKK together with T-Sytems Hungary started to what I would call massively covering their arses.  

  • How to use a password manager (and why you really should)
     

    Password managers remove both of these problems by generating and storing complex passwords for you. The password manager lives in your browser and acts a digital gatekeeper, filling in your login info when you need to get on a certain site. You just have to remember one (very secure!) master password for the manager itself, and everything else is taken care of for you. (For a quick introduction on creating a secure but memorable master password, check out this article.)  

  • US local govts still using Kaspersky software despite federal ban
     

    US local government agencies across the country are continuing to use software from Kaspersky Lab even though the federal government removed the company from a list of approved software suppliers for two government-wide purchasing contracts that are used to buy technology services.  

  • “Perverse” malware infecting hundreds of Macs remained undetected for years
    Besides the means of infection being unknown, the exact purpose of the malware is also unclear. Wardle said he found no evidence the malware can be used to install ransomware or collect banking credentials. That largely removes the possibility that Fruitfly developers were motivated by financial profit. At the same time, the concentration of home users largely rules out chances the malware was designed by state-sponsored hackers to spy on targets.
  • Exclusive: WHISTL Labs will be Cyber Range for Medical Devices
     

    The facilities, dubbed WHISTL, will adopt a model akin to the Underwriters Laboratory, which tests electrical devices, but will focus on issues related to cyber security and privacy, helping medical device makers “address the public health challenges” created by connected health devices and complex, connected healthcare environments, according to a statement by The Medical Device Innovation, Safety and Security Consortium (MDISS).

  • Smart fridges and TVs should carry security rating, police chief says
     

    Barton, the national policing lead for crime operations, proposed the idea as part of efforts to protect households from fraudsters and hackers in the era of the Internet of Things, where otherwise “dumb” devices can be put online and be interconnected for automation and smart appliance activities.

  • 'Devil's Ivy' Is Another Wake-Up Call for IoT Security

Fedora and Red Hat: Fedora Elections, Rawhide Notes, Financial Analysis