Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Microsoft

Bruce Perens: Microsoft and Apache - What's the Angle?

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

itmanagement.earthweb.com: For a decade, Microsoft was open source's worst enemy, combating it at every turn. But last week Microsoft joined the Apache open source project as a platinum sponsor, promising to put $100,000 per year into a project that beats its own IIS (Internet Information Services) in the market. Microsoft also made some of their patents available for use in GPL software like Linux without a royalty. Has Redmond given up the fight? Or is this just their latest strategy?

Microsoft Applauds Victory Over Linux and Open Source

Filed under
Microsoft

softpedia.com: The Redmond company, once the epitome of the proprietary software business model, stopped nothing short of declaring an all out victory over Linux and open source at the company's Financial Analyst Meeting 2008 the past week.

Also: Microsoft's open source guru faces slings and arrows
And: Microsoft’s Dana Perino problem with open source

Is Microsoft getting ready to kill Windows?

Filed under
Microsoft

blogs.computerworld: No, I’m not talking about killing Vista. Microsoft is already burying that living dead operating system as fast it can. I’m talking about killing Windows itself. That’s the conclusion I’ve drawn from David Worthington’s story about Microsoft’s plans for Midori, a next generation operating system.

Microsoft, its time to officially rescind the Linux lawsuit threats

Filed under
Microsoft

networkworld.com: At this point in the game, Microsoft should really come clean with a statement that rescinds its Linux/patent/suing threat altogether. The fact is, we are seeing actions by Microsoft that indicate that the "suing Linux users" jig is up.

Also: Microsoft: still a business of threats?

Should We Fear the (Microsoft) Geeks, Bearing Gifts?

Filed under
Microsoft

Glyn Moody: One of the most interesting journeys being undertaken at the moment in computing is that of Microsoft towards open source. Let's look at [each step] in turn.

Is Microsoft really any more trustworthy?

Filed under
Microsoft

practical-tech.com: Lately, Microsoft has been trying really, really hard to appear as open source’s best friend. All I can say is: “With friends like these, who needs enemies?”

Also: Could Microsoft actually be getting an open-source clue?

Microsoft Joins the ASF: Can They Be Trusted?

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

ostatic.com: Microsoft announced on Friday that it would be joining the Apache Software Foundation, which costs $100,000/year and is the highest level of sponsorship that the foundation offers. Bruce Perens, a well-known open-source advocate, cautioned on Slashdot that "there's much reason for caution."

Mojave, strength of the Bear, speed of the Puma?

Filed under
Microsoft

bushweed.blogspot: So, Microsoft decided to pull some publicity about Vista by inventing a name, and showcasing it under that name. This is what they did:

tigers and elephants

Filed under
Microsoft

opensource.org: Gandhiji said "First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win." If we do not allow Microsoft to join us, we can never "win".

Microsoft and Its Open-Source Plans

Filed under
Microsoft

eweek.com: Microsoft is now a major sponsor of the Apache Software Foundation and is putting its protocols and formats into a royalty-free licens, all part of a larger open-source push.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Tiny quad-core ARM mini-PC runs Ubuntu with Cinnamon

A startup is pitching a $129-$199 “Imp” mini-PC on Indiegogo based on a quad-core Odroid-U3 SBC, with HDMI streaming and an Ubuntu/Cinnamon Linux desktop. A day after reporting on one Israeli-based, non-Android ARM mini-PC — SolidRun’s $100 CuBoxTV with OpenElec Linux — here comes another. Aside from the usual hyperbole found on crowdfunding pages — are we really “democratizing the digital home experience” or just buying an embedded ARM computer? — the Ubuntu-based Imp mini-PC looks like a pretty good deal. Read more

Ready to give Linux a try? These are the 5 distros you need to consider

There are so many Linux distributions that choosing one can be overwhelming for a new user. One might be too intimidating for a user to even try, while another might be too simplified, blocking that user from knowing how Linux systems actually function. I have been using Linux as my primary OS since 2005 and have tried all major (and quite a lot of minor) distributions. I have learned that not every distribution is for everyone. Since I also assist people in migrating to Linux, I have chosen the 5 distros that I recommend to new users based on their level of comfort and desire to learn (or not learn) more about Linux. Read more

Review of the new Firefox browser built for developers

Mozilla recently announced a new browser version for developers on the 10th anniversary of the Firefox browser. The Usersnap team and I took a look at whether it works well for the web development process, offers developers a variety of possible applications, and if it keeps up with the Google Chrome dev tools. Read more

Mapping the world with open source

In the world of geospatial technology, closed source solutions have been the norm for decades. But the tides are slowly turning as open source GIS software is gaining increasing prominence. Paul Ramsey, senior strategist at the open source company Boundless, is one of the people trying to change that. Ramsey has been working with geospatial software for over ten years, as programmer and consultant. He founded the PostGIS spatial database project in 2001, and is currently an active developer and member of the project steering committee. Ramsey serves as an evangelist for OpenGeo Suite, works with the Boundless business development team to share about their collection of offerigns, and speaks and teaches regularly at conferences around the world. Read more