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Microsoft

Microsoft's chickens are coming home to roost

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Microsoft

blogbeebe.blogspot: Microsoft's brand power has been in sharp decline over the past four years, an indication the company is losing credibility and mindshare with U.S. business users, according to a recent study by market research firm CoreBrand.

M$ stuff

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Microsoft
  • All That Got Stolen Was Microsoft's Thunder

  • Microsoft makes final heroic grab for OOXML votes
  • How Microsoft killed ODF
  • Microsoft OOXML standardization bid: The clock is ticking
  • Should Microsoft be afraid of Linux?

Why we still hate Microsoft

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Microsoft

Dana Blankenhorn: I’m not trying to be political here. But what seems to upset most people about Hillary Clinton, and Bill Clinton for that matter, is this habit of parsing. Microsoft also likes to have it both ways. They want to be seen as cooperating with open source, but

Yahoo is the Reason for Microsoft's New Open Source Stance

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Microsoft

ostatic.com: It's not every day that a Microsoft executive as highly placed as senior vice president, corporate secretary and general counsel Brad Smith shows up at an open source conference, but he made an appearance at the Open Source Business Conference in San Francisco this week. What people keep missing is how Microsoft's proposed Yahoo deal would force it to embrace open source.

A Microsoft Slur in the OOXML Saga -- Did I Tell You or Did I Tell You?

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Microsoft

groklaw.net: The New Zealand Open Source Society is reporting that an employee at Microsoft New Zealand recently sent an email to one of the technical bodies advising an NB involved in the OOXML ISO process, smearing a man's reputation, Matthew Holloway, apparently to undermine his technical input which was critical of OOXML.

Microsoft +/vs. Novell: The rich irony of then and now

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Microsoft
SUSE

Matt Asay: There is a tragic (but rich) irony in the news that Microsoft failed in its appeal to throw out Novell's decade-old antitrust lawsuit against it. On one hand, you have Novell arguing (rightly) in court that Microsoft unfairly bullies competitors. On the other hand, we see Novell supping at the feet of Microsoft to revive its Linux business.

Microsoft and Novell: The Ultimate Love-Hate Relationship

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Microsoft
SUSE
  • Microsoft and Novell: The Ultimate Love-Hate Relationship

  • Novell to Announce New, Expanded Partnerships
  • Supreme Court won’t block Novell’s antitrust suit against Microsoft
  • Novell CEO Looks to the Future
  • ActivIdentity, Novell integrate products
  • Compellent Adds Novell Yes Certified Products

What if... Windows went open source?

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Microsoft

itwire.com: When Microsoft talks about open source, people in the FOSS community tend to generally take it with a pinch - or more likely a kilo - of salt. Revealing the crown jewels of its empire - the Windows source code - has never ever been canvassed.

Also: Windows 7 eyed by antitrust regulators

SFLC Publishes Analysis of M$'s Open Specification Promise

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Microsoft

softwarefreedom.org: The Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC), provider of pro-bono legal services to protect and advance free and open source software, today published a paper that considers the legal implications of Microsoft's Open Specification Promise (OSP) and explains why it should not be relied upon by developers concerned about patent risk.

Also: Lost in the OOXML Fog

Microsoft makes online Office play, but not for Linux

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Microsoft

tectonic.co.za: Microsoft yesterday announced a beta of its Microsoft Office Live Workspace beta, an online platform were users can store documents and share them with others. Reviews of Microsoft Office Live Workspace have been varied but if you’re running Linux you won’t get to use the Live Workspace at all.

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