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Microsoft

Ubuntu's Secure Boot support vulnerability threatens even Windows PCs

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Ubuntu is thwarting Microsoft’s efforts to keep PCs safe. Modern Windows PCs are required to ship with Secure Boot enabled, a safety measure that limits access to Microsoft-approved operating systems. To make life easier for Linux users, Microsoft provides Linux distribution bootloaders with a Microsoft signing key. But Ubuntu’s signed bootloader will happily boot unsigned code, breaking the whole chain of trust. Thankfully, this is set to change with the upcoming Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

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German City That Replaced Windows with Linux to Ditch Last Windows XP/2000 PCs

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Munich is a pioneer of the transition from Windows to Linux, as the city invested millions of euros in giving up on Microsoft software and embracing the open-source alternative, and it’s now ready to finally ditch the very last PCs still running Windows.

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What a Linux User Misses From Windows

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Recently I found myself thinking back to when I first started using Linux, roughly thirteen years ago. Back then, I was dual-booting with Windows because Linux was merely a curiosity for me and something interesting to explore. Today, I use Linux exclusively.

It's not only my go-to platform, I simply couldn't imagine using anything else. In this article, I'll explore some things I miss about using Windows. This isn't to say I miss Windows, because I honestly don't. But there are elements of the Windows experience, that I've found myself missing lately.

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8 Reasons to Switch from Windows 10 to Linux

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Windows 10 has been out in the wild for a while now. For the most part, people have been really liking it. It’s probably the most streamlined version of Microsoft’s operating system to date. Still, some people aren’t happy with the upgrade and are looking at alternatives.

Introducing Linux: it’s a free and open source platform which many operating systems are built upon. If you’re looking to move from Windows to an alternative, here are eight compelling reasons why you should leave Microsoft for a more free and open source operating system.

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Emulation and Windows

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Gaming
  • 1.4.0 released! - Year end report

    Along with the release comes our year end report for 2015. The following progress report will provide an overview of all the notable changes from the previous stable version, 1.2.1, to this update. Keep in mind many of the changes have been mentioned in previous progress reports, but are mentioned again as a changelog for 1.4.0. The changes since 1.2.1 are so many, some smaller, some quite massive, that it was impossible to write about all of them, but we believe we have nailed all the highlights!

  • Powerful PCSX2 PlayStation 2 Emulator for Linux and Windows Receives Massive Update

    Today, January 8, 2016, the developers of the PCSX2 software, an open source and cross-platform PlayStation 2 emulator for GNU/Linux, Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows operating systems, were proud to announce the release of PCSX2 1.4.0.

  • Non-Linux FOSS: Open-Source Windows?

    I have mixed emotions about ReactOS. It's open source. It's freely available. But, its goal is to be binary-compatible with Windows! ReactOS is not a Linux operating system. In fact, it doesn't share the UNIX architecture at all. It looks like Windows NT, and it behaves much like Windows NT.

Microsoft Loves Linux?!

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Gaming
  • Ori and the Blind Forest won't come to Linux for now, thanks to Microsoft

    Other Microsoft published games have made their way to Linux, so it's not out of the question. It depends what sort of publishing deal they signed, still a damn shame though.

  • Microsoft Blocks Linux Game Port From Happening

    The reference was in regards to a Linux port of Ori and the Blind Forest, a single-player adventure game developed by Moon Studios and originally released earlier this year. Ori is powered by the Unity Engine, which would make a Linux port possible, but apparently the publishing deal with Microsoft Studios would prevent the game from being released outside of Microsoft platforms.

Op-Ed: Microsoft makes it more difficult to run Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

There are numerous computer operating systems (OS) other than the various versions of Windows and this includes well over 100 distributions of Linux-based systems.

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5 ways Ubuntu Linux is better than Microsoft Windows 10

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Windows 10 is a pretty good desktop operating system. Unfortunately, that OS is very far from perfect. The most glaring issue, of course, is the confusing privacy settings. Plus, let us not forget the arguably shady tactics Microsoft is employing to get users to upgrade to the operating system. While Windows 10 is more focused than its predecessor, there is still a lack of consistency, such as having a Settings Menu and separate Control Panel menu.

Meanwhile, in the land of Linux, Ubuntu hit 15.10; an evolutionary upgrade, which is a joy to use. While not perfect, the totally free Unity desktop-based Ubuntu gives Windows 10 a run for its money. Does this mean I think Linux will soon rule the desktop? Absolutely not. Windows will still be dominant in number of installs for the foreseeable future. With that said, more does not always mean better. Here are 5 ways Ubuntu bests Windows 10.

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Is Lubuntu Faster Than Windows XP And Frankly Who Cares?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Scientifically there is a reason Windows XP slows down over time and it is due to the file allocation table and the fragmentation of the hard drive.

When you start with a freshly installed system all the files are at the start of the disk. As files are added and deleted they space out over the disk, leaving gaps.

A recommended performance improvement for Windows XP is to defragment the hard drive.

All of those Windows engineers couldn't have been wrong for all those years could they?

No they weren't.

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Security: GNU/Linux Versus Windows

Filed under
Microsoft
Security
  • Towards (reasonably) trustworthy x86 laptops

    Can we build trustworthy client systems on x86 hardware? What are the main challenges? What can we do about them, realistically? Is there anything we can?

  • Recently Bought a Windows Computer? Microsoft Probably Has Your Encryption Key [Ed: yes, flawed by design]

    One of the excellent features of new Windows devices is that disk encryption is built-in and turned on by default, protecting your data in case your device is lost or stolen. But what is less well-known is that, if you are like most users and login to Windows 10 using your Microsoft account, your computer automatically uploaded a copy of your recovery key – which can be used to unlock your encrypted disk – to Microsoft’s servers, probably without your knowledge and without an option to opt-out.

    During the “crypto wars” of the nineties, the National Security Agency developed an encryption backdoor technology – endorsed and promoted by the Clinton administration – called the Clipper chip, which they hoped telecom companies would use to sell backdoored crypto phones. Essentially, every phone with a Clipper chip would come with an encryption key, but the government would also get a copy of that key – this is known as key escrow – with the promise to only use it in response to a valid warrant. But due to public outcry and the availability of encryption tools like PGP, which the government didn’t control, the Clipper chip program ceased to be relevant by 1996. (Today, most phone calls still aren’t encrypted. You can use the free, open source, backdoorless Signal app to make encrypted calls.)

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • Wireshark 2.0.5 Released — World’s Most Popular Network Traffic Analyzer
    Wireshark is widely used as the primary network protocol analyzer by security researchers all across the world. Wireshark 2.0.5, the latest maintenance update, is now available for download with various security fixes and updated network protocols.
  • ownCloud 9.1 Community Edition Cloud Server Adds Innovative Security Features
    ownCloud announced the availability of the first major release for the 9.x series of the open-source self-hosting cloud server software for GNU/Linux operating systems recently. ownCloud 9.1 Community Edition is now the latest stable and most advanced release of the ownCloud Server, which promises dozens of attractive new features, among which we can mention a bunch of innovative security enhancements, such as support for token-based authentication sessions and pluggable authentication support. Additionally, ownCloud 9.1 introduces the ability to list all the devices that are connected to your personal user page, from where you'll be able to invalidate certain session. Device specific tokens are supported as well in the ownCloud 9.1 release, giving users new ways to control the access to their personal and private cloud servers.
  • Deluge 1.3.13 Free BitTorrent Client Adds an Extremely Large Set of Bugfixes
    It's been a while since we last heard something from the Deluge project, an open-source and cross-platform BitTorrent client that's available for GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows operating systems. Deluge is quite a popular software for downloading torrent files over the Internet, and it comes with pretty much everything you would expect from a BitTorrent client, including protocol encryption, Universal Plug and Play (UPnP), Distributed Hash Table (DHT), uTorrent Peer Exchange, wet-PMP, and, of course, the ability to manage the program remotely via a web browser.
  • Krita 3.0.1 Coming September 5, First Development Builds Are Out Now for Testing
    Now that the final release of the Krita 3.0 digital painting software has been released for our personal computers, the time has come for the project's development team to concentrate their efforts on the first point release.
  • Docker Built-in Orchestration Ready for Production: Docker 1.12 Goes GA
  • Docker 1.12 App Container Engine Officially Released with Built-in Orchestration
    Docker, the award-winning and widely-used open-source application container engine, has just released a major milestone that introduces approximately 100 changes since the previous stable update. That's right, Docker 1.12.0 is finally here after being in development for the past two months, during which it received a total of five Release Candidate (RC) builds that have been seeded to public testers and those who wanted an early taste of what's coming to the final Docker 1.12 release. "We wanted to thank everyone in the community for helping us achieve this great milestone of making Docker 1.12 generally available for production environments. Docker 1.12 adds the largest and most sophisticated set of features into a single release since the beginning of the Docker project," reads the release announcement.
  • The State of GIMP & Its Future

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Latest Vendetta Online Update Brings VR Improvements, Oculus Rift 1.6 Support
    Guild Software announced earlier today, July 30, 2016, the availability of the latest updates for its cross-platform, commercial, and popular Vendetta Online massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG). A total of three small updates have been released for Vendetta Online since our last report three weeks ago, when Vendetta Online 1.8.380 was released for PCs (Linux, Mac, and Windows) with lots of goodies and multiple improvements.
  • ‘Stardew Valley’ Now Available On Mac And Linux
    Back in June, it was confirmed that the game will be making its way to the Wii U, Xbox One and PlayStation 4.
  • New Steam Beta Client Adds Numerous Steam Controller Improvements, More
    Today July 30, 2016, Valve has pushed yet another update for its Steam Client to the Beta channel on all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows. Steam Client Beta Update July 29 was announced today, despite its name, and it only introduces support for the upcoming Windows Anniversary Update that will be made available on August 2, 2016, as well as numerous improvements and a handful of new features for the Steam Controller device.
  • The TORCS Racing Car Simulator Should Now Be Slightly Faster With Gallium3D
    For those playing TORCS, The Open Racing Simulator, its performance for this driving game simulator should be slightly faster if using one of Mesa's Gallium3D drivers. AMD developer Marek Olšák has landed a complete rewrite of state atoms inside the Gallium3D Mesa state tracker. Long story short, Marek concluded his commit message by mentioned, "torcs is 2% faster between the previous patch and the end of this series." Every little bit counts in making the open-source driver stack more competitive. With this being in the vendor-neutral Mesa state tracker code, it should presumably also help the Nouveau driver too, in addition to RadeonSI/R600g.

Red Hat Financial News

Voyager 16.04.1 LTS Adds Intel Skylake Support, Based on Xubuntu 16.04.1 LTS

The guys over Voyager, a Xubuntu-based GNU/Linux distribution built around the lightweight Xfce desktop environment, have announced the release of Voyager 16.04.1 LTS. Read more