Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Microsoft

Microsoft responds to GPL violations

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS
  • The Microsoft Linux GPLv2 contribution saga unfolds

  • Falling profits forced Microsoft's open source hand
  • Microsoft and Vyatta rebutt reports of GPL violation
  • Microsoft wants to be part of Unique Identity project: Bill Gates

Microsoft Patches Linux; Linus Responds

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

linux-mag.com: Microsoft has released code for inclusion in the Linux kernel, but should it be accepted? Linus Torvalds gives his perspective.

Red Hat lauds, criticizes Microsoft's Linux efforts

Filed under
Microsoft

infoworld.com: While applauding Microsoft's contribution of code to the Linux community this week, Red Hat nonetheless urged its rival to pledge that it will never use its patents against Linux.

Microsoft and Linux: A Checkered Past

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

networkworld.com: Microsoft has had a checkered past with both Linux and its open source GPL licensing structure, so the move was a jaw dropper. Here is a look at some of the milestones since Microsoft internal memos leaked in 1998 that attacked the open source Linux operating system as it began to pick up steam as an alternative to Windows.

Microsoft Making Peace With Linux? Not So Fast

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Microsoft Making Peace With Linux? Not So Fast

  • Is Microsoft's GPL2 support really a big deal?
  • How Microsoft made open source selfish
  • Microsoft Foresees More Open Source Contributions
  • Microsoft code cannot taint Linux

Desktop Linux or Windows 7?

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

earthweb.com: With the recession in full swing, I have found a growing number of people questioning the value of moving onto Windows 7 upon its release.

Linux slips into Microsoft's warm, deadly embrace

Filed under
Microsoft

infoworld.com: Make no mistake: This is a hostile action on Microsoft's part. Its stated mission is to squash Linux like a bug, and the easiest way to do that is to feign friendship -- to offer a bogus olive branch, then switch it out at the last minute for a nasty bundle of thorns.

Pigs do fly: Microsoft unleashes 20,000 lines of Linux code

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Pigs do fly: Microsoft unleashes 20,000 lines of Linux code

  • Virtualization, cloud underlie Microsoft's Linux kernel submission
  • Microsoft embraces GPL, opens Hyper-V to Linux with LinuxIC
  • Microsoft Delivers Code to the Linux Kernel – with help from Novell

  • Microsoft embraces Linux cancer to sell Windows servers
  • Microsoft donates code to Linux: Remember, folks, what comes after 'Embrace'
  • Microsoft contributes to Linux kernel: a CAOS Theory Q&A
  • Understanding Microsoft's Linux code shocker
  • It's getting cold in here

Microsoft's next operating system may start from BSD

Filed under
Microsoft

advogato.org: Barelfish. Have anybody heard such a beast? Not somewhere behind the steel walls - in the academic silence of ETH university Microsoft is building the next generation of its operating system.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Debian-Based Distribution Updated With KDE 3.5 Forked Desktop

Q4OS 1.2 "Orion" is the new release that is re-based on Debian Jessie, focused on shipping its own desktop utilities and customizations, and designed to run on both old and new hardware. Read more

Atom Shell is now Electron

Atom Shell is now called Electron. You can learn more about Electron and what people are building with it at its new home electron.atom.io. Read more Also: C++ Daddy Bjarne Stroustrup outlines directions for v17

A Fedora 22 beta walk-through

The new Fedora, with its GNOME 3.16 interface, is an interesting, powerful Linux desktop. Read more Also: Web software center for Fedora Red Hat's Cross-Selling and Product Development Will Power Long-Term Growth Red Hat Updates Open Source Developer and Admin Tools

Unix and Personal Computers: Reinterpreting the Origins of Linux

So, to sum up: What Linus Torvalds, along with plenty of other hackers in the 1980s and early 1990s, wanted was a Unix-like operating system that was free to use on the affordable personal computers they owned. Access to source code was not the issue, because that was already available—through platforms such as Minix or, if they really had cash to shell out, by obtaining a source license for AT&T Unix. Therefore, the notion that early Linux programmers were motivated primarily by the ideology that software source code should be open because that is a better way to write it, or because it is simply the right thing to do, is false. Read more Also: Anti-Systemd People