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Microsoft

Microsoft sends mixed patent message

Filed under
Microsoft

blogs.zdnet.com: In the wake of the Open Invention Network challenge to Microsoft’s patents related to Linux, the company’s good cop-bad cop routine has gone into overdrive.

Time is ripe for Microsoft to buy Novell

Filed under
Microsoft
SUSE

itwire.com: This week was a historic one for Microsoft with the firm reporting its biggest drop in both quarterly profits and revenue in its 23-year history as a public entity.

We Put the "No" In Innovation!

Filed under
Microsoft

linuxtoday.com: A general rule of marketing is "The more noise they make, the less they have to crow about." Who makes the most noise about "innovation"? I bet you can guess....

Windows 7 and the Linux lesson

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

theregister.co.uk: You may love Linux or hate it, but when a distribution is complete, there's very little hesitation by commercial operators when it comes to getting the completed operating system out there.

The year of the fall of the Windows desktop

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: This is the type of nonsense people try to drum up readers for an article with. Just to get folks riled up. "The Year of..." is ridiculous in general. It's also very relative.

Linux Will Crush Windows 7 on Netbooks

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Microsoft
  • Are netbooks really junky?

  • Why Linux Will Crush Windows 7 on Netbooks
  • Netbooks: a Linux appliance opportunity
  • Sign of the times: Microsoft sales drop?

ECIS Provides A History of Microsoft's AntiCompetitive Behavior

Filed under
Microsoft

groklaw.net: It is, to the best of my knowledge, the first time that the issue of Microsoft's patent threats against Linux have been presented to a regulatory body as evidence of anticompetitive conduct.

The offensive Microsoft anti-Linux netbook offensive

Filed under
Microsoft

itwire.com: Ever since the unexpected advent of netbooks Microsoft has been working to push Linux out. Microsoft have reminded us they’re a proprietary company with the offensive Windows 7 Starter Edition being limited to three apps only. Are they trying to insult us or what?

Also: Will Microsoft blow its netbook lead with Windows 7 crippleware?

Has Microsoft lost its war on open source?

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Microsoft

infoworld.com: Is Microsoft a friend or foe of open source? Going by the company's actions, Microsoft can't seem to decide whether to make love or war. But if it's war, Microsoft appears to lack the legal weaponry to defeat or even disturb its adversaries.

The difference between Linux and Windows

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

blogs.computerworld: As Windows 7, Ubuntu 9.04 and Fedora 11 all approach their launch dates, I've been thinking about the differences in how they're created and released.

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Debian Now Defaults To Xfce On Non-x86 Desktops

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Phoenix Is Trying To Be An Open Version Of Apple's Swift

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Google Chromebook quietly takes aim at the enterprise

Google's Chromebook is a cheap alternative to a more expensive Windows or Mac PC or laptop, but up until recently it lacked any specific administrative oversight tools for enterprise IT. While IT might have liked the price tag, they may have worried about the lack of an integrated tool suite for managing a fleet of Chromebooks. That's changed with release of Chromebook for Work, a new program designed to give IT that control they crave for Chromebooks. Read more