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Microsoft

Microsoft Being Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Bing Is Pushing Malware When You Search for Chrome

    You launch Edge on your new PC, search for “download Chrome,” and click the first result headed to “google.com” on Bing. You’re now on a phishing website pushing malware, disguised to look like the Chrome download page.

    [...]

    Microsoft is apparently not verifying the web address the advertisement actually goes to. Bing is letting this advertisement lie people.

  • How to build LineageOS on Windows 10 using Windows Subsystem for Linux [Ed: Microsoft EEE against Android next? Devouring it using Vista 10 and WSL spyware (letting Microsoft spy on Linux too)?]
  • Microsoft completes GitHub acquisition

    Friedman had previously promised “We are not buying GitHub to turn it into Microsoft.” Still, alongside its $26.2 acquisition of LinkedIn, Microsoft now has a unique insight into developers and the tech industry job market. Many will question what Microsoft expects from its $7.5 billion investment, and the company will now be able to move ahead with its plans for GitHub and reassure its community of more than 28 million developers.

The Openwashing of Microsoft and EEE Has Already Begun (Using GitHub to Move Developers to Azure)

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Microsoft

Microsoft Openwashing and FUD

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Microsoft
  • Open Source Continues to Intimidate Many Developers [Ed: This makes no sense. The code being visible doesn't make things any harder. Than again, look who wrote this. It's a longtime Microsoft propagandist Nick Kolakowski. They just everything based on a repository of Microsoft]]

    The open-source community seems healthy (and expanding), but there are always developers who haven’t contributed so much as a single line of code to a Github repo. According to Digital Ocean, which surveyed more than 4,300 tech pros, the reasons those developers haven’t gotten more involved in open source are pretty straightforward: They’re often intimidated, and they don’t know where to start.

    Of those who hadn’t yet gotten involved in open source, 45 percent claimed it was difficult to get started, while 44 percent said they didn’t have the right skills to contribute to a codebase. Another 30 percent said their companies hadn’t given them time to contribute, and 28 percent cited the aforementioned intimidation factor.

  • Windows Phone Internals now Open Source [Ed: Misleading headline. All the internals are still proprietary, project name misleading.]

    Like any good hacker in that position, instead of just disappearing, he has made his project, WPInternals, open source, meaning any good developer can take over his work, to update, modify or bug fix.

  • Windows Phone Internals bootloader unlocking tool goes open source
  • Windows 10 Mobile's bootloader unlocker is now open source
  • Plume and Samsung Launch OpenSync Open Source Initiative [Ed: Openwashing of surveillance]

Linux vs. Windows: An Objective Look at Both Operating Systems

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Linux over recent years has made huge leaps in usability. Distributions like Linux Mint have made installation and setup simple. Even non-technical users can install software and do normal day-to-day activities like web browsing, answering email, playing music or watching video.

Read more

Windows Self-Destructs Again

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Microsoft
  • After File Deletion, Windows 10 October Update Has Font Issues Too

    According to numerous reports, the recently launched Windows 10 October Update is causing font issues on users’ PC. It seems like many users are dealing with some kind of “broken fronts” where font on Windows programs is getting distorted, making it impossible to read the text.

    At first, it was only a few Windows apps but now users are complaining that the Windows system settings and even web browsers are showing the same broken fronts.

    In a Reddit post, people reported that they are facing broken fronts while opening web browsers like Google Chrome.

  • Zip it! 3 more reasons to be glad you didn't jump on Windows 10 1809

    The problems with the Windows 10 October 2018 Update just keep on rolling in as users complain of borked zip file extraction, broken fonts and iffy brightness controls.

    The infamous file deletion bug and blue screen reports have drowned out other issues somewhat. So, allow us to present a round-up that could have been titled "Should have kept the testing team on, eh?"

Openwashing and Microsoft FUD Against FOSS

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Microsoft
OSS

Windows 10 October Update Once Again Plagued By Another File Management Bug

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Microsoft

Since the announcement of Windows 10 October update 2018, things have been going pretty bad for Windows users. At first, it was the file deletion which caused a lot of inconvenience to Windows users, and later the driver issues.

Now, people have come across another Windows 1809 bug which appears to be another File Explorer issue. Several users on Reddit and Ask Woody have reported an unusual activity while extracting files.

The primary issue revolves around the prompt which should technically appear during the process of un-zipping a file on Windows 10; however, it does not, leading to data loss.

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Microsoft Entryism/EEE Now a Step Further

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Microsoft

[Ed: Rant warning]

Love Microsoft Teams? Love Linux? Then you won't love this

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft loves Linux. Unless you are a Linux user who happens to want to use Teams. In that case, you probably aren’t feeling the love quite so much.

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Microsoft Lies and Openwashing

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Microsoft
OSS
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More in Tux Machines

Excellent Utilities: lnav – the log file navigator

This is the second in a new series highlighting best-of-breed utilities. We’ll be covering a wide range of utilities including tools that boost your productivity, help you manage your workflow, and lots more besides. For this article, we’ll put lnav under the spotlight. lnav is a curses-based utility for viewing and analyzing log files. The software is designed to extract useful information from log files, making it easy to perform advanced queries. Think of lnav as an enhanced log file viewer. For many years system and kernel logs were handled by a utility called syslogd. Most Linux-based operating systems have since moved to systemd, which has a journal. That’s a giant log file for the whole system. Various software and services write their log entries into systemd’s journalctl. lnav can consume the JSON version of journalctl’s output. And it supports a wide range of other log formats. For systems running systemd-journald, you can also use lnav as the pager. We included a couple of log analyzers in our Essential System Tools feature. And lnav wouldn’t be totally out of place in that feature. lnav is optimized for small-scale deployments. Read more

Android Leftovers

Today in Techrights

Video/Audio: Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Edition, Open Source Security Podcast, This Week in Linux, Linux Gaming News Punch, Linux Action News, GNU World Order and Talk Python to Me

  • What’s New in Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Desktop Edition
    Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Edition is official Manjaro Linux flavour with Deepin Desktop Environment 15.8 as default desktop environment includes several deepin applications a free open source software. Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Edition is powered by the latest Long-Term Support of Linux Kernel 4.19, include pamac version 7.3. in manjaro 18.0, The Manjaro Settings Manager (MSM) now provides an easy-to-use graphical interface for installing and removing the many series of kernels. At the time of this release, eight kernel-series are available directly from manjaro binary repositories, from 3.16 series to the latest 4.19 release.
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 142 - Hypothetical security: what if you find a USB flash drive?
    Josh and Kurt talk about what one could do if you find a USB drive. The context is based on the story where the Secret Service was rumored to have plugged a malicious USB drive into a computer. The purpose of discussion is to explore how to handle a situation like this in the real world. We end the episode with a fantastic comparison of swim safety and security.
  • Episode 64 | This Week in Linux
    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we got a lot of releases week. Ubuntu and all of the Flavours have released 19.04 versions along with an interesting update from the Ubuntu derivative Pop!_OS. The KDE Community announced the availability of a bunch of new versions of various KDE Applications.
  • Linux Gaming News Punch - Episode 9
    Coming in hot (please save me from this heat) is the ninth episode of the Linux Gaming News Punch, your weekly round-up of some interesting bits of news. For regular readers, as always this might not be too helpful but for those who don't visit too often this should help keep you updated.
  • Linux Action News 102
    Ubuntu 19.04 is released we share our take, OpenSSH has an important release, and Mozilla brings Python to the browser. Also WebThings is launched and we think it might have a shot.
  • GNU World Order 13x17
  • Talk Python to Me: #208 Packaging, Making the most of PyCon, and more
    Are you going to PyCon (or a similar conference)? Join me and Kenneth Retiz as we discuss how to make the most of PyCon and what makes it special for each of us.