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Microsoft

Keith Curtis to make "Software Wars" movie

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Mac

keithcu.com: So I guess I’m making a movie:

Seven Signs that You Have Been Brainwashed by Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft
Humor

linuxmigrante.blogspot: Considering the last event's I've been able to observe, as well as Mechatotoro's contributions, I compiled this short list of manifestations of a Microsoft-only mentality, just for fun.

The Slim Possibility That Microsoft's SUSE Deal Could Be Good for Linux

Filed under
Microsoft
SUSE

linuxinsider.com (blog safari): Well July has come and gone for another year here in the Linux blogosphere, and not a moment too soon. It was a Microsoft-filled month, and that trend continued right up until the very end.

SUSE & Patent FUD: Who Do We Boycott Now?

Filed under
Microsoft
Web
SUSE

fossforce.com: Now that Microsoft and SUSE have announced they plan to continue sleeping together, I wonder if the folks at Techrights are rethinking their plans to pull the plug on Boycott Novell?

MS-DOS is 30 years old today

Filed under
Microsoft

extremetech.com: Thirty years ago, on July 27 1981, Microsoft bought the rights for QDOS (Quick and Dirty Operating System) from Seattle Computer Products (SCP) for $25,000. QDOS, otherwise known as 86-DOS, was designed by SCP to run on the Intel 8086 processor, and was originally thrown together in just two months for a 0.1 release in 1980.

Microsoft and SUSE extend Microsoft's controversial Novell Linux pact

Filed under
Microsoft
SUSE

zdnet.com: Microsoft and SUSE announced they are extending the 2006 Microsoft-Novell Linux patent-protection agreement, and that Microsoft is buying $100 million worth of SUSE Linux Enterprise certificates for its customers.

Is Microsoft Linux's New BFF?

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

linuxinsider.com (blog safari): "M$ hates Free Software of any kind," asserted blogger Robert Pogson. "They have attacked Linux, the GPL, copyleft, etc. -- stuff that would be of no interest to them at all except their customers see the advantages of Free Software."

No apologies for Microsoft Windows

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Mac

zdnet.co.uk: Recently I've had some discussion with colleagues about Mac OS X, Windows, and Linux in comparison to each other. Generally, I've found that most people agree that Mac OS X [and Linux] is more stable than Windows. But after that being said, they come back with an apology for Microsoft.

Linux receives 20th birthday video from Microsoft

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

digitizor.com: The Linux Foundation is celebrating 20 years of Linux and as a part of the celebration, they are accepting videos as part of a video contest. One of the video submission came form none other than Microsoft itself.

Watching our backs, and paging Dr. Godwin

Filed under
Microsoft

larrythefreesoftwareguy.wordpress: Is it time to start trusting Microsoft? The answer is clearly, “No. Absolutely not.” We should not trust Microsoft as far as Steve Ballmer can throw a chair.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: Software

Linux and FOSS Events

  • Debian SunCamp 2017 Is Taking Place May 18-21 in the Province of Girona, Spain
    It looks like last year's Debian SunCamp event for Debian developers was a total success and Martín Ferrari is back with a new proposal that should take place later this spring during four days full of hacking, socializing, and fun. That's right, we're talking about Debian SunCamp 2017, an event any Debian developer, contributor, or user can attend to meet his or hers Debian buddies, hack together on new projects or improve existing ones by sharing their knowledge, plan upcoming features and discuss ideas for the Debian GNU/Linux operating system.
  • Pieter Hintjens In Memoriam
    Pieter Hintjens was a writer, programmer and thinker who has spent decades building large software systems and on-line communities, which he describes as "Living Systems". He was an expert in distributed computing, having written over 30 protocols and distributed software systems. He designed AMQP in 2004, and founded the ZeroMQ free software project in 2007. He was the author of the O'Reilly ZeroMQ book, "Culture and Empire", "The Psychopath Code", "Social Architecture", and "Confessions of a Necromancer". He was the president of the Foundation for a Free Information Infrastructure (FFII), and fought the software patent directive and the standardisation of the Microsoft OOXML Office format. He also organized the Internet of Things (IOT) Devroom here at FOSDEM for the last 3 years. In April 2016 he was diagnosed with terminal metastasis of a previous cancer.
  • foss-gbg on Wednesday
    The topics are Yocto Linux on FPGA-based hardware, risk and license management in open source projects and a product release by the local start-up Zifra (an encryptable SD-card). More information and free tickets are available at the foss-gbg site.

Leftovers: OSS

  • When Open Source Meets the Enterprise
    Open source solutions have long been an option for the enterprise, but lately it seems they are becoming more of a necessity for advanced data operations than merely a luxury for IT techs who like to play with code. While it’s true that open platforms tend to provide a broader feature set compared to their proprietary brethren, due to their larger and more diverse development communities, this often comes at the cost of increased operational complexity. At a time when most enterprises are looking to shed their responsibilities for infrastructure and architecture to focus instead on core money-making services, open source requires a fairly high level of in-house technical skill. But as data environments become more distributed and reliant upon increasingly complex compilations of third-party systems, open source can provide at least a base layer of commonality for resources that support a given distribution.
  • EngineerBetter CTO: the logical truth about software 'packaging'
    Technologies such as Docker have blended these responsibilities, causing developers to need to care about what operating system and native libraries are available to their applications – after years of the industry striving for more abstraction and increased decoupling!
  • What will we do when everything is automated?
    Just translate the term "productivity of American factories" into the word "automation" and you get the picture. Other workers are not taking jobs away from the gainfully employed, machines are. This is not a new trend. It's been going on since before Eli Whitney invented the cotton gin. Industry creates machines that do the work of humans faster, cheaper, with more accuracy and with less failure. That's the nature of industry—nothing new here. However, what is new is the rate by which the displacement of human beings from the workforce in happening.
  • Want OpenStack benefits? Put your private cloud plan in place first
    The open source software promises hard-to-come-by cloud standards and no vendor lock-in, says Forrester's Lauren Nelson. But there's more to consider -- including containers.
  • Set the Agenda at OpenStack Summit Boston
    The next OpenStack Summit is just three months away now, and as is their custom, the organizers have once again invited you–the OpenStack Community–to vote on which presentations will and will not be featured at the event.
  • What’s new in the world of OpenStack Ambassadors
    Ambassadors act as liaisons between multiple User Groups, the Foundation and the community in their regions. Launched in 2013, the OpenStack Ambassador program aims to create a framework of community leaders to sustainably expand the reach of OpenStack around the world.
  • Boston summit preview, Ambassador program updates, and more OpenStack news