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Microsoft

Foundation exec slams Microsoft for 'meaningless' security pledge

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Microsoft

The Free Software Foundation on Thursday attacked Microsoft for "meaningless" public statements on privacy and security, claiming that Windows is "fundamentally insecure."

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UK citizen sues Microsoft over Prism private data leak to NSA

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Microsoft

Apple and Microsoft Claim Patent Tax on GNU/Linux, Red Hat’s Response Too Weak

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Linux
Microsoft

If this is true at all (and evidence is still absent), then this is extortion and we need to bring it to light in order for legal procedures to follow. Some company needs to leak out information, potentially breaking an NDA. That’s how Edward Snowden helped hold the NSA and GCHQ accountable.

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Anti-GNU/Linux Campaigns Are Not Left Behind at Microsoft, Only the Brands Change

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Linux
Google
Microsoft

Microsoft’s offensive and facts-free campaigns still target products which run GNU/Linux, even if the “G” and “L” words are not mentioned (Chromebooks/Google are the target now)

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Big trolls vs. small trolls: The real battle behind patent reform

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Microsoft

The dirty secret IBM, Microsoft, and other self-proclaimed advocates of patent reform don't want you to know is that they are trolls, too. They have large and highly profitable business units using exactly the same tactics as the patent trolls they hate. The reason they hate the trolls is not because of what they do -- after all, IBM and Microsoft were the pioneers of treating patent portfolios as profit centers rather than cost centers. No, the reason they hate the trolls is because the trolls attack them with the weapons they themselves perfected.

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Also from Phipps (OSI President): 4 ways open source protects you against software patents

K. Y. Srinivasan: From Serving Microsoft’s Agenda Inside Novell to Helping Microsoft Infiltrate and Control Linux

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Microsoft

So in other words, it is about taxing and controlling (and spying on) GNU/Linux by making Microsoft its seller. It is also about running GNU/Linux merely as a guest on Windows hosts, using proprietary software of course.

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Winamp Petition Emerges as Microsoft Considers Purchase

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Microsoft

As previously reported, AOL plans to shut down Winamp after serving music lovers for around 16 years. The company didn’t state why the long-time service and app will be discontinued, only reporting that Winamp will no longer be available past December 20, 2013. We can’t even use it through the holidays.

Now there’s a petition to keep Winamp alive by making the client open source. "Winamp is the best media player ever built. If there were other alternatives that would be fine. But there is nothing that can do what Winamp can do. It is the most versatile media player on earth," the petition reads.

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Google to sell anti-Microsoft mugs

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Microsoft

Google has started an anti-Microsoft campaign called ‘MicroShaft’ to convince users to avoid Microsoft products – which (despite being insanely expensive) have backdoors to give security agencies easy access to user’s data.

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Microsoft's Intense Lobbying Works: Goodlatte To Drop Plan To Allow For Faster Review Of Bad Software Patents

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Microsoft

Last week, we wrote about Microsoft's intense, and somewhat dishonest, lobbying to try to remove one aspect of proposed patent reform: the covered business methods program, which would have allowed approved technology patents to get reviewed by the Patent Office much more quickly. It was based on Senator Chuck Schumer's plan, which enabled the same feature for patents related to financial services. Many have seen that Schumer's effort was somewhat successful in stopping bad financial services patents, and so it makes sense to do the same thing for software as well. In fact, it makes more sense, since so many patent lawsuits and patent troll shakedowns involve software-related patents.

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More in Tux Machines

KDevelop 5.2.1 released

Just a few days after the release of KDevelop 5.2.0, we today provide a stabilization and bugfix release with version 5.2.1. This is a bugfix-only release, which introduces no new features and as such is a safe and recommended update for everyone currently using KDevelop 5.2.0. You can find the updated Windows 32- and 64 bit installers, the Linux AppImage, as well as the source code archives on our download page. Read more

Rugged, octa-core hacker board has 2GB RAM

FriendlyElec’s $75 “NanoPC-T3 Plus” SBC runs Linux or Android on an octa-core -A53 Samsung SoC, and features 2GB DDR3, 16GB eMMC, and -40 to 80℃ support. FriendlyElec announced the original NanoPC-T3 SBC in April 2016, back when the company still called itself FriendlyARM. The community backed board, which was a processor and RAM upgrade to the NanoPC-T2, has now been further enhanced with a new NanoPC-T3 Plus model. Read more

Android Leftovers

Security: Firefox "Breach Alerts", Uber Crack, and Intel Back Doors

  • Firefox “Breach Alerts” Will Warn If You Visit A ‘Hacked’ Website
    One more thing is coming to add to the capabilities of the recently released Firefox 57 aka Firefox Quantum. Mozilla is working on a new feature for Firefox, dubbed Breach Alerts, which will warn users when they visit a website, whether it was hacked in the past or not.
  • GCHQ: change your passwords now even if Uber says it contained the breach
    Uber claims to have paid $100,000 to secure 57 million accounts exposed in a breach last year, but the UK's spy agency, GCHQ, suggests consumers don't place too much faith in Uber’s claim. The GCHQ's National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) on Thursday published guidance for Uber users, reminding those affected by the firm’s just revealed 2016 breach they should take precautionary action even if their personal details may not have been compromised. The agency warned that Uber drivers and riders should “immediately change passwords” that were used for Uber.
  • Drive-By Phishing Scams Race Toward Uber Users
    Indeed, hardly any time elapsed after Uber came clean Tuesday about the year-old breach it had concealed before crack teams of social engineers unleashed appropriately themed phishing messages designed to bamboozle the masses (see Fast and Furious Data Breach Scandal Overtakes Uber).
  • EU authorities consider creating data breach justice league to tackle uber hack
    Multiple investigations prompted by Uber's admission that it concealed a hack could join together for one big mega-probe into the incident. An EU working group which has responsibility for data protection will decide next week whether to co-ordinate different investigations taking place in the UK, Italy, Austria, Poland and the Netherlands.
  • Intel Didn't Heed Security Experts Warnings About ME [Ed: Intel refused to speak about back doors until it became too mainstream a topic, then pretended it's a "bug"]
    For nearly eight years, the chip maker has been turning a deaf ear on security warnings about the wisdom of Intel Management Engine.