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Microsoft

Defense Contractor Heeds Microsoft's Patent War Cry

Filed under
Microsoft
Legal

linuxinsider.com: Defense contractor General Dynamics Itronix has agreed to pay Microsoft licensing fees in order to avoid possible trouble over the contractor's use of Android in some of its products.

Linux vs. Windows: Should Your Office Make the Switch?

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

bnet.com: Admit it: You’ve always wondered about Linux — that “other” operating system. Is it really comparable to Windows? Could you run your business on it? Would switching save you money?

A no-OS-computer? You must be a pirate!

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

mandrivachronicles.blogspot: After reading this piece about a Linux keyboard PC , I got excited. I checked the vendor's page and, sure enough, there was a "NO OS" option. A day later, I received it and, with it, there came a surprise. They had included Windows 7 Professional 32 bits and were charging me for it!

Why Can’t Free, Open Source Linux Beat Windows?

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

geekwithlaptop.com: There are no major differences between Linux and Windows in terms of functionality. Linux can perform 99% of the tasks Windows is capable to carry out, but why is Windows more popular than Linux?

Windows' Endgame. Desktop Linux's Failure

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

zdnet.com: After almost 20-years of ruling the computing world, Windows is on its way down. Linux will not be the winner though.

Microsoft forced to withdraw XML-related patent application

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Microsoft

itwire.com: Persistent opposition by the New Zealand Open Source Society to an XML-related patent application filed by Microsoft in the country has resulted in the software giant withdrawing the same.

Weekend ruined

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Mac

macworld.com: When the weekend comes, Macalope likes to put his hooves up and enjoy some alfalfa and a grain-based beverage. Is that too much to ask? Apparently it is, according to PCWorld’s Katherine Noyes. Why else would she have so thoughtlessly decided to write this insipid piece—”Post-MacDefender, Linux Looks Better Than Ever“—about Mac and Linux security?

Windows Update Annoyances Strike Again

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Microsoft

dasublogbyprashanth.blogspot: Although Linux Mint is my primary OS, I still have Microsoft Windows 7 around because I play a couple games from time to time. However, because I don't do that so frequently, whenever I do boot Microsoft Windows 7, I get bombarded with updates.

Counter-Rant

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

mrpogson.com: I usually rant about that other OS messing up or GNU/Linux making great strides. Today I am going to do a counter-rant. Batsov has a rant up about how miserable GNU/Linux on the desktop has made him so he is “going back” to that other OS after 8 years. I find a wholesale defect in his reasoning.

What Goes Around Comes Around

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

mrpogson.com: One of the gripes that Linux-haters trumpet is that one needs to use typed commands and text files to do some things on the system. Well, M$ has done such a fine job of convincing IT people that a GUI is the way to go that folks in small businesses are having a devil of a time putting their thousands of e-mail addresses into M$’s cloud solution.

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University fuels NextCloud's improved monitoring

Encouraged by a potential customer - a large, German university - the German start-up company NextCloud has improved the resource monitoring capabilities of its eponymous cloud services solution, which it makes available as open source software. The improved monitoring should help users scale their implementation, decide how to balance work loads and alerting them to potential capacity issues. NextCloud’s monitoring capabilities can easily be combined with OpenNMS, an open source network monitoring and management solution. Read more

Linux Kernel Developers on 25 Years of Linux

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Car manufacturers cooperate to build the car of the future

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Torvalds at LinuxCon: The Highlights and the Lowlights

On Wednesday, when Linus Torvalds was interviewed as the opening keynote of the day at LinuxCon 2016, Linux was a day short of its 25th birthday. Interviewer Dirk Hohndel of VMware pointed out that in the famous announcement of the operating system posted by Torvalds 25 years earlier, he had said that the OS “wasn’t portable,” yet today it supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. Torvalds also wrote, “it probably never will support anything other than AT-harddisks.” Read more