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Microsoft

Accenture, Microsoft Proxy

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Row over 'very limited' Linux PCs escalates in Munich [Ed: Microsoft and Accenture working together to undermine GNU/Linux and 'make an example' or send out a warning]

    With the controversy now escalating into a very public debate, it's currently unknown which operating system Munich will be using for the next decade. Linux is currently deployed on 20,000 computers across the city. Converting them all back to Windows will take months of further work.

    While it's attracted the most attention, Munich isn't the only city to have shunned Windows in favour of open-source software. Last September, Moscow abandoned Microsoft's Outlook email program in favour of its own system. Concerns about the use of proprietary software in government departments have also been raised across the world, including in the UK where a long-running but slowly progressing campaign is encouraging Linux usage

  • Accenture and Docker Team on Container Services

    Accenture has expanded its relationship with Docker to enhance its existing multicloud Container as a Service solutions. The company will leverage Docker Datacenter to provide enterprises with the capabilities needed to secure the software supply chain, expand workload portability, and improve application resilience.

Kernel and Drivers

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
  • Kernel 4.10 gives Linux support for AMD Ryzen multithreading

    With the release of its Ryzen 7 series CPUs, AMD came out swinging at Intel’s high-end Core i7 line. As I noted in a previous column, version 4.10 of the Linux kernel corrects an issue that kept Intel CPUs from reaching their turbo speeds, but there’s also something in the new kernel for Team Red.

  • Linus Torvalds explains how to Pull without jerking his chain

    Linux kernel developers have again given Linus Torvalds cause for complaint.

    The Linux Lord felt the need to take to the Linux Kernel Mailing List late last week to tell a chap called Wolfram Sang that “If you cannot explain a reason for a merge or be bothered to try to write a commit message, you shouldn't be doing that merge. It really is that simple.”

  • Microsoft admits mistake, pulls problematic Windows 10 driver

    The driver, listed as "Microsoft -- WPD -- 2/22/2016 12:00:00 AM -- 5.2.5326.4762," wasn’t accompanied by any details, although we knew from the name that it related to Windows Portable Devices and affected users who had phones and tablets connected to the OS.

    While the driver was an optional update for Windows 7 and 8.1 users, it was installed automatically for those on Windows 10.

Munich Strikes Back at Microsoft's Dirty Tricks and Lobbying

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • There's a Munich disagreement over Open source

    Moves by German politicians to undo Munich’s decade experiment in open source are unnecessary, according to the bloke in charge of the project.

    There are moves to replace the Linux based systems at Munich after a decade of it being the poster-child for open sauce operating systems. Munich's ruling SPD-CSU coalition is apparently a fan of phasing out the use of open-source software.

    Last month, the general council backed a proposal that the administration should investigate how long it will take and how much it will cost to build a Windows 10 client. Once it has that information the council will vote to replace LiMux the custom version of Ubuntu which the council has been developing.

  • Munich IT chief slams city's decision to dump Linux for Windows

    THE HEAD OF IT at the City of Munich's IT services provider [email protected], Karl-Heinz Schneider, has claimed that there are no "compelling technical reasons" for the authority to order a migration back to Windows.

    Last month, Munich voted to investigate the viability of creating a Windows 10 client, thus ending its multi-million euro, nine-year experiment in running the municipality on Linux.

    Schneider, who heads up the company responsible for Munich's desktop Linux implementation, has spoken out about the move during an interview with German IT publication Heise.de.

  • Munich's desktop Linux was 'working fine' before politicians decreed return to Windows

    Speaking to German IT publication Heise.de, Schneider claimed that he was surprised by the move, adding that any compatibility problems that the City had initially encountered had been fixed.

Microsoft and Openwashing, 'Success' Stories

Filed under
Microsoft
  • OCP Launches Marketplace for Open Source Data Center Hardware
  • Microsoft embraces open source innovation for data centres at OCP 2017 [Ed: This has nothing to do with "open source"; pure openwashing from Microsoft]
  • Microsoft: Users Locked Out of Accounts Tuesday

    Microsoft Corp. (MSFT) was hit with an outage early Tuesday morning that prevented users from accessing a host of applications and services including Xbox, Skype and Outlook. Many Microsoft customers in Western Europe and the Eastern U.S. were greeted with a message that their account wasn’t active when they tried to log on.

    Users complaining at website DownDector.com about Outlook.com reached in the thousands, reported Reuters. Meanwhile the hashtag #hotmail was trending on Twitter in the U.K. Microsoft confirmed the problem, saying in an Xbox Live message it was working to resolve the issues as quickly as possible. Microsoft Account Services, which also includes Office 365, the Windows Store and a host of other apps came back up around 9:30 a.m. EST Tuesday at which time Microsoft alerted users.

  • Microsoft is putting OneDrive ads in Windows 10’s File Explorer

    Microsoft has made a bad habit of introducing ads here and there throughout Windows, and now people are starting to notice them showing up in another spot: inside File Explorer.

    People have reported seeing notifications to sign up for OneDrive — Microsoft’s cloud storage service — at the top of the Quick Access screen that comes up when you open a new File Explorer window.

Linux in Munich: 'No compelling technical reason to return to Windows,' says city's IT chief

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

The man who runs Munich's central IT says there is no practical reason for the city to write off millions of euros and years of work to ditch its Linux-based OS for Windows.

The city authority is widely expected to swap Linux for Windows, due to a desire to drop open-source software at the council among Munich's ruling SPD-CSU coalition.

Last month, the general council backed a proposal that the administration should investigate how long it will take and how much it will cost to build a Windows 10 client. Once the details are known, the council will vote on whether Windows should replace LiMux, a custom version of the Ubuntu OS that is used by more than 15,000 staff across the council. The changeover would take place by 2021.

But now the man in charge of Munich's central IT provider, IT@M, has said there is no technical reason to switch back to Windows, describing the decision to prepare to return as being in some ways "surprising".

Read more

Proprietary Software Traps

Filed under
Microsoft
Software
  • Using proprietary services to develop open source software [Ed: never a good idea. Microsoft attempts to lock in FOSS developers this way.]

    It is now pretty well accepted that open source is a superior way of producing software. Almost everyone is doing open source these days. In particular, the ability for users to look under the hood and make changes results in tools that are better adapted to their workflows. It reduces the cost and risk of finding yourself locked in with a vendor in an unbalanced relationship. It contributes to a virtuous circle of continuous improvement, blurring the lines between consumers and producers. It enables everyone to remix and invent new things. It adds up to the common human knowledge.

  • Why doesn't Microsoft just give up on Skype for Linux? [Ed: because Microsoft wants to spy on (record) everyone?]

    Microsoft released a beta client of Skype for Linux last week but even basic problems with the alpha client — which was around much longer than an alpha client should be — still appear to be dogging the software.

    Every time a new release takes place, I give it a twirl to see what, if anything, has changed.

  • What's new in the Skype for Linux beta
  • Skype Lite Gets Brings Kannada Language Support, Skype for Linux Moves to Beta
  • Spotify on Fedora 25 using Flatpak

    Spotify is a great application where the web version just isn't as useful as the Desktop app. Spotify has a debian installer and no support for rpm distros, typically we'd be SOL on Fedora. But with flatpak it's easy to install Spotify on platforms like Fedora, CentOS, Ubuntu, etc without deb or rpm!

Microsoft Versus GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Europe-wide interest in Munich desktop debate

    In the days leading up to the vote, the city received a record-breaking number of comments, one city councillor noted. A handful of activists attended the city hall meeting, and an alliance of German and international free and open source organisations questioned the city's plans in an open letter.

    In a statement, the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) says that the door is still open, “although the mandate is highly suggestive, in that it suggests that the existing vendor-neutral approach is to be replaced with a proprietary solution.” The advocacy group says it will continue to campaign: “The vendor-neutral strategy must prevail.”

  • Microsoft open source efforts draw praise [Ed: This article is a lie, based on selective quotes. Microsoft is attacking FOSS using patents and recall what happens in Munich.]

What Microsoft Did in Munich

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • What happened in Munich [iophk: "Microsoft fifth columnists inside .de government"]

    What lead to this public hearing on 15 February? In 2014, Dieter Reiter was elected new mayor of Munich. He had referred to himself as "Microsoft fan" even before he took office. He prides himself with having played a major part in the decision to move the Microsoft Germany headquarters to downtown Munich. He started to question the LiMux strategy as soon as his term started, and asked Accenture, a Microsoft partner in the same building as Microsoft, to analyse Munich's IT infrastructure. The report can be found here (German). It's noteworthy that in their report, the analysts identify primarily organisational issues at the root of the problems troubling LiMux uptake, rather than technical challenges.

  • FSFE: What happened in Munich [Ed: Microsoft played dirty]

    On 15 February 2017, the city council of Munich, Germany convened to discuss the future of their LiMux project. In its public session, the plenary voted to have the city administration develop a strategy to unify client-side IT architecture, building atop a yet-to-be-developed "Windows-Basis-Client". A translation of the complete decision is included further down.

    The opposing parties were overruled, but the decision was amended such that the strategy document must specify which LiMux-applications will no longer be needed, the extent in which prior investments must be written off, and a rough calculation of the overall costs of the desired unification.

    Since this decision was reached, the majority of media have reported that a final call was made to halt LiMux and switch back to Microsoft software. This is, however, not an accurate representation of the outcome of the city council meeting. We studied the available documentation and our impression is that the last word has not been spoken.

The Year Of Linux On Everything But The Desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

The War on Linux goes back to Bill Gates, then CEO of Microsoft, in an “open letter to hobbyists” published in a newsletter in 1976. Even though Linux wouldn’t be born until 1991, Gates’ burgeoning software company – itself years away from releasing its first operating system – already felt the threat of open source software. We know Gates today as a kindly billionaire who’s joining us in the fight against everything from disease to income inequality, but there was a time when Gates was the bad guy of the computing world.

Microsoft released its Windows operating system in 1985. At the time, its main competition was Apple and Unix-like systems. BSD was the dominant open source Unix clone then – it marks its 40th birthday this year, in fact – and Microsoft fired barrages of legal challenges to BSD just like it eventually would against Linux. Meanwhile Apple sued Microsoft over its interface, in the infamous “Look and Feel” lawsuit, and Microsoft’s reign would forever be challenged. Eventually Microsoft would be tried in both the US and the UK for antitrust, which is a government regulation against corporate monopolies. Even though it lost both suits, Microsoft simply paid the fine out of its bottomless pockets and kept right at it.

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Munich to Assess Cost of Vista 10 (Spyware). But Not Leaving GNU/Linux Yet

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Linux's Munich crisis: Crunch vote locks city on course for Windows return

    However, Matthias Kirschner, president of the Free Software Foundation Europe said: "They have now stepped back a little bit because so many people were watching, but on the other hand it's very clear what they want."

  • Why Munich made the switch from Windows to Linux—and may be reversing course
  • The Document Foundation: Munich Returning to Windows and Office a Step Backwards

    The City of Munich, which has long been considered a pioneer of the transition from Windows to Linux, is now exploring ways to return to Microsoft’s solutions, with a proposal to move all computers to Windows 10 and Microsoft Office to be discussed today.

  • Linux Pioneer Munich Makes Huge Step Towards Returning to Windows [Ed: Microsoft's propagandist Bogdan Popa still lobbying against GNU/Linux in Munich]

    The City of Munich will explore ways to move to Windows 10 by 2020, as part of a historic vote that could represent a major step towards the demise of its own Linux-based LiMux.

  • Munich City Government to Dump Linux Desktop [Ed: This headline is a lie, it's anything but confirmed]
  • Microsoft does not love Linux in Munich

    The city of Munich, which moved its systems to Linux many years ago, is now thinking of moving back to Windows 10, following the arrival of a mayor who got Microsoft to move its German corporate headquarters to Munich.

    The city council voted on Wednesday to create a draft plan outlining the costs involved in moving back to Windows. If the plan gets the green light, then the return to Windows could take place by the end of 2020.

  • Linux champion Munich takes decisive step towards returning to Windows

    At the time Munich began the move to LiMux in 2004, it was one of the largest organizations to reject Windows, and Microsoft took the city's leaving so seriously that its then CEO Steve Ballmer flew to Munich, but the mayor at the time, Christian Ude, stood firm.

    More recently, Microsoft last year moved its German company headquarters to Munich, and now, less than four years after the migration of some 15,000 staff to LiMux was completed, the city has taken a decisive step towards swapping the Linux-based OS for Windows—whose use has been reduced to a minimum in the city.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME 3.25.3 Released, GTK Development

  • GNOME 3.25.3 Now Available
    GNOME 3.25.3 is now available as the latest stepping stone towards September's release of GNOME 3.26.
  • GNOME 3.26 Desktop Environment Development Continues, New Milestone Is Out Now
    Matthias Clasen has informed the community via an email announcement that the third milestone of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment is now ready for public testing. After a one day delay, GNOME 3.25.3 is now available, and it's the third development release of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment that could be used by default in popular GNU/Linux distributions, such as the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) or Fedora 27, both due for release later this year. It brings a bunch of updates and new features to several of its components and apps.
  • Eight years since first release and still no usable theme?
    Well, let me be frank. Ever since gtk-3.0 I've been skeptical of it, especially of the theming aspect. In gtk-2 we had (and still have) many themes ranging from trash to excellent, almost every kind of taste could have been satisfied. Not so in gtk-3. First issue is constant changes to theming API, meaning that despite there being hundreds of themes, only handful of them actually work right :( And among them, I still have yet to find one that would work on my fairly usual 15,6″ laptop screen with 1366×768 px resolution. Basicaly I have two issues.

Microsoft Dirty Tricks and Entryism

Security: Windows Causes Chaos, Routers With Back Doors, Patching of UNIX/Linux

  • Traffic lights in Australia hit by WannaCry ransomware [Ed: Well, who uses Microsoft Windows to manage traffic?!?!]

    Radio station 3aw reports that dozens of pole based traffic calming measures are infected and that this came as a surprise to the local minister and Road Safety Camera Commissioner when radio reporters told him about it.

  • Honda shuts down factory after finding NSA-derived Wcry in its networks
    The WCry ransomware worm has struck again, this time prompting Honda Company to halt production in one of its Japan-based factories after finding infections in a broad swath of its computer networks, according to media reports. The automaker shut down its Sayama plant northwest of Tokyo on Monday after finding that WCry had affected networks across Japan, North America, Europe, China, and other regions, Reuters reported Wednesday. Discovery of the infection came on Sunday, more than five weeks after the onset of the NSA-derived ransomware worm, which struck an estimated 727,000 computers in 90 countries. The mass outbreak was quickly contained through a major stroke of good luck. A security researcher largely acting out of curiosity registered a mysterious domain name contained in the WCry code that acted as a global kill switch that immediately halted the self-replicating attack.
  • GhostHook: CyberArk finds new way to attack Windows 10

    Researchers at CyberArk Labs have discovered a new way of gaining access to the innards of Windows 10 64-bit systems that can bypass existing safeguards, including the kernel patch protection known as PatchGuard that Microsoft developed to improve system security.

  • John McAfee claims 'every router in America has been compromised' by hackers and spies

    Technology pioneer John McAfee believes that every home internet router in America is wide open to cyberattacks by criminal hackers and intelligence agencies. He makes the claim speaking after revelations from WikiLeaks that the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) targets the devices.

  • 'Stack Clash' Smashed Security Fix in Linux
    What's old is new again: an exploit protection mechanism for a known flaw in the Linux kernel has fallen to a new attack targeting an old problem.
  • Continuous defence against open source exploits
    Register for next month's expo for the public sector DevOps community to hear key speakers from the front line of public sector digital transformation and see the latest technologies at first hand. Andrew Martin, DevOps lead in a major government department, has been added to the line-up of speakers to talk about the importance of getting the approach to security right with open source software.
  • IoT goes nuclear: creating a ZigBee chain reaction [iophk: "use 6lowpan instead"]

    If plugging in an infected bulb is too much hassle, the authors also demonstrate how to take over bulbs by war-driving around in a car, or by war-flying a drone.

  • Passengers given a freight as IT glitch knocks out rail ticket machines

    The network of machines are operated by the individual franchises, but share a common infrastructure from German software company Scheidt and Bachmann.

OpenBSD Development News

  • OpenBSD now has Trapsleds to make life harder for ROPers
  • Historical: My first OpenBSD Hackathon

    I was a nobody. With some encouragement, enough liquid courage to override my imposter syndrome, and a few hours of mentoring, I'm now doing big projects. The next time you're sitting at a table with someone new to your field, ask yourself: how can you encourage them? You just might make the world better.

    Thank you Dale. And thank you Theo.

  • Finish the link-kit job
    We've had the linkkit components in the tree for a while, but it has taken nearly 20 rounds between rpe/tb/myself to get the last few bits finished. So that the link kit is cleanly used at reboot, but also fits in with the practices kernel developers follow.