Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Microsoft

Microsoft EEE

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Why the Windows Subsystem for Linux Matters to You – Even if You Don’t Use it [Ed: Microsoft pulling an EEE on GNU/Linux matters. Sure it does... while suing GNU/Linux with software patents Microsoft says it "loves Linux".]
  • Canonical Teams Up with Microsoft to Enable New Azure Tailored Ubuntu Kernel

    In a joint collaboration with Microsoft's Azure team, Canonical managed to enable a new Azure tailored Ubuntu kernel in the Ubuntu Cloud Images for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS on Azure starting today, September 21, 2017.

    The Azure tailored Ubuntu kernel is now enabled by default for the Ubuntu Cloud images running the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system on Microsoft's Azure cloud computing platform, and Canonical vows to offer the same level of support as the rest of its Ubuntu kernels until the operating system reaches end of life.

5 fundamental differences between Windows 10 and Linux

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

This comparison really only scratches the surface. And don't get me wrong, there are areas where Windows 10 bests Linux (few, but they do exist). In the end, however, the choice is yours. Chances are you'll be making the choice based on which platform will allow you get more work done and do so with a certain level of efficiency and reliability. I would highly recommend, to anyone, if Linux can enable you to get your work done...give it a go and see if you don't find it more dependable and predictable.

Read more

"Oligarchis[ing] open-source communities," Openwashing, and Microsoft EEE

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Microsoft EEE and Openwashing: the Latest

Filed under
Microsoft

Openwashing and Fakes

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Ditching Apple and Microsoft for GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Mac
  • Switching to xmonad + Gnome – and ditching a Mac

    I have been using XFCE with xmonad for years now. I’m not sure exactly how many, but at least 6 years, if not closer to 10. Today I threw in the towel and switched to Gnome.

    More recently, at a new job, I was given a Macbook Pro. I wasn’t entirely sure what to think of this, but I thought I’d give it a try. I found MacOS to be extremely frustrating and confining. It had no real support for a tiling window manager, and although projects like amethyst tried to approximate what xmonad can do on Linux, they were just too limited by the platform and were clunky. Moreover, the entire UI was surprisingly sluggish; maybe that was an induced effect from animations, but I don’t think that explains it. A Debisn stretch install, even on inferior hardware, was snappy in a way that MacOS never was. So I have requested to swap for a laptop that will run Debian. The strange use of Command instead of Control for things, combined with the overall lack of configurability of keybindings, meant that I was going to always be fighting muscle memory moving from one platform to another. Not only that, but being back in the world of a Free Software OS means a lot.

  • Google is trying to poach Microsoft Azure partners by sending them free Chromebooks
  • Google’s Cloud Team Is Sending Chromebooks To Microsoft Partners

     

    Microsoft has its Azure platform, Amazon has AWS, Google is entering the arena with Google Cloud and each company is throwing serious money to grab a slice of this market as it continues to expand.

  • Windows loses the market share growth battle against Linux [Ed: Almost no site (that I've stumbled upon) mentions that the firm behind these numbers is Microsoft-connected. Microsoft sites like this one say Windows "market share collapsed from 90.45% to 88.77%." But no, it's more like 50%. ChromeOS, Android etc. are conveniently unaccounted for.]

    In August, Windows dropped to a 90.70% market share from 91.45% from July, despite Microsoft’s effort. This drop of 0.75% is the biggest one that the operating system had recorded since April 2016. Back then, the OS’s market share collapsed from 90.45% to 88.77%.

Linux Foundation Puff Pieces and Openwashing

Filed under
Microsoft

Rise of GNU/Linux at Windows' Expense

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Linux adoption on the rise as Windows market share collapsed once again [Ed: What's significant here: 1. this is a Microsoft propaganda site 2. citing a Microsoft-connected firm 3. claiming Windows "collapse"]

    Despite Microsoft’s Windows 10 is better than its predecessor, Windows market share has witnessed yet another collapse, while Linux adoption is on a rise. A new data published by NetMarketShare reveals that Microsoft’s Windows market share declined to 90.70 percent from 91.45 percent.

  • Linux Doubles Its Market Share Since 2015, Windows And Mac Adoption Slows Down

    The FOSS and Linux community tosses up this idea at the beginning of a new year and expects the Linux adoption to rise exponentially in the upcoming months. While a complete Linux dominance in the desktop scene looks like a far-fetched dream, Tux continues to make slow strides.

    According to the latest data from NetMarketShare, Linux is running on 3.37% desktop computers and laptops. This Linux market share number is from August 2017.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

NuTyX 10.1-rc1 Available

I'm very please to propose you the first release candidate version of the next version 10.1 stable version of NuTyX As they have been so many security issues, I took the chance to recompile all the collections (1701 packages) for this coming next stable NuTyX version. Read more

Android Leftovers

Events: FOSDEM Samba Talks, USENIX Enigma, LCA (linux.conf.au) and FAST18

  • Authentication and authorization in Samba 4
    Volker Lendecke is one of the first contributors to Samba, having submitted his first patches in 1994. In addition to developing other important file-sharing tools, he's heavily involved in development of the winbind service, which is implemented in winbindd. Although the core Active Directory (AD) domain controller (DC) code was written by his colleague Stefan Metzmacher, winbind is a crucial component of Samba's AD functionality. In his information-packed talk at FOSDEM 2018, Lendecke said he aimed to give a high-level overview of what AD and Samba authentication is, and in particular the communication pathways and trust relationships between the parts of Samba that authenticate a Samba user in an AD environment.
  • Two FOSDEM talks on Samba 4
    Much as some of us would love never to have to deal with Windows, it exists. It wants to authenticate its users and share resources like files and printers over the network. Although many enterprises use Microsoft tools to do this, there is a free alternative, in the form of Samba. While Samba 3 has been happily providing authentication along with file and print sharing to Windows clients for many years, the Microsoft world has been slowly moving toward Active Directory (AD). Meanwhile, Samba 4, which adds a free reimplementation of AD on Linux, has been increasingly ready for deployment. Three short talks at FOSDEM 2018 provided three different views of Samba 4, also known as Samba-AD, and left behind a pretty clear picture that Samba 4 is truly ready for use. I will cover the first two talks in this article, and the third in a later one.
  • A report from the Enigma conference
    The 2018 USENIX Enigma conference was held for the third time in January. Among many interesting talks, three presentations dealing with human security behaviors stood out. This article covers the key messages of these talks, namely the finding that humans are social in their security behaviors: their decision to adopt a good security practice is hardly ever an isolated decision. Security conferences tend to be dominated by security researchers demonstrating their latest exploits. The talks are attack-oriented, they keep a narrow focus, and usually they close with a dark outlook. The security industry has been doing security conferences like this for twenty years and seems to prefer this format. Yet, if you are tired of this style, the annual USENIX Enigma conference is a welcome change of pace. Most of the talks are defense-oriented, they have a horizon going far beyond technology alone, and they are generally focused on successful solutions.
  • DIY biology
    A scientist with a rather unusual name, Meow-Ludo Meow-Meow, gave a talk at linux.conf.au 2018 about the current trends in "do it yourself" (DIY) biology or "biohacking". He is perhaps most famous for being prosecuted for implanting an Opal card RFID chip into his hand; the Opal card is used for public transportation fares in Sydney. He gave more details about his implant as well as describing some other biohacking projects in an engaging presentation. Meow-Meow is a politician with the Australian Science Party, he said by way of introduction; he has run in the last two elections. He founded BioFoundry, which is "Australia's first open-access molecular biology lab"; there are now two such labs in the country. He is also speaks frequently as "an emerging technology evangelist" for biology as well as other topics.
  • Notes from FAST18

    I attended the technical sessions of Usenix's File And Storage Technology conference this week. Below the fold, notes on the papers that caught my attention.

Security: Vista10 and uTorrent Holes Found by Google

  • Google drops new Edge zero-day as Microsoft misses 90-day deadline

    Google originally shared details of the flaw with Microsoft on 17 November 2017, but Microsoft wasn’t able to come up with a patch within Google’s non-negotiable “you have 90 days to do this” period.

  • Google Goes Public with Another Major Windows 10 Bug
    After revealing an Edge browser vulnerability that Microsoft failed to fix, Google is now back with another disclosure, this time aimed at Windows 10 Fall Creators Update (version 1709), but potentially affecting other Windows versions as well. James Forshaw, a security researcher that’s part of Google’s Project Zero program, says the elevation of privilege vulnerability can be exploited because of the way the operating system handles calls to Advanced Local Procedure Call (ALPC). This means a standard user could obtain administrator privileges on a Windows 10 computer, which in the case of an attack, could eventually lead to full control over the impacted system. But as Neowin noted, this is the second bug discovered in the same function, and both of them, labeled as 1427 and 1428, were reported to Microsoft on November 10, 2017. Microsoft said it fixed them with the release of the February 2018 Patch Tuesday updates, yet as it turns out, only issue 1427 was addressed.
  • uTorrent bugs let websites control your computer and steal your downloads

    The vulnerabilities, according to Project Zero, make it possible for any website a user visits to control key functions in both the uTorrent desktop app for Windows and in uTorrent Web, an alternative to desktop BitTorrent apps that uses a web interface and is controlled by a browser. The biggest threat is posed by malicious sites that could exploit the flaw to download malicious code into the Windows startup folder, where it will be automatically run the next time the computer boots up. Any site a user visits can also access downloaded files and browse download histories.

  • BitTorrent Client uTorrent Suffers Security Vulnerability (Updated)

    BitTorrent client uTorrent is suffering from an as yet undisclosed vulnerability. The security flaw was discovered by Google security researcher Tavis Ormandy, who previously said he would reveal a series of "remote code execution flaws" in torrent clients. BitTorrent Inc. has rolled out a 'patch' in the latest Beta release and hopes to fix the stable uTorrent client later this week.