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Microsoft

Peterborough City Council wants to drop 'expensive' Microsoft for open source and collaborative tools

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Peterborough City Council is looking to drop Microsoft and its "expensive" user agreements in favour of other, more open source applications and collaborative tools.
That's what Richard Godfrey, ICT, strategy, infrastructure and programme manager for Peterborough Council, revealed to Computing in a recent interview.

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Microsoft Can’t Sell Laptops or Phones

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Microsoft

To make matters worse, Microsoft finds itself competing in mobile with companies it thought it had eliminated from the market — like Nokia for instance.

Microsoft may have bought the Finnish company’s mobile division back in 2011, but that hasn’t kept the “old” Nokia from keeping a hand in the mobile game, where it had once excelled.

Maybe it’s set to excel again. Earlier this month, MuleSoft reported that Nokia sold 20,000 of its N1 Android tablets in China in only four minutes, exhausting their supply for the promotion. In the overall scheme of things, 20,000 tablets isn’t an awful lot, but 20,000 in four minutes certainly is. Doubtlessly, Nokia has been ramping up production.

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Nope. Munich Never Happened. – Deny, Deny, and Deny Some More

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Businesses can and do run GNU/Linux on their clients, especially if they are thin clients, they use web-applications or a GNU/Linux application will do the jobs businesses need done.

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NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970/980: Windows vs. Ubuntu Linux Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Microsoft
Ubuntu

This comparison is similar to the three-way NVIDIA GeForce graphics card comparison from Monday but just testing the Maxwell-based GeForce GTX 970 and GTX 980 graphics cards while running the latest binary drivers on Windows and Linux. As with the other end-of-2014 Windows vs. Linux benchmarks, Windows 7 Pro x64 with all available system updates was used and on the Linux side was Ubuntu 14.10. The latest NVIDIA Linux driver is the 346.22 driver version while the latest Windows version at the time of testing was the 347.09 driver release.

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“Average” Users

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Users of GNU/Linux don’t even need to read the GPL to be legal and can probably forget about malware and possibly even firewalls in their homes. They can leave that to the router if at all. The average user doesn’t have to install much software at all as most desktop distros include a web browser that people want to use, multimedia software and an office productivity suite like LibreOffice.

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AMD Catalyst Linux OpenGL Driver Now Faster Than Catalyst Windows Driver In Some Tests

Filed under
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Microsoft

Earlier this week I showed benchmarks of AMD's incredible year for their open-source Linux driver and how the open-source Radeon Gallium3D driver moved closer to performance parity with Catalyst. One of the lingering questions though is how does the Catalyst 14.12 Omega Linux driver from December compare to the latest Catalyst Windows driver? Here's some benchmarks looking at the latest open and closed-source drivers on Linux compared to the latest Catalyst Windows release.

It's been a while since last delivering a Windows vs. Linux Catalyst comparison at Phoronix, but found the time to be right for going along with our year-end recaps and performance reviews. Earlier this week I also posted the Intel Windows vs. Linux OpenGL performance comparison. The same Core i7 4790K Haswell system was used with this AMD Linux vs. Windows benchmarking. As shared in that Intel article, Windows 8 was being very unstable on this particular system so for all of the testing I had to revert to running Windows 7 rather than Windows 8.1.

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Lumia 1020 Leak Features 'Ubuntu Linux' On Microsoft Flagship Windows Phone: Windows App Possibilities Increase?

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Ubuntu

While the evidence is a bit difficult to confirm, it can be witnessed through a series of pictures from the source website. To spare our readers the click, the images simply show the Lumia 1020 booted into a full "Ubuntu OS" desktop.

Folks that have used recent "Ubuntu Linux" operating systems will likely recognize the interface. It features a basic gradient wallpaper with tiles for commonly used features and shortcuts on the lefthand side.

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Old FOSS Friend & Foe Represents Sony in Hack

Filed under
Microsoft
Security
Legal

Boies, along with three attorneys representing the States, brought Microsoft to it’s knees — or so it seemed at the time.

On November 5, 1999, Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson found that Windows dominance on the PC made the company a monopoly and that the company had taken illegal actions against Apple, Java, Netscape, Lotus Notes, RealNetworks, Linux, and others in order to maintain that monopoly. He ordered Microsoft broken in two, with one company producing Windows and another handling all other Microsoft software.

As we all know, Judge Jackson’s solution was never implemented.

Although an appeals court upheld the verdict against Redmond, the breakup of the company was overturned and sent back to the lower court for a review by a new judge. Two years later, in September, 2001, under the Bush Administration, the DOJ announced that it was no longer seeking the breakup of Microsoft, and in November reached a settlement which California, Connecticut, Iowa, Florida, Kansas, Minnesota, Utah, Virginia and Massachusetts opposed.

The settlement basically required Microsoft to share its APIs and appoint a three person panel that would have complete access to Microsoft’s systems, records, and source code for five years. The settlement didn’t require Microsoft to change any code or stop the company from tying additional software with Windows. Additionally, the DOJ did not require Microsoft to change any of its code.

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Apple- and Microsoft-backed patent group ends its war on Android

Filed under
OS
Android
Microsoft
Mac
Legal

And just like that, the Rockstar Consortium's lawsuit campaign against Android is over. The patent holding group (backed by Apple, BlackBerry, Ericsson, Microsoft and Sony) has sold all of its commonly held patents to clearinghouse RPX for $900 million, or a fraction of the $4.5 billion the total patent pool was worth a few years ago. Rockstar will accordingly drop the lawsuits that it still had left, including those leveled against HTC, LG and Samsung. Don't worry that RPX will promptly turn around and sue someone else, either. It already has a deal to license those patents for defensive purposes to a group of 30-plus companies, including Google and Cisco, while the Rockstar companies get to keep their licenses.

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Of course USA loses in cyber war - NSA and friends made sure it would happen

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

There is a reason why China and others are trying to move away from Windows to Linux and other alternatives, and it is not to avoid sending its hard earned dollars to Cayman Islands (or whatever tax haven Microsoft is using these days to collect the majority of its income. Smile

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Malware is not only about viruses – companies preinstall it all the time

In 1983, when I started the free software movement, malware was so rare that each case was shocking and scandalous. Now it’s normal. To be sure, I am not talking about viruses. Malware is the name for a program designed to mistreat its users. Viruses typically are malicious, but software products and software preinstalled in products can also be malicious – and often are, when not free/libre. In 1983, the software field had become dominated by proprietary (ie nonfree) programs, and users were forbidden to change or redistribute them. I developed the GNU operating system, which is often called Linux, to escape and end that injustice. But proprietary developers in the 1980s still had some ethical standards: they sincerely tried to make programs serve their users, even while denying users control over how they would be served. Read more

Tessel 2, A $35 Linux Computer That’s Truly Open Source

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openSUSE Tumbleweed Gets Linux Kernel 4.0.3 and GNOME 3.16.2

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Google Chrome 44 Dev Gets Better Page Capture Resolution

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