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A Linux Paradox Needs Explanation: Making Your Linux OS Look like Windows

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

The Linux platform is extremely flexible, and it can be implemented pretty much anywhere, either as a server, a firewall or as an OS for your heating system at home. The same flexibility allows users to customize their operating systems to look like Windows, and that is somewhat of a paradox.

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A Linux user tries out Windows 10

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Long answer: Are you kidding me? I couldn't repartition that drive fast enough and re-install Linux.

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Q4OS Is an Interesting Windows Clone and Linux Distro at the Same Time

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Q4OS is a Linux operating system that implements a desktop environment that is very similar with the older Windows versions. The developer have just released a new update and they are now much closer to a much stable release.

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What is keeping you from switching to Linux?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

I'd like to make time for switching my main system but it is not there yet. What I plan to do is however use Linux on my laptop and get used to it this way. While it will take longer than a radical switch, it is the best I can do right now. Eventually though, I'd like to run all but one system on Linux and not Windows.

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Also: Who’s Using, And Not Using, GNU/Linux Desktops

My latest Microsoft update problem

Filed under
Microsoft

I know that I just posted a fairly long rant about Windows Update last week, and I don't want this to turn into a blog called "Jamie's Mostly 'I Hate Windows' Stuff", so I am going to make this quite short and to the point. But I think it is important to post it, because it looks like I have experienced a problem that might specifically target people who are likely to read a blog such as mine.

First, this problem affects my Lenovo T400 laptop, which I use with a docking station on my desk at home, and which is loaded with Windows 7 Professional 64-bit and a variety of Linux distributions. It is not Windows 8, it is not UEFI boot, and it is not a GPT partitioned disk - it is a 'plain vanilla' (bog standard? could be appropriate for Windows...) Windows 7 MBR system.

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Netscape: the web browser that came back to haunt Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft
Moz/FF

But even when Microsoft engineers built a TCP/IP stack into Windows, the pain continued. Andreessen and his colleagues left university to found Netscape, wrote a new browser from scratch and released it as Netscape Navigator. This spread like wildfire and led Netscape’s founders to speculate (hubristically) that the browser would eventually become the only piece of software that computer users really needed – thereby relegating the operating system to a mere life-support system for the browser.

Now that got Microsoft’s attention. It was an operating-system company, after all. On May 26, 1995 Gates wrote an internal memo (entitled “The Internet Tidal Wave”) which ordered his subordinates to throw all the company’s resources into launching a single-minded attack on the web browser market. Given that Netscape had a 90% share of that market, Gates was effectively declaring war on Netscape. Microsoft hastily built its own browser, named it Internet Explorer (IE), and set out to destroy the upstart by incorporating Explorer into the Windows operating system, so that it was the default browser for every PC sold.

The strategy worked: Microsoft succeeded in exterminating Netscape, but in the process also nearly destroyed itself, because the campaign triggered an antitrust (unfair competition) suit which looked like breaking up the company, only to founder at the last moment. So Microsoft lived to tell the tale, and Internet Explorer became the world’s browser. By 2000, IE had a 95% market share; it was the de facto industry standard, which meant that if you wanted to make a living from software development you had to make sure that your stuff worked in IE. The Explorer franchise was a monopoly on steroids.

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The Ubuntu, Microsoft & SUSE (Bermuda) Triangle

Filed under
Microsoft
SUSE
Ubuntu

So what does the old SUSE/Microsoft deal have to do with Ubuntu and Redmond’s new partnership arrangement? The quick answer: everything and nothing. Or, perhaps more appropriate for this stage of the game: It’s too soon to tell. One thing’s for sure, even if the deal turns out to be benign and never develops into anything as toxic as SUSE/Microsoft has been, this is sure to develop into something of a brouhaha in the FOSS user community. At the very least, this will become a hot topic on the forums.

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The Best Linux Distros for First Time Switchers from Windows and Mac

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Mac

Linux doesn’t have a single look and feel, as there are several operating systems based on Linux; these are called distributions (distro). The jury is out on which is the best Linux distro, but that’s just a technical comparison. The best distro for you is what matters, and when you are switching, that is usually the distro most akin to which OS you are coming from.

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If Windows XP Had a Linux Brother, It Would Be Q4OS

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Q4OS is a Linux distribution built to offer users an experience similar to the one they would get from a Windows system. The devs have been making quite a few improvements and they are rapidly approaching version 1.0.

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More in Tux Machines

Elementary OS: Freya 0.3.1 is Here!

After just a few months, we’re excited to announce a major upgrade for elementary OS Freya! This new version 0.3.1 closes about 200 reports and brings new features, tons of fixes, better hardware support, visual polish, and enhanced translations. We’re very proud to share some elementary OS download stats as well! So far, elementary OS has been downloaded an estimated 5 million times. Of those downloads, we’re seeing that almost 70% are coming from Windows and OS X. So, “Welcome and congratulations!” to the over 3 million new users of an open source operating system! Read more

Announcing dex, an Open Source OpenID Connect Identity Provider from CoreOS

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Samsung rolls out a round, Tizen-based Gear S2 watch

Samsung debuted its gen 2 smartwatch: a round, 11.5mm thick “Gear S2″ device with a 1.2-inch 360×360 pixel AMOLED display. As expected, it runs Tizen. Samsung’s Tizen Linux-based Gear S2 smartwatch, which was recently teased at the Galaxy Note 5 and Edge S6+ launch, features a round watch-faced, up to three days battery life, and a rotating bezel to augment the touchscreen UI. A slightly thicker 3G model with up to two hours of life supports voice calls, according to a report from The Verge. Read more

GNOME 3.17.91 released!

Hi, the second beta release of the GNOME 3.17 development cycle is finally here! With this release we are officially now in "The String Freeze" [1] (that stacks with all the current freezes): - String Freeze: no string changes may be made without confirmation from the l10n team (gnome-i18n ) and notification to both the release team and the GDP (gnome-doc-list ). Read more