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Microsoft

Linux alternatives to Windows XP

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft, sometime ago decided to end support for older versions of Windows such as Windows XP. No more technical support and security updates for these versions in future signalled Microsoft’s intentions to encourage users to migrate to the latest version of Windows. Lets face it, there are several users who are still on Windows XP – especially in the developing parts of the world. While upgrading Windows XP to Windows 10 seems to be the logical step, users who unwilling or unable to pay can migrate to a free operating system based on Linux.

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Rumour that Microsoft considers purchasing Canonical

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Does Microsoft Love Linux As Much As It Hates Oracle SQL Databases?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Given the long wait, the SQL Server 2016 support for Linux servers seems to reflect a business tactic more than any actual love on Microsoft's part for the open source community.

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Microsoft Openwashing

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Microsoft

Wine 1.9.6 Better Detects GPUs Using Mesa Drivers

Filed under
Microsoft
Software

Wine 1.9.6 was released this morning as the latest bi-weekly development release of Wine.

Most prominent to Wine 1.9.6 is now that it better detects graphics cards using the Mesa drivers. There is also more support for Shader Model 5, C++ exception handling improvements, and a total of 32 known bug fixes. Shader Model 5.0 is what's needed by DirectX 11 support.

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Also: Wine 1.9.6 Is Out with Better Video Card Detection, Shader Model 5 Support

5 reasons Microsoft may never give up on Linux patent claims

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Legal

There are many reasons why Microsoft may not join the Open Innovation Network (OIN) anytime soon. First of all, if a company doesn’t want to use patents as a weapon, it won’t, whether or not it joins OIN.

At the same time, joining OIN doesn’t guarantee that a company won't use patents as a weapon. Both Oracle and Google are OIN members and they have locked horns in one of the fieriest battles in the open source world. IBM is one of the founders of OIN and it has also sued companies (like Groupon) over various patents.

So as much as I believe joining OIN sends a positive message, I don’t think that’s _the_ ultimate solution.

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Also: Microsoft's Linux Inquisitor Grand Master is off to Spotify

The one thing Microsoft must do - but won't - to gain open-source trust

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

So, why are people still paying up rather than fighting? Because patent litigation is incredibly expensive. It's cheaper to pay a $5 to $15 per device licensing fee than to pay a small fortune and take even a remote chance of failure in court.

And Microsoft? Come on, back in 2014, Microsoft was already making about $3.4 billion from its Android patents. Samsung alone paid Microsoft a billion bucks to license its Android patents. This is serious money even by Fortune 500 standards.

In its last quarter, between volume licensing and patents, Microsoft accounted for approximately 9 percent of Microsoft's total revenue.

And, that, of course, is why Microsoft is never going to stop charging for its Android patents. So long as the boys from Redmond can milk these patents for billions every year, they're going to keep them.

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Is Microsoft Trying To Attack Open Source And Linux With Its “Patent Bombs”?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Legal

Last week, Microsoft got involved in a legal issue and secured patent licenses from Wistron of Taiwan and Rakuten of Japan around Linux and Android technologies. While Microsoft is already making billions with its patents in Android, its history of Linux-related patent trolling isn’t hidden from anyone. The open source community remains frightened of Microsoft as no one knows who could be the next one to get a notice from Microsoft’s legal guys.

In another case that violates the trust of open source community, Microsoft has recently claimed that it came up with the idea for Continuum and “invented” the concept. On the other hand, Canonical has been working on Convergence since 2013, even though it was never released to the public up until recently.

There’s no doubt that Microsoft has made some serious contributions to the open source community and expressed its love for Linux. However, if Redmond really cares, it should work transparently to win the trust of the open source community as any company’s success in the world of open source depends on its users and developers.

Satya Nadella should also consider joining the Open Innovation Network (OIN) and sending a message the open source world to become a trusted member of the community.

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50 shades of Microsoft's flirtation with Linux

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

If Microsoft really cares about Linux and open source, if they really want to be part of the community. they must win the trust of the community. As I've said before and will say again, if Microsoft really loves Linux, they must make a public pledge to not go after Linux. They should join the Open Innovation Network (OIN) to send a message to the Linux and open source world that they are in it with us, that they are not going to attack us, to destroy us if we use Linux.

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More in Tux Machines

Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.12 Snaps Creator with New Parts Ecosystem, More

Today, June 29, 2016, Canonical has had the great pleasure of announcing the release of the highly anticipated Snapcraft 2.12 Snappy creator tool for the Ubuntu Linux operating system. Read more

AMDGPU-PRO Driver 16.30 Officially Released with Support for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Today, June 29, 2016, AMD released the final version of the AMDGPU-Pro 16.30 graphics driver for GNU/Linux operating systems, bringing support for new technologies like the Vulkan API. Read more

Red Hat News

Peppermint 7 Released

Peppermint 7 launched a few days ago. Peppermint is a lightweight Ubuntu-based Linux distribution with an emphasis on speed and simplicity. Although the name is similar to Linux Mint, the projects aren't directly related. Peppermint originally was envisioned as a "spicier" alternative to Mint—whatever that means! Many distros come with a wide assortment of feature-rich applications, and that's great for power users who need those apps. But older machines can struggle to cope with those demanding distros. Peppermint solves the problem by offering a carefully curated suite of web apps that perform tasks traditionally handled by native apps. It's an approach that will be familiar to any Chromebook users reading this article. Read more