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Microservices and Microsoft Screwing With Kubernetes

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Server
Microsoft
  • 3 tips for moving your team to a microservices architecture

    Microservices are gaining in popularity and providing new ways for tech companies to improve their services for end users. But what impact does the shift to microservices have on team culture and morale? What issues should CTOs, developers, and project managers consider when the best technological choice is a move to microservices?

    Below you’ll find key advice and insight from CTOs and project leads as they reflect on their experiences with team culture and microservices.

  • Microsoft's Azure Kubernetes Service mucked my cluster!

    Microsoft's Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) was launched to world+dog in June, however, a few disgruntled customers say the managed container confection isn't fully baked yet.

    In a blog post published on Monday, Prashant Deva, creator of an app and infrastructure monitoring service called DripStat, savaged AKS, calling it "an alpha service marked as GA [generally available] by Microsoft."

    Deva said he moved his company's production workload to AKS last month, and has been plagued by random DNS failures for domains outside of Azure and hostnames inside the Azure Virtual Network.

    He characterized the response from Microsoft support – advice not to use excessive memory and CPU resources – as ridiculous, and said Microsoft failed to respond when told the DNS issues occurred mainly during application startup when memory and CPU usage is minimal.

Installing Windows apps on Linux is about to get easier with Winepak

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

If you've ever wanted to make the switch to Linux, but the idea of leaving behind Windows apps always seemed to be a stumbling block, you might know about Wine. Wine is a compatibility layer capable of running Windows applications on Linux and other POSIX-compliant operating systems. However, to many users, Wine itself has been a bit of a hurdle, as it isn't always considered the most user-friendly tool. That is about to change.

How? Have you ever heard of Flatpak? If not, Flatpak provides a sandbox environment in which users can run applications in isolation from the rest of the system. These applications are containerized, so you don't have to worry about dependencies. You install the container and it runs. Simple as that.

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Chromebook Marketing Badmouths Windows, MacOS

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GNU
Linux
Google
Microsoft
Mac

OS Turf Wars

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GNU
Linux
Google
Microsoft
  • Build your own Chrome/Linux operating system with Chromium OS and Crostini

    Google is slowly starting to add support for running Linux applications on Chromebooks. But as I discovered when I tested Linux apps on the Acer Chromebook Tab 10 recently, it’s still a work in progress. The feature also isn’t available for all Chrome OS computers yet.

    That could change in the not-too-distant future. Right now you need to be running Chrome OS in the developer channel in order to enable Linux app support. There are signs that Linux app support could hit the Chrome OS beta channel this week, and it could graduate to the stable channel by the time Chrome OS 69 is released later this year.

  • Germans swing another putsch against Linux [Ed: This isn't a technical decision. It cannot be technical. I reckon some politicians/suits had too many dinners with Microsoft and maybe bribes too (like the Munich saga)]

    As initially reported by Heise, the state's tax authority has 13,000 workstations running OpenSuse -- which it adopted in 2006 in a well-received migration from Solaris -- that it now wants to migrate to a "current version" of Windows, presumably Windows 10.

  • With DaaS Windows coming, say goodbye to your PC as you know it

    Now Microsoft, which helped lead that revolution, is trying to return us to that old, centralized control model.

    Forget that noise. If Microsoft continues on this course, soon your only real choices if you really want a “desktop” operating system will be Linux and macOS. Oh, you’ll still have “Windows.” But Windows as your “personal” desktop? It will be history.

Microsoft: Windows Ransom, EEE, War on GNU/Linux and Putting PowerShell (with .NET) on GNU/Linux

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Microsoft
  • Shipping company’s networks in the Americas crippled by ransomware attack

     

    In a statement published Thursday, COSCO officials said the failures affected networks in the US, Canada, Panama, Argentina, Brazil, Peru, Chile, and Uruguay. The statement said people who wanted to reach COSCO employees in those countries should use special email addresses, many of which were hosted by Yahoo and Gmail. Attempts to reach COSCO’s US-based website were unsuccessful. COSCO officials said main business operation systems were performing stably and that ports in California and the UK remained open.

  • Microsoft Moves Ahead With Renaming "GVFS" Project To "VFS For Git" [Ed: Embrace and extend, making git in some forms a Microsoft 'thing'. What Exchange did to E-mail Microsoft does to Git. See the comments there too.]
  • 2018 not yet the year of Desktop Linux as Lower Saxony plans to migrate 13000 OpenSUSE PCs to Windows 10
  • 25 Years of Slackware, PowerShell Snap, REAPER on Linux, Linux Geek Bundle | This Week in Linux 33

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we celebrate the 25th Anniversary of Slackware, Humble Bundle is running a “Linux Geek Bundle”, Microsoft makes PowerShell Available as a Snap, and we get a sneak peak at System76 Manufacturing Facility. We got a lot of App News this week with a new release of Latte Dock 0.8, preview builds for the music production tool – REAPER and then we’ll check out some cool projects starting with Almond, an Open Virtual Assistantm, and hledger, a command line accounting software. Librem 5 Development Boards have been delayed, and Liberapay Is In Trouble. Then in Gaming News, we’ll check out a Guitar Hero clone and the upgrades to the Atari VCS. Finally rounding out the show, we talk about why Proprietary Software is awful for security. Reports have found that a Voting Machine Vendor installed remote access software, Airport data breach and Cisco’s troubles with backdoors. All that and much more!

The Microsoft Tax and Tax Authorities

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Windows scores a win over Linux as another state decides to switch

Filed under
Microsoft
SUSE

The authority reasons that many of its field workers and telephone support services already use Windows, so standardisation makes sense. An upgrade of some kind would in any case be necessary soon, as the PCs are running OpenSuse versions 12.2 and 13.2, neither of which is supported anymore.

According to the Lower Saxony's draft budget, €5.9m is set aside for the migration in the coming year, with a further €7m annually over the following years; it's not yet clear how many years the migration would take.

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A Freedom Perspective. Let's Catch Up

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

There is a computer in the home, but it's a laptop assigned to Tanya from the hospital and the kids are not allowed access. There was a home computer for a while, one that was given to them, but during a Windows 8 update, it blue screened and they were never able to get it to work again. A neighbor takes the girls to the library to use the computers there but there is often a line and only 1 hour's use per individual. The neighbor that shuttles the girls to and from the library contacted me to see if Reglue could help.

It's nothing fancy. A dual core i5 HP with 8 gigs of RAM and a 23 inch Asus monitor. It was 9:30 on the evening of the 4th and the family gathered around for me to introduce them to their new computer. We could hear the local city fireworks show begin with a salvo of booms and fizzle pops. As I opened the menu, Tanya explained that the computer they had was not supposed to do any updates, and that was the update that ruined their computer. The lady that gave them the machine told her that she had to do those updates herself and that it was safer that way. Tanya could not understand why the computer chose the middle of the night to update itself on it's own and then kill itself.

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Openwashing, Spying and Microsoft EEE

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Microsoft

LibreOffice With Microsoft DRM and a Tax

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LibO
Microsoft
Legal
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Open-source hardware could defend against the next generation of hacking

Imagine you had a secret document you had to store away from prying eyes. And you have a choice: You could buy a safe made by a company that kept the workings of its locks secret. Or you could buy a safe whose manufacturer openly published the designs, letting everyone – including thieves – see how they’re made. Which would you choose? It might seem unexpected, but as an engineering professor, I’d pick the second option. The first one might be safe – but I simply don’t know. I’d have to take the company’s word for it. Maybe it’s a reputable company with a longstanding pedigree of quality, but I’d be betting my information’s security on the company upholding its traditions. By contrast, I can judge the security of the second safe for myself – or ask an expert to evaluate it. I’ll be better informed about how secure my safe is, and therefore more confident that my document is safe inside it. That’s the value of open-source technology. Read more

Ubuntu 18.10: What’s New? [Video]

But how do you follow up the brilliant Bionic Beaver? It’s far from being an easy task and, alas, the collected changes you’ll find accrued in the ‘Cosmic Cuttlefish’ are of the “down-to-earth” variety rather than the “out-of-this-world” ones you might’ve been hoping for. But don’t take our word for it; find out yourself by watching our Ubuntu 18.10 video (and it’s best watched with headphones because, ahem, I can level sound properly). In 3 minute and 18 seconds we whizz you through everything that’s new, neat and noticeable in Ubuntu 18.10. Read more

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