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Microsoft

Proprietary OS as an 'App'

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Microsoft
  • Windows 95 Is Now Available on Linux, Mac, and Windows as an Electron App

    If you want to have some fun this coming weekend pranking your colleagues or friends, there's now an Electron app with Microsoft's Windows 95 operating system that you can run on Linux, Mac, or even Windows computers.

    Yes, you're reading it right, someone just packed the very old Windows 95 operating system in an Electron app, which can be installed on any platform thanks to GitHub's open-source framework for building and distributing universal binaries on Windows, Linux, and Mac systems.

    According to developer Felix Rieseberg, you'll get the full Windows 95 experience after installing and running his new Electron app, no matter what operating system you're currently using. The Windows 95 Electron app has a little over 100MB in size and it works quite well even though was meant as a joke.

  • Download Windows 95 as a Windows, Mac, or Linux App, Because You Can

    Miss the mid 90s? Me neither, but Windows 95 still gives me a good feeling. You can download it right now if you want.

  • Run Windows 95 on Your Desktop as an Electron App

    Fancy running Windows 95 on your Ubuntu, macOS or Windows 10 desktop? Of course you don’t, but for some bizarre reason you now can. A developer by the name of Felix Rieseberg has resurrected Microsoft’s ancient OS using the power of Electron, a cross-platform app development framework.

You want how much?! Israel opts not to renew its Office 365 vows

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Microsoft

Microsoft’s desire to move users into the exciting world of Office 365 subscriptions has been dealt a blow as the Israeli government took a look and said “no thanks.”

In a statement given to The Register, the Israeli Ministry of Finance explained that it currently spends more than 100m Israel New Shekels (£21.3m) per year on Microsoft’s software products.

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Microsoft Entryism

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Microsoft

SUSE is Still Working for Microsoft

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Microsoft
SUSE

Microsoft Openwashing

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Microsoft
  • Microsoft open sources new framework for Windows driver development [Ed: openwashing Microsoft Windows by pretending that when you write proprietary drivers for a proprietary O/S that does DRM, spies on users etc. you actually do something "open"]
  • Microsoft to Open Source Its Network Replication Software [Ed: Microsoft is openwashing some more of its entirely proprietary 'offerings', a hallmark of a company of liars. Come to us! The traps are free, the cages will be "open".]
  • GitHub goes off the Rails as Microsoft closes in [Ed: Microsoft will take GitHub off the rail like it did Skype and LinkedIn (totally lost)]

    GitHub's platform group is about 155 people at the moment and growing, said Lambert. And much of the group's focus is on breaking GitHub apart.

    GitHub is about a third of the way through an architectural change that began last year. The company is moving away from Ruby on Rails toward a more heterogeneous, composable infrastructure. Ruby still has a place at GitHub – Lambert referred to the company as a Ruby shop, but he said there's more Go, Java and even some Haskell being deployed for services. The goal, he explained, is to make GitHub's internal capabilities accessible to integrators and partners.

    "Our monolith is starting to break up and we're starting to abstract things into services," said Lambert. "The platform we've chosen to put them on is Kubernetes."

Microsoft Versus Linux

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Valve is seemingly working on a way to make Windows Steam games playable on Linux

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Gaming

It looks like Valve is working behind the scenes on enabling Linux game compatibility tools to work on Steam.

These compatibility tools allow games developed for Windows to work on Linux, similar to how the popular tool Wine has been doing for years on Linux and other Unix-based operating systems.

Earlier this week, strings of code were discovered by SteamDB in Steam’s database.

The code appears to be referencing an as yet to be revealed compatibility mode, complete with several UI elements, a settings menu, and what looks like the ability to force it on.

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Microsoft Openwashing and Infiltration Tactics

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Microsoft
OSS

Microsoft and Apple Piggybacking the Competition

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Microsoft
Mac

Microsoft EEE and Openwashing

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Microsoft
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Open-source hardware could defend against the next generation of hacking

Imagine you had a secret document you had to store away from prying eyes. And you have a choice: You could buy a safe made by a company that kept the workings of its locks secret. Or you could buy a safe whose manufacturer openly published the designs, letting everyone – including thieves – see how they’re made. Which would you choose? It might seem unexpected, but as an engineering professor, I’d pick the second option. The first one might be safe – but I simply don’t know. I’d have to take the company’s word for it. Maybe it’s a reputable company with a longstanding pedigree of quality, but I’d be betting my information’s security on the company upholding its traditions. By contrast, I can judge the security of the second safe for myself – or ask an expert to evaluate it. I’ll be better informed about how secure my safe is, and therefore more confident that my document is safe inside it. That’s the value of open-source technology. Read more

Ubuntu 18.10: What’s New? [Video]

But how do you follow up the brilliant Bionic Beaver? It’s far from being an easy task and, alas, the collected changes you’ll find accrued in the ‘Cosmic Cuttlefish’ are of the “down-to-earth” variety rather than the “out-of-this-world” ones you might’ve been hoping for. But don’t take our word for it; find out yourself by watching our Ubuntu 18.10 video (and it’s best watched with headphones because, ahem, I can level sound properly). In 3 minute and 18 seconds we whizz you through everything that’s new, neat and noticeable in Ubuntu 18.10. Read more

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