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Microsoft

$5m daily fine beckons for bad boy Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft
Legal

Although the European Commission's statements are diplomatic to the point of opacity, there's no mistaking what it thinks of the latest turn in the Microsoft antitrust saga. The Commission doesn't think Microsoft's trying hard enough, and it has canvassed widespread industry support to bolster its position. From a Microsoft document unearthed by ZDNet, and still available here [PDF 450kb], we can see why even long time Redmond partners are losing their patience.

Windows Media Player Digital Rights Management Spy

Filed under
Microsoft
Security

This is something really nasty in the XP filing system... it's in Windows Media Player, and it not only has all the information about Digital Rights Management, it also has all the information about your local police force..... QED... Not only is microsoft spying on you, they are also telling the cops what you have got on your system....

MSN TV hacker jailed

Filed under
Microsoft
Legal

A Louisiana man has been sent to prison for six months for sending a malicious e-mail to Microsoft MSN TV customers.

The e-mails the convicted man sent out contained an attachment that the mails claimed would re-set their TV’s display colours when opened. Instead, the attachment contained script that re-programmed customers’ TV boxes to dial 911 instead of a local phone number to access Microsoft’s servers.

Microsoft's PUMA to prevent theft of audio data

Filed under
Microsoft

At the end of April at the WinHEC 2005 developers´ conference Microsoft intends to furnish further details on the copy protection functions of the successor to Windows XP Longhorn, which is planned for 2006.

Microsoft Monopoly Will Wane, Experts Say

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft's Explorer browser is already losing market share. It recently fell below the 90 percent mark because of competition from such rivals as the Firefox open-source browser. The Massachusetts Institute of Techology's Thomas Malone said he wouldn't predict how much Microsoft's dominance might fall.

Don't dump your stocks in the software giant, experts warn.

Microsoft's Sun server fetish revealed

Filed under
Microsoft
Humor

Shocking pictures leaked by a careless Microsoft blogger reveal a love that dare not speak its name. The photos from the Redmond campus are, in fact, so raunchy and audacious that a special Register editorial meeting was held to discuss whether or not they should even be discussed in an open forum. In the end, we decided to go ahead with the photos. It seemed like the right thing to do.

M$ to Pay $60 million Settlement

Filed under
Microsoft
Legal

Microsoft will pay Burst.com, a developer of software for streaming audio and video over the Internet, $60 million to settle a patent infringement and antitrust lawsuit, the world's largest software maker said on Friday.

Director of the SSI at M$ Speaks

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Jason Matusow, the Director of the Shared Source Initiative at Microsoft shares his views and interpretations of Open Source licenses and what they mean to M$ in terms of development.

Gates keeps top spot on list of billionaires

Filed under
Microsoft

Thanks to a surge in demand for steel, the Internet and Scandinavian sofas, there are some new names among the very richest of the world's billionaires.

The billionaires are richer and more numerous for the second straight year, but the No. 1 spot is unchanged — Microsoft founder Bill Gates led the list for the 11th year in a row with a net worth of $46.5 billion, slightly less than his $46.6 billion last year.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Updates, VLC FUD and LinuxSecurity Turning 20

  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (libsdl2-image and libxslt), Oracle (java-1.8.0-openjdk and java-11-openjdk), Scientific Linux (java-1.8.0-openjdk and java-11-openjdk), SUSE (bzip2, microcode_ctl, and ucode-intel), and Ubuntu (clamav, evince, linux-hwe, linux-gcp, linux-snapdragon, and squid3).

  • Dodgy vids can hijack PCs via VLC security flaw, US, Germany warn. Software's makers not app-y with that claim

    In a bug-tracking ticket discussing CVE-2019-13615, VideoLAN lead developer Jean-Baptiste Kempf noted that he was unable to recreate the crash using a proof-of-concept .MP4 video, provided by a security researcher four weeks ago, that's supposed to knacker the latest version of VLC, 3.0.7.1. Nor was he able to crash the older 3.0.6 and work-in-progress releases, such as 3.0.8, he reported. "This does not crash a normal release of VLC 3.0.7.1," added Kempf. "Sorry, but this bug is not reproducible and does not crash VLC at all." VLC developer Francois Cartegnie was more blunt earlier today: "If you land on this ticket through a news article claiming a critical flaw in VLC, I suggest you to read the above comment first and reconsider your (fake) news sources."

  • Our Linux Sister Linuxsecurity.com are Celebrating their 20th Anniversary by Launching a New Website

    LinuxSecurity.com is the community’s central source for information on Linux and open source security. They follow the open source trends as they affect the community. Also they produce content that appeals to administrators, developers, home users, and security professionals. Having created a site that satisfies the needs of both IT professionals – including engineers, programmers, designers and system administrators – and those individuals seeking to learn more about security and open source, LinuxSecurity.com has grown to encompass not only their website but also two leading industry email newsletters, Linux Security Newsletter and Security Advisories Weekly.

Fedora and IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

  • ThinkPad X1 Carbon 6th gen on Fedora
  • Multitenant deployment of MongoDB using OpenShift Container Storage and using YCSB to test performance
  • IBM gives cancer-killing drug AI project to the open source community

    IBM has released three artificial intelligence (AI) projects tailored to take on the challenge of curing cancer to the open-source community. At the 18th European Conference on Computational Biology (ECCB) and the 27th Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology (ISMB), which will be held in Switzerland later this month, the tech giant will dive into how each of the projects can advance our understanding of cancers and their treatment. 

  • IBM Open Sources Cancer-Fighting AI Project

    Now, the company has decided to make all three tools open-source, meaning scientists will be able to use them in their research whenever they please, according to ZDNet. The tools are designed to streamline the cancer drug development process and help scientists stay on top of newly-published research — so, if they prove useful, it could mean more cancer treatments coming through the pipeline more rapidly than before.

  • An OpenShift Administrator’s Guide to Onboarding Applications

    Infrastructure teams managing Red Hat OpenShift often ask me how to effectively onboard applications in production. OpenShift embeds many functionalities in a single product and it is fair to imagine an OpenShift administrator struggling to figure out what sort of conversations his team must have with an application team before successfully running an application on OpenShift. In this article, I suggest a few topics that administrators could use to actively engage with fellow application teams for the onboarding process. I have had several conversations with customers on these topics and observed that suggested approach has really helped them. By no means are these topics exhaustive, but they are sufficient to kick start the necessary and relevant conversations. Over time, I expect administrators to have larger conversations with application teams in application onboarding. 

  • OpenWhisk Gets Its Apache Software Diploma

    The OpenWhisk open source serverless platform hit graduation status as a Top-Level Project at the Apache Software Foundation. The designation comes as the serverless ecosystem continues its rapid evolution in meeting the production needs of organizations. The OpenWhisk project itself was initially born out of IBM, which donated its beta-level code into the Apache Incubator project in late 2016. IBM was using that codebase to support functions running on its IBM Cloud.

  • The browser wars and the birth of JavaScript

    Before anything like an Android device or iPhone existed, desktop computers were the battleground for the browser wars. The battle involved billions of dollars invested by a number of companies, all based on the premise that whoever ruled the desktop browser market would own the internet. Today, mobile devices account for nearly half of all website traffic. Back in the 1990s, however, almost all of the action on the web came from desktop machines, and the vast majority of those desktop machines were running some flavor of Microsoft Windows. In the browser world, the first-mover advantage belonged to Netscape Communications Corporation. They built the Netscape Navigator browser that made the web accessible to millions for the first time. Netscape had more than 80% of the market, but they also had no shortage of competition. IBM had a browser for OS/2. Oracle had the Powerbrowser, a Netscape-compatible product that included something called the Database Markup Language. The real danger to Netscape, of course, came from the company that owned more than 80% of the world’s desktops: Microsoft. Strategically, Netscape realized that the web needed to move past static web pages to reach its full potential. Even if they were created dynamically by something like a CGI script on the web server, pages didn’t change once they arrived in your browser. If you wanted to see even a slightly modified version of a page, you had to send a request back to the server and wait for a response. For all its sophistication, a web browser felt a lot like a dumb terminal attached to a mainframe. What web developers needed was a programming language that would run in the browser, taking advantage of the processing power of the desktop machine to give users a richer experience. [...] JavaScript’s dominance was cemented by the emergence of Node.js on the server side. At a minimum, it gave web developers the ability to take their JavaScript skills from the client to the server. Combined with the ability to pass functions as objects (callbacks), Node.js’s event loop popularized a whole new programming model. Suddenly, you could write a web server in just a few lines of code. Then, the rise of the Node Package Manager (npm) to manage dependencies meant a very small application could leverage other packages to do really sophisticated things. As a self-serving example, the knative-proxy package in the Coderland Compile Driver needs fewer than 40 lines of code to handle the HTTP POST and OPTIONS verbs. And it took yr author maybe 30 minutes to write. JavaScript is a simple, unpretentious language that has its fingers in every corner of your life. Turn off JavaScript in your browser and see how much of the web doesn’t work anymore. (Philosophical arguments as to whether that’s a good or bad thing are left to the reader.) No matter how or where you use the internet, Brendan Eich’s 10-day coding spree is the most important sprint in the history of computing. You don’t have to like JavaScript, but if you make a living developing for the web, you have to learn it.

Programming: Python, GCC and More

  • Stack Abuse: Python for NLP: Word Embeddings for Deep Learning in Keras

    This is the 16th article in my series of articles on Python for NLP. In my previous article I explained how N-Grams technique can be used to develop a simple automatic text filler in Python. N-Gram model is basically a way to convert text data into numeric form so that it can be used by statisitcal algorithms. Before N-Grams, I explained the bag of words and TF-IDF approaches, which can also be used to generate numeric feature vectors from text data. Till now we have been using machine learning appraoches to perform different NLP tasks such as text classification, topic modeling, sentimental analysis, text summarization, etc. In this article we will start our discussion about deep learning techniques for NLP. Deep learning approaches consist of different types of densely connected neural networks. These approaches have been proven efficient to solve several complex tasks such as self-driving cars, image generation, image segmentation, etc. Deep learning approaches have also been proven quite efficient for NLP tasks. In this article, we will study word embeddings for NLP tasks that involve deep learning. We will see how word embeddings can be used to perform simple classification task using deep neural network in Python's Keras Library.

  • Python with JSON Files

    With the growth and evolution of challenges in computer science, Python continues to rise as the primarily sought-after programming skill to solve data science problems.

  • Logging in Python

    Logging is a very useful tool in a programmer’s toolbox. It can help you develop a better understanding of the flow of a program and discover scenarios that you might not even have thought of while developing. Logs provide developers with an extra set of eyes that are constantly looking at the flow that an application is going through. They can store information, like which user or IP accessed the application. If an error occurs, then they can provide more insights than a stack trace by telling you what the state of the program was before it arrived at the line of code where the error occurred.

  • Let’s Build A Simple Interpreter. Part 16: Recognizing Procedure Calls

    Today we’re going to extend our interpreter to recognize procedure calls. I hope by now you’ve flexed your coding muscles and are ready to tackle this step. This is a necessary step for us before we can learn how to execute procedure calls, which will be a topic that we will cover in great detail in future articles. The goal for today is to make sure that when our interpreter reads a program with a procedure call, the parser constructs an Abstract Syntax Tree (AST) with a new tree node for the procedure call, and the semantic analyzer and the interpreter don’t throw any errors when walking the AST.

  • Playing Tic Tac Toe using Reinforcement Learning

    I have always been fascinated by the amazing work done by OpenAI. The one that stood out to me was a AI bot that could play the massively popular game - Dota 2. Dota 2 used to be the escape from the real world for me and my friends while I was in high school. This inspired me to learn more about the field of RL. I wanted to start small so I started with Tic Tac Toe.

  • Python zip function tutorial (Simple Examples)

    The zip() function in Python programming is a built-in standard function that takes multiple iterables or containers as parameters. An iterable in Python is an object that can be iterated or stepped through like a collection. The zip() function is used to map the same indexes of more than one iterable. Mapping these indexes will generate a zip object.

  • GCC 10 Compiler Picks Up New Scheduler Model & Cost Tables For AMD Zen 2 Processors

    While AMD developers published their "Znver2" compiler patches for Zen 2 originally back in November, months ahead of the recent Ryzen 3000 series launch, this compiler support was incomplete as it re-used the existing scheduler model and costs table of Znver1. Now though one of SUSE's compiler experts who often works in cooperation with AMD has published the new Znver2 scheduler model and costs table for Zen 2. The updated costs table better reflects the "costs" of moving and loading various registers and different instructions compared to Znver1 so the compiler can make wiser decisions for the most efficient usage. With these updated costs to reflect faster multiplication and 256 vector paths, there is better GNU C Library performance in particular and SUSE developer Jan Hubicka noted that the memory copy performance "wins" even for small blocks.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #378 (July 23, 2019)

Graphics: Mesa 19.1.3, RADV and Radeon

  • Mesa 19.1.3
    Mesa 19.1.3 is now available.
    
    In this release we have:
    
    Mostly in fixes for ANV and RADV drivers, as well as NIR backend fixes.
    
    Several of those patches fixe actually crashes with the drivers,
    and a couple of them fix memory leaks.
    
    
    Bas Nieuwenhuizen (3):
          radv: Handle cmask being disallowed by addrlib.
          anv: Add android dependencies on android.
          radv: Only save the descriptor set if we have one.
    
    Caio Marcelo de Oliveira Filho (2):
          anv: Fix pool allocator when first alloc needs to grow
          spirv: Fix stride calculation when lowering Workgroup to offsets
    
    Chia-I Wu (2):
          anv: fix VkExternalBufferProperties for unsupported handles
          anv: fix VkExternalBufferProperties for host allocation
    
    Connor Abbott (1):
          nir: Add a helper to determine if an intrinsic can be reordered
    
    Dave Airlie (1):
          radv: fix crash in shader tracing.
    
    Eric Anholt (1):
          freedreno: Fix assertion failures in context setup in shader-db mode.
    
    Gert Wollny (1):
          softpipe: Remove unused static function
    
    Ian Romanick (4):
          intel/vec4: Reswizzle VF immediates too
          nir: Add unit tests for nir_opt_comparison_pre
          nir: Use nir_src_bit_size instead of alu1->dest.dest.ssa.bit_size
          mesa: Set minimum possible GLSL version
    
    Jason Ekstrand (13):
          nir/instr_set: Expose nir_instrs_equal()
          nir/loop_analyze: Fix phi-of-identical-alu detection
          nir: Add more helpers for working with const values
          nir/loop_analyze: Handle bit sizes correctly in calculate_iterations
          nir/loop_analyze: Bail if we encounter swizzles
          anv: Set Stateless Data Port Access MOCS
          nir/opt_if: Clean up single-src phis in opt_if_loop_terminator
          nir,intel: Add support for lowering 64-bit nir_opt_extract_*
          anv: Account for dynamic stencil write disables in the PMA fix
          nir/regs_to_ssa: Handle regs in phi sources properly
          nir/loop_analyze: Refactor detection of limit vars
          nir: Add some helpers for chasing SSA values properly
          nir/loop_analyze: Properly handle swizzles in loop conditions
    
    Juan A. Suarez Romero (3):
          docs: add sha256 checksums for 19.1.2
          Update version to 19.1.3
          docs: add release notes for 19.1.3
    
    Lepton Wu (1):
          virgl: Set meta data for textures from handle.
    
    Lionel Landwerlin (6):
          vulkan/overlay: fix command buffer stats
          vulkan/overlay: fix crash on freeing NULL command buffer
          anv: fix crash in vkCmdClearAttachments with unused attachment
          vulkan/wsi: update swapchain status on vkQueuePresent
          anv: report timestampComputeAndGraphics true
          anv: fix format mapping for depth/stencil formats
    
    Marek Olšák (1):
          radeonsi: don't set READ_ONLY for const_uploader to fix bindless texture hangs
    
    Samuel Iglesias Gonsálvez (1):
          anv: fix alphaToCoverage when there is no color attachment
    
    Samuel Pitoiset (1):
          radv: fix VGT_GS_MODE if VS uses the primitive ID
    
    Sergii Romantsov (1):
          meta: memory leak of CopyPixels usage
    
    Timothy Arceri (1):
          mesa: save/restore SSO flag when using ARB_get_program_binary
    
    Vinson Lee (1):
          meson: Add dep_thread dependency.
    
    Yevhenii Kolesnikov (1):
          meta: leaking of BO with DrawPixels
    
    git tag: mesa-19.1.3
    
  • Mesa 19.1.3 Led By Fixes For Intel & Radeon Vulkan Drivers

    If you are sticking to stable versions of Mesa, the Mesa 19.1.3 point release is out today as the latest and greatest version of this collection of open-source graphics drivers. Changes for Mesa 19.1.3 are led by the Intel "ANV" and Radeon "RADV" Vulkan drivers. Among those Vulkan driver fixes are taking care of Android dependencies for ANV, external buffer properties fixes for Intel, a crash in shader tracing for RADV, and various other fixes.

  • RADV Lands Binning Support For GFX10/Navi For Faster Vulkan Performance

    The latest change for Mesa 19.2 to better the new Radeon RX 5000 "Navi" series support is binning in the RADV driver. Following all the prep work, Bas Nieuwenhuizen flipped on the binning functionality within the RADV Vulkan API driver for GFX10 (Navi). With testing Talos Principle as a test scenario for primitive binning, Bas found the frame-rates to improve by about 6%. That's not too surprising and most Vulkan games should see frame-rates improve by about a couple of percent if the Vega primitive binning numbers are any indicator from when that support landed in RADV.

  • Radeon Cauldron 1.0 Released As AMD's New SDK Framework

    Radeon Cauldron 1.0 is AMD's new graphics SDK framework for developing Vulkan and Direct3D 12 demos/prototypes/samples. The GPUOpen developers describe this new framework as "like having a simplified game engine that you can learn and modify in little time." Radeon Cauldron makes it easy to load up glTF 2.0 models and to display in either Vulkan or D3D12, flexibility to encompass more graphics features over time, is written using vanilla C++, and has already been used by different teams within AMD.