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Microsoft

Microsoft slams Windows

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Microsoft

Microsoft yesterday slammed its own networking and hardware support in Windows XP, only to see a keyboard fail using a beta version of Longhorn.

"In the past we really have not taken as systematic approach as we should have. We put things together not really thinking through the end-to-end scenarios and this is why at times we have failed to deliver."

We Test Drive Windows XP Professional x64 Edition

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Microsoft

With Windows XP Professional x64 Edition now available to the public, we were eager to get our hands on the final version of the product and compare it to the earlier release candidate versions. We found no major surprises. The final shipping version of XP x64 Edition looks exactly like its predecessors and could easily pass for the 32-bit version of XP Professional.

Something Rotten in the State of Denmark

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Microsoft

In January this year the Department of Environment suddenly declared that it had chosen to carry on with Microsoft’s Office Suite, in spite of recommendations to move to open source. In other words : if the citizens want to communicate flawlessly with the government they’ll have to license a copy of that suite from Microsoft. Pay or shut up. Maybe that’s no coincidence. Just prior to the decision on software patents, Mr. Bill Gates paid a “friendly” visit to the Danish Prime Minister, Mr. Anders Fogh Rasmussen. According to the Danish financial newspaper “Borsen” Mr. Gates made it very clear to Mr. Rasmussen, that if Denmark rejected the Directive Microsoft would have to move its Navision branch to the US.

Does Longhorn Even Matter?

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Microsoft

From ZDNet's "Not Linux" department, Joe Brockmeier asks in his blog, "Is Longhorn all hat and no cattle?"

Graphics patent suit fires back at M$

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Microsoft
Legal

Forgent Networks has filed a lawsuit against Microsoft, alleging the software giant infringed on its digital-image compression patent that serves as the technology behind JPEG.

CA cities try again for M$ damages

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Microsoft
Legal

Five Californian cities and counties have said they are committed to collecting damages from Microsoft despite a US District Judge dismissing their class action lawsuit against the software giant.

Ballmer grins and bears Linux--a little

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Linux
Microsoft

Despite his fondness for Windows, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer says the company will make it easier for businesses to manage a wide variety of machines--including those running Linux.

Windows Server 2003 SP1 Breaks 14 Apps

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Microsoft

As with last year's desktop security update, Windows XP SP2, Microsoft's newest server security upgrade, Windows Server 2003 SP1, breaks 14 applications, including a few from Microsoft itself, the Redmond, Wash.-based company has acknowledged in an online support document.

Yes, Linux Is Competition For Us, Admits Microsoft

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Linux
Microsoft

And this comes straight from the horse's mouth! Software giant Microsoft has finally acknowledged Linux as its strongest competitor, much to the delight of Australia s open source industry association.

Longhorn bashed by MacDailyNews

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Microsoft
Mac

Not that I really follow Mac development too closely, however MacDailyNews is running a humorous, if not sarcastic, look at M$' peek into their upcoming Longhorn release. One quote in response to supposed new features states, "Oh yeah, a "big deal," unless you bought a Mac five years ago."

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Q4OS Linux Revives Your Old Laptop and Give it Windows Looks

Q4OS is a lightweight Linux distribution based on Debian. It imitates the look and feel of Windows. Read the complete review to know more about Q4OS Linux. Read more

Android Leftovers

today's leftovers

  • Clear Linux Has A Goal To Get 3x More Upstream Components In Their Distro
    For those concerned that running Clear Linux means less available packages/bundles than the likes of Debian, Arch Linux, and Fedora with their immense collection of packaged software, Clear has a goal this year of increasing their upstream components available on the distribution by three times. Intel Fellow Arjan van de Ven provided an update on their bundling state/changes for the distribution. In this update he shared that the Clear Linux team at Intel established a goal this year to have "three times more upstream components in the distro. That's a steep growth, and we want to do that with some basic direction and without reducing quality/etc. We have some folks figuring out what things are the most desired that we lack, so we can add those with most priority... but this is where again we more than welcome feedback."
  • The results from our past three Linux distro polls
    You might think this annual poll would be fairly similar from year to year, from what distros we list to how people answer, but the results are wildly different from year to year. (At the time of the creation of each poll, we pull the top 15 distributions according to DistroWatch over the past 12 months.) Last year, the total votes tallied in at 15,574! And the winner was PCLinuxOS with Ubuntu a close second. Another interesting point is that in 2018, there were 950 votes for "other" and 122 comments compared to this year with only 367 votes for "other" and 69 comments.
  • Fedora Strategy FAQ Part 3: What does this mean for Fedora releases?
    Fedora operating system releases are (largely) time-based activity where a new base operating system (kernel, libraries, compilers) is built and tested against our Editions for functionality. This provides a new source for solutions to be built on. The base operating systems may continue to be maintained on the current 13 month life cycle — or services that extend that period may be provided in the future. A solution is never obligated to build against all currently maintained bases.
  • How open data and tools can save lives during a disaster
    If you've lived through a major, natural disaster, you know that during the first few days you'll probably have to rely on a mental map, instead of using a smartphone as an extension of your brain. Where's the closest hospital with disaster care? What about shelters? Gas stations? And how many soft story buildings—with their propensity to collapse—will you have to zig-zag around to get there? Trying to answer these questions after moving back to earthquake-prone San Francisco is why I started the Resiliency Maps project. The idea is to store information about assets, resources, and hazards in a given geographical area in a map that you can download and print out. The project contributes to and is powered by OpenStreetMap (OSM), and the project's entire toolkit is open source, ensuring that the maps will be available to anyone who wants to use them.
  • Millions of websites threatened by highly critical code-execution bug in Drupal

    Drupal is the third most-widely used CMS behind WordPress and Joomla. With an estimated 3 percent to 4 percent of the world's billion-plus websites, that means Drupal runs tens of millions of sites. Critical flaws in any CMS are popular with hackers, because the vulnerabilities can be unleashed against large numbers of sites with a single, often-easy-to-write script.

  • Avoiding the coming IoT dystopia
    Bradley Kuhn works for the Software Freedom Conservancy (SFC) and part of what that organization does is to think about the problems that software freedom may encounter in the future. SFC worries about what will happen with the four freedoms as things change in the world. One of those changes is already upon us: the Internet of Things (IoT) has become quite popular, but it has many dangers, he said. Copyleft can help; his talk is meant to show how. It is still an open question in his mind whether the IoT is beneficial or not. But the "deep trouble" that we are in from IoT can be mitigated to some extent by copyleft licenses that are "regularly and fairly enforced". Copyleft is not the solution to all of the problems, all of the time—no idea, no matter how great, can be—but it can help with the dangers of IoT. That is what he hoped to convince attendees with his talk. A joke that he had seen at least three times at the conference (and certainly before that as well) is that the "S" in IoT stands for security. As everyone knows by now, the IoT is not about security. He pointed to some recent incidents, including IoT baby monitors that were compromised by attackers in order to verbally threaten the parents. This is "scary stuff", he said.