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Microsoft

Windows cheaper to patch than OSS

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

A Microsoft-commissioned study has sparked heated debate by claiming that Windows software is cheaper to patch than open-source alternatives.

M$ Sued Over Excel Data-Linking

Filed under
Microsoft
Legal

Microsoft Corp. illegally took technology used to link spreadsheet data between two of its programs from a Guatemalan inventor, lawyers said during opening statements at a jury trial that started on Tuesday.

Windows vs. Linux: An Unbiased Review

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Humor

After hearing all of the hype about Linux, I decided to give it a try. That was my first mistake. I soon realized that Linux has more flavors than you can shake a stick at.

I asked a computer savvy friend which was best, and he chuckled and said "Try OpenBSD." He told me that "OpenBSD is the most secure operating system that civilians can legally use," so I decided to install it and see how it compared with Windows.

How Linux Could Overthrow M$

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Rather than remaking itself, Microsoft is using legal threats, short-term deals, and fear, uncertainty, and doubt to fortify its position. But this strategy probably won't work. The Linux operating system and the open-source model for software development are far from perfect, but they look increasingly likely to depose Microsoft.

Sheep to be Sheared

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

And now for the sad part. You...Windows users, are going to follow the good shepherd Bill Gates and let him lead you to the shearing house. It's not wool he's shearing from you folks...it's your money.

M$ Battles Halo 2 Holes

Filed under
Microsoft
Security
Gaming

Microsoft is once again locked in a battle of wills with hackers determined to find and exploit security holes in the company's software. But this time the buggy code isn't endangering users' PCs -- just their otherworldly alien fortresses.

Speculating on RH and M$

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

CNET reported last week that Red Hat CEO Matthew Szulik and Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer met for lunch in New York. That’s something like Michael Moore and Rush Limbaugh chowing down together — you just wouldn’t expect it to happen. I wonder if the waiters were asked to sign NDAs?

Why Wait for Eiger When Linux is Ready Today

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Well, well, well. Microsoft has decided to offer a thin desktop operating system in the United States after all. Could it be that the Linux desktop, with some help from the low-cost Mac Mini, is finally making the boys from Redmond sweat?

Faulty M$ Update Rekindles Patch Quality Concerns

Filed under
Microsoft

Problems have been caused by M$'s recent "critical" update and hotfixes have been offered to provide temporary respite. "A hotfix for a patch? I hope it works properly, or what's next? A hotmend for the hotfix for the patch?"

M$ OneCare gets a bashing

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft's plans to charge for its security service has annoyed users. "Am I just being cynical or does this sound like a way to make money rather than fix the product?"

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Spaceman Shuttleworth Finds Earthly Riches With Ubuntu Software

He’s best known for being the world’s first “Afronaut,” but since returning to Earth from his 2002 trip on Russia’s Soyuz TM-34 rocket ship, Cape Town native Mark Shuttleworth set about with the conquest of a much more lucrative universe: the internet-of-things. Shuttleworth created Ubuntu, an open-source Linux operating system that helps connect everything from drones to thermostats to the internet. His company, Canonical Group Ltd., makes money from about 800 paying customers, including Netflix Inc., Tesla Inc. and Deutsche Telekom AG, which pay for support services. Its success has helped boost his net worth to $1 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index. “It’s destructive to be too focused on that,” Shuttleworth said of his wealth in an interview at Bloomberg’s office in Boston. “It’s just a distraction from whether you have your finger on the pulse of what’s next.” Read more Also:

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    The Silph Road is the premier grassroots network for Pokémon GO players around the world offering research, tools, and resources to the largest Pokémon GO community worldwide, with up to 400,000 visitors per day Operating a volunteer-run, community network with up to 400,000 daily visitors is no easy task especially in the face of massive and unpredictable demand spikes, and with developers spread all over the world.With massive user demand and with volunteer developers located all over the world, The Silph Road’s operations must be cost-effective, flexible, and scalable. This led the Pokémon GO network first to cloud, and then to containers and in both cases Canonical ’s technology was the answer.