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Microsoft

Munich to Assess Cost of Vista 10 (Spyware). But Not Leaving GNU/Linux Yet

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  • Linux's Munich crisis: Crunch vote locks city on course for Windows return

    However, Matthias Kirschner, president of the Free Software Foundation Europe said: "They have now stepped back a little bit because so many people were watching, but on the other hand it's very clear what they want."

  • Why Munich made the switch from Windows to Linux—and may be reversing course
  • The Document Foundation: Munich Returning to Windows and Office a Step Backwards

    The City of Munich, which has long been considered a pioneer of the transition from Windows to Linux, is now exploring ways to return to Microsoft’s solutions, with a proposal to move all computers to Windows 10 and Microsoft Office to be discussed today.

  • Linux Pioneer Munich Makes Huge Step Towards Returning to Windows [Ed: Microsoft's propagandist Bogdan Popa still lobbying against GNU/Linux in Munich]

    The City of Munich will explore ways to move to Windows 10 by 2020, as part of a historic vote that could represent a major step towards the demise of its own Linux-based LiMux.

  • Munich City Government to Dump Linux Desktop [Ed: This headline is a lie, it's anything but confirmed]
  • Microsoft does not love Linux in Munich

    The city of Munich, which moved its systems to Linux many years ago, is now thinking of moving back to Windows 10, following the arrival of a mayor who got Microsoft to move its German corporate headquarters to Munich.

    The city council voted on Wednesday to create a draft plan outlining the costs involved in moving back to Windows. If the plan gets the green light, then the return to Windows could take place by the end of 2020.

  • Linux champion Munich takes decisive step towards returning to Windows

    At the time Munich began the move to LiMux in 2004, it was one of the largest organizations to reject Windows, and Microsoft took the city's leaving so seriously that its then CEO Steve Ballmer flew to Munich, but the mayor at the time, Christian Ude, stood firm.

    More recently, Microsoft last year moved its German company headquarters to Munich, and now, less than four years after the migration of some 15,000 staff to LiMux was completed, the city has taken a decisive step towards swapping the Linux-based OS for Windows—whose use has been reduced to a minimum in the city.

Stay with Free Software, City of Munich!

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LibO
Linux
Microsoft

The city of Munich is currently considering a move away from Free Software back to Microsoft products. We consider this to be a mistake and urge the decision makers to reconsider.

For many years now the City of Munich has been using a mix of software by KDE, LibreOffice and Ubuntu, among others. Mayor Dieter Reiter (a self-proclaimed Microsoft-fan who helped Microsoft move offices to Munich) asked Accenture (a Microsoft partner) to produce a report about the situation of the City of Munich's IT infrastructure. That resulted in a 450-page document. This report is now being misused to push for a move away from Free Software. However the main issues listed in the report were identified to be organizational ones and not related to Free Software operating systems and applications.

[...]

The City of Munich has always been a poster child of Free Software in public administrations. It is a showcase of what can be done with Free Software in this setting. The step back by the City of Munich from Free Software would therefore not just be a blow for this particular deployment but also have more far-reaching effects into other similar deployments.

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Microsoft-Friendly Media Prematurely Announces Death of GNU/Linux (Old Tactics) to Market Vista 10

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Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft loves Linux. But not Skype for Linux

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Microsoft

First, let me make it plain that if Microsoft had decided to junk Skype for Linux at the time when it decided to redesign the client, I would have no complaint. A commercial company is free to produce what software it wants and drop whatever does not net it a return.

When Linux users were critical of the alpha client in its early days, I took up cudgels on behalf of Microsoft, something I rarely do.

But after deciding to keep offering a client for Linux, it should not be left at this very basic stage. Is it too much to ask that after six months, one does not have to input one's credentials every third time one starts up the client?

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Openwashing and Microsoft Attacks on GNU/Linux

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Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft 'Loves' Linux in Munich

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Linux
Microsoft

The Forces Of Evil Still Try To Shut Down LiMux

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

It’s hard to believe but a dozen years after the decision was made to migrate to GNU/Linux for the IT system of Munich, the dark forces are still trying to reverse the decision. Now, there is a plan afoot to make a plan to reverse the decision four years from now. I kid you not. Will these jokers still be in power then? The next federal election is next year… The next election in Munich is 2020…

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Microsoft Openwashing

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Microsoft

SnapRoute Now Connected to Surveillance Giants AT&T and Microsoft

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Microsoft

From vs. to + for Microsoft and Linux

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Linux
Microsoft
Legal

In November 2016, Microsoft became a platinum member of the Linux Foundation, the primary sponsor of top-drawer Linux talent (including Linus), as well as a leading organizer of Linux conferences and source of Linux news.

Does it matter that Microsoft has a long history of fighting Linux with patent claims? Seems it should. Run a Google search for "microsoft linux patents", and you'll get almost a half-million results, most of which raise questions. Is Microsoft now ready to settle or drop claims? Is this about keeping your friends close and your enemies closer? Is it just a seat at a table it can't hurt Microsoft to sit at?

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Leftovers: Software and OSS

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    Portable apps are great invention that not many people talk about. The ability to take any program to any PC, and continue using it is very handy. This is especially true for those that need to get work done, and don’t have anything with you but a flash drive. In this article, we’ll go over some of the best portable Linux apps to take with you. From secure internet browsing, to eBooks, graphic editing and even voice chat! Note: a lot of the portable apps in this article are traditional apps made portable thanks to AppImage technology. AppImage makes it possible to run an app instantly, from anywhere without the need to install. Learn more here.
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  • Gammu 1.38.2
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    As an Agile leader, you learn in at least two ways: observing and measuring what happens in the organization (I have any number of posts about qualitative and quantitative measurement); and just as importantly, you learn by thinking, discussing with others, and working with others. The people in the organization learn in these ways, too.
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    Leave it to technology to take an everyday word (especially in the English language) and give it a whole new meaning. Words such as the web, viral, text, cloud, apple, java, spam, server, and tablets come to mind as great examples of how the general public's understanding of the meaning of a word can change in a relatively short amount of time. Hence, this article is about a turtle and a cat who have changed the lives of many people over the years, including mine.

Linux and FOSS Events

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    As the open source community continues to grow, Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of The Linux Foundation, says the Foundation’s goal remains the same: to create a sustainable ecosystem for open source technology through good governance and innovation.
  • Open Source for Science + Innovation
    We are bringing together open source and open science specialists to talk about the “how and why” of open source and open science. Members of these communities will give brief talks which are followed by open and lively discussions open to the audience. Talks will highlight the role of openness in stimulating innovation but may also touch upon how openness appears to some to conflict with intellectual property interests.
  • Announcing the Equal Rating Innovation Challenge Winners
    Six months ago, we created the Equal Rating Innovation Challenge to add an additional dimension to the important work Mozilla has been leading around the concept of “Equal Rating.” In addition to policy and research, we wanted to push the boundaries and find news ways to provide affordable access to the Internet while preserving net neutrality. An open call for new ideas was the ideal vehicle.