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Microsoft

Ubuntu may beat Windows 10 to phone-PC convergence after all

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Despite the recent announcement that Windows 10 phones will be able to be used as PCs when connected to an external monitor, Ubuntu—the first operating system to toy with the idea—hasn’t conceded the smartphone-PC convergence race to Microsoft just yet.

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Also: Windows 10 or Ubuntu: Which will be the one OS to rule them all?

Microsoft's new secure boot strategy will suit Linux firms

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Linux companies Red Hat, SUSE and Canonical will benefit from the decision by Microsoft to suggest that OEMs not provide a means of turning off secure boot on PCs running Windows 10.

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Linux vs Windows: What do people want from their next computer?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

The Gnome desktop version can also be made to look stunning too, so users shouldn’t think that choosing Linux will make things ugly or clunky, as this is not the case.

In conclusion, Windows adding a Start button, which the company axed two years ago, and multiple desktops (a long established Linux feature) will not make the transition and subsequent day-to-day usage much less frustrating than the Windows 8 experience.

However, one of the main downsides about the Linux operating system is that by being free, this means that there is no huge marketing budget to get the message out.

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Microsoft & Education: The Song Remains the Same

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Microsoft

One of our hardware donors emailed me and asked if I would come to Austin and pick up a dozen Optiplex 745s with 17 inch monitors and accompanying keyboards. These Dells already had scrubbed drives and had either 4 or 8 GB of RAM, depending on what they were originally assigned to do. I said I most certainly would and arranged a time to be there. This donor has been especially generous to us, and not with just decent hardware. They also present us an annual Christmas cash donation of $1000. On the years they do employee matching, it is more than that — a lot more.

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M$’s Client Division Sinks Slowly Into The West

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Microsoft

As expected, M$’s client division is doing poorly.

The drop was huge, though, meaning they’ve been diversifying sufficiently rapidly just to keep some growth on the bottom line. One wonders how bad it would have been if not for support from Android/Linux…

See? There’s a reason this is The Year Of GNU/Linux on the Desktop. That other OS has dropped out.

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Intel Compute Stick now available: $149 for Windows version, $110 for Linux

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

The concept of a "PC stick" -- a processor and RAM embedded into a gum-pack-sized device that can connect to your HDTV via an HDMI connection -- is nothing new, but when a company like Intel embraces the concept, a lot more people start paying attention.

That was the case at CES back in January, when Intel showed off the Compute Stick, its version of a teeny-tiny PC that includes a quad-core Atom processor and -- depending on whether you want the Windows 8.1 or Linux edition -- comes with up to 2GB of RAM and up to 32GB of onboard storage. All of this fits onto something with dimensions of just 4.1x1.5x0.5 inches.

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Can Microsoft Really Rival Linux?

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Why the high numbers for Linux? Linux is more stable. Linux servers have been known to run without failure for several years. That’s because Linux handles multitasking and process management better than Windows. That is debatable on the mobile area since many cheap Android (a Linux descendant) devices often freeze. Linux is also more secure since it’s built as a multiuser operating system from the ground up. It is better at sandboxing or containing applications and processes from the root system than Windows does. Linux servers are also minimal targets of hackers and malware, though not exactly a guarantee but it’s something to take advantage of. As for hardware requirements, Linux can be run on most computers. Depending on the distribution, Linux can run very smoothly on ten-year old computers. Lastly, all Linux distributions are free though some versions for the enterprise, like Red Hat, offer technical support for a fee.

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XPQ4 Theme Pack Provides Uncanny Resemblance with Windows OS

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux
Microsoft

XPQ4 is a funky open source theme that aims to provide Linux users with the look and feel of a Windows desktop. It might seem weird at first, but this is probably one of the most advanced solutions available right now.

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Also: Evolving KDE

Windows Users Download Ubuntu 30,000 Times a Day and Other Cool Facts

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Ubuntu is the most used Linux desktop operating system, but that might not be all that transparent, so we would also like to present some interesting figures, like the number of Windows users that download Ubuntu every day.

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Why It Doesn't Matter for Linux If Windows Becomes Open Source

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

The power of the Linux platform doesn't reside in the fact that it's open source, although it does play an important part. It's all about the community of developers who want to make things better, and most of the time they don't want anything in return, other than recognition for their work. This is not something that you see in the Windows dev community that aims to make money.

Also, Linux is a great platform because there are hundreds of distros out there. Some might think this is a weakness, but it's not. Great ideas found and implemented in one project will eventually land in all the others. Innovation is encouraged and often recognized by most of the other developers.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

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    OpenVZ, a long-standing Linux virtualization technology and similar to LXC and Solaris Containers, is out with their major 7.0 release. OpenVZ 7.0 has focused on merging the OpenVZ and Virtuozzo code-bases along with replacing their own hypervisor with that of Linux's KVM. Under OpenVZ 7.0, it has become a complete Linux distribution based upon VzLinux.
  • OpenVZ 7.0 released
    I’m pleased to announce the release of OpenVZ 7.0. The new release focuses on merging OpenVZ and Virtuozzo source codebase, replacing our own hypervisor with KVM.
  • Announcing git-cinnabar 0.4.0 beta 2
    Git-cinnabar is a git remote helper to interact with mercurial repositories. It allows to clone, pull and push from/to mercurial remote repositories, using git.
  • FreeIPA Lightweight CA internals
    In the preceding post, I explained the use cases for the FreeIPA lightweight sub-CAs feature, how to manage CAs and use them to issue certificates, and current limitations. In this post I detail some of the internals of how the feature works, including how signing keys are distributed to replicas, and how sub-CA certificate renewal works. I conclude with a brief retrospective on delivering the feature.
  • Lightweight Sub-CAs in FreeIPA 4.4
    Last year FreeIPA 4.2 brought us some great new certificate management features, including custom certificate profiles and user certificates. The upcoming FreeIPA 4.4 release builds upon this groundwork and introduces lightweight sub-CAs, a feature that lets admins to mint new CAs under the main FreeIPA CA and allows certificates for different purposes to be issued in different certificate domains. In this post I will review the use cases and demonstrate the process of creating, managing and issuing certificates from sub-CAs. (A follow-up post will detail some of the mechanisms that operate behind the scenes to make the feature work.)
  • RcppArmadillo 0.7.200.2.0
    The second Armadillo release of the 7.* series came out a few weeks ago: version 7.200.2. And RcppArmadillo version 0.7.200.2.0 is now on CRAN and uploaded to Debian. This followed the usual thorough reverse-dependecy checking of by now over 240 packages using it. For once, I let it simmer a little preparing only a package update via the GitHub repo without preparing a CRAN upload to lower the update frequency a little. Seeing that Conrad has started to release 7.300.0 tarballs, the time for a (final) 7.200.2 upload was now right. Just like the previous, it now requires a recent enough compiler. As g++ is so common, we explicitly test for version 4.6 or newer. So if you happen to be on an older RHEL or CentOS release, you may need to get yourself a more modern compiler. R on Windows is now at 4.9.3 which is decent (yet stable) choice; the 4.8 series of g++ will also do. For reference, the current LTS of Ubuntu is at 5.4.0, and we have g++ 6.1 available in Debian testing.

Red Hat and Fedora

Leftovers: Debian

  • Debian LGBTIQA+
    I have a long overdue blog entry about what happened in recent times. People that follow my tweets did catch some things. Most noteworthy there was the Trans*Inter*Congress in Munich at the start of May. It was an absolute blast. I met so many nice and great people, talked and experienced so many great things there that I'm still having a great motivational push from it every time I think back. It was also the time when I realized that I in fact do have body dysphoria even though I thought I'm fine with my body in general: Being tall is a huge issue for me. Realizing that I have a huge issue (yes, pun intended) with my length was quite relieving, even though it doesn't make it go away. It's something that makes passing and transitioning for me harder. I'm well aware that there are tall women, and that there are dedicated shops for lengthy women, but that's not the only thing that I have trouble with. What bothers me most is what people read into tall people: that they are always someone they can lean on for comfort, that tall people are always considered to be self confident and standing up for themselves (another pun, I know ... my bad).
  • [GSOC] Week 8&9 Report
    This particular week has been tiresome as I did catch a cold ;). I did come back from Cape Town where debconf taking place. My arrival at Montreal was in the middle of the week, so this week is not plenty of news…
  • Debian on Jetson TK1
    I became interested in running Debian on NVIDIA's Tegra platform recently. NVIDIA is doing a great job getting support for Tegra upstream (u-boot, kernel, X.org and other projects). As part of ensuring good Debian support for Tegra, I wanted to install Debian on a Jetson TK1, a development board from NVIDIA based on the Tegra K1 chip (Tegra 124), a 32-bit ARM chip.
  • RC bugs 2016/01-29

Android Leftovers