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Microsoft

Linux, not Microsoft, the real winner of Windows Server on ARM

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Linux
Microsoft

Cutting to the heart of it, it doesn't actually matter if Microsoft releases Windows Server for ARM. Windows isn't the future and even Microsoft knows it. The upcoming availability of SQL server on Linux is all the proof we need that the game is over and, in the data centre at least, Microsoft didn't win.

Quite frankly, there's nothing wrong with that. Legacy x86 Windows applications have been a millstone around the neck of the entire industry for ages now and its long past time they were relegated to a niche and left to quietly slip away into the night. What's interesting here isn't that Microsoft managed to take its existing code base, strip out some of the cruft and compile it on ARM. What's interesting is what Microsoft's experiment unlocks outside the Windows ecosystem.

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Microsoft Signals Time to Move to GNU/Linux

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Microsoft

Accenture, Microsoft Proxy

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Row over 'very limited' Linux PCs escalates in Munich [Ed: Microsoft and Accenture working together to undermine GNU/Linux and 'make an example' or send out a warning]

    With the controversy now escalating into a very public debate, it's currently unknown which operating system Munich will be using for the next decade. Linux is currently deployed on 20,000 computers across the city. Converting them all back to Windows will take months of further work.

    While it's attracted the most attention, Munich isn't the only city to have shunned Windows in favour of open-source software. Last September, Moscow abandoned Microsoft's Outlook email program in favour of its own system. Concerns about the use of proprietary software in government departments have also been raised across the world, including in the UK where a long-running but slowly progressing campaign is encouraging Linux usage

  • Accenture and Docker Team on Container Services

    Accenture has expanded its relationship with Docker to enhance its existing multicloud Container as a Service solutions. The company will leverage Docker Datacenter to provide enterprises with the capabilities needed to secure the software supply chain, expand workload portability, and improve application resilience.

Kernel and Drivers

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
  • Kernel 4.10 gives Linux support for AMD Ryzen multithreading

    With the release of its Ryzen 7 series CPUs, AMD came out swinging at Intel’s high-end Core i7 line. As I noted in a previous column, version 4.10 of the Linux kernel corrects an issue that kept Intel CPUs from reaching their turbo speeds, but there’s also something in the new kernel for Team Red.

  • Linus Torvalds explains how to Pull without jerking his chain

    Linux kernel developers have again given Linus Torvalds cause for complaint.

    The Linux Lord felt the need to take to the Linux Kernel Mailing List late last week to tell a chap called Wolfram Sang that “If you cannot explain a reason for a merge or be bothered to try to write a commit message, you shouldn't be doing that merge. It really is that simple.”

  • Microsoft admits mistake, pulls problematic Windows 10 driver

    The driver, listed as "Microsoft -- WPD -- 2/22/2016 12:00:00 AM -- 5.2.5326.4762," wasn’t accompanied by any details, although we knew from the name that it related to Windows Portable Devices and affected users who had phones and tablets connected to the OS.

    While the driver was an optional update for Windows 7 and 8.1 users, it was installed automatically for those on Windows 10.

Munich Strikes Back at Microsoft's Dirty Tricks and Lobbying

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • There's a Munich disagreement over Open source

    Moves by German politicians to undo Munich’s decade experiment in open source are unnecessary, according to the bloke in charge of the project.

    There are moves to replace the Linux based systems at Munich after a decade of it being the poster-child for open sauce operating systems. Munich's ruling SPD-CSU coalition is apparently a fan of phasing out the use of open-source software.

    Last month, the general council backed a proposal that the administration should investigate how long it will take and how much it will cost to build a Windows 10 client. Once it has that information the council will vote to replace LiMux the custom version of Ubuntu which the council has been developing.

  • Munich IT chief slams city's decision to dump Linux for Windows

    THE HEAD OF IT at the City of Munich's IT services provider [email protected], Karl-Heinz Schneider, has claimed that there are no "compelling technical reasons" for the authority to order a migration back to Windows.

    Last month, Munich voted to investigate the viability of creating a Windows 10 client, thus ending its multi-million euro, nine-year experiment in running the municipality on Linux.

    Schneider, who heads up the company responsible for Munich's desktop Linux implementation, has spoken out about the move during an interview with German IT publication Heise.de.

  • Munich's desktop Linux was 'working fine' before politicians decreed return to Windows

    Speaking to German IT publication Heise.de, Schneider claimed that he was surprised by the move, adding that any compatibility problems that the City had initially encountered had been fixed.

Microsoft and Openwashing, 'Success' Stories

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Microsoft
  • OCP Launches Marketplace for Open Source Data Center Hardware
  • Microsoft embraces open source innovation for data centres at OCP 2017 [Ed: This has nothing to do with "open source"; pure openwashing from Microsoft]
  • Microsoft: Users Locked Out of Accounts Tuesday

    Microsoft Corp. (MSFT) was hit with an outage early Tuesday morning that prevented users from accessing a host of applications and services including Xbox, Skype and Outlook. Many Microsoft customers in Western Europe and the Eastern U.S. were greeted with a message that their account wasn’t active when they tried to log on.

    Users complaining at website DownDector.com about Outlook.com reached in the thousands, reported Reuters. Meanwhile the hashtag #hotmail was trending on Twitter in the U.K. Microsoft confirmed the problem, saying in an Xbox Live message it was working to resolve the issues as quickly as possible. Microsoft Account Services, which also includes Office 365, the Windows Store and a host of other apps came back up around 9:30 a.m. EST Tuesday at which time Microsoft alerted users.

  • Microsoft is putting OneDrive ads in Windows 10’s File Explorer

    Microsoft has made a bad habit of introducing ads here and there throughout Windows, and now people are starting to notice them showing up in another spot: inside File Explorer.

    People have reported seeing notifications to sign up for OneDrive — Microsoft’s cloud storage service — at the top of the Quick Access screen that comes up when you open a new File Explorer window.

Linux in Munich: 'No compelling technical reason to return to Windows,' says city's IT chief

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

The man who runs Munich's central IT says there is no practical reason for the city to write off millions of euros and years of work to ditch its Linux-based OS for Windows.

The city authority is widely expected to swap Linux for Windows, due to a desire to drop open-source software at the council among Munich's ruling SPD-CSU coalition.

Last month, the general council backed a proposal that the administration should investigate how long it will take and how much it will cost to build a Windows 10 client. Once the details are known, the council will vote on whether Windows should replace LiMux, a custom version of the Ubuntu OS that is used by more than 15,000 staff across the council. The changeover would take place by 2021.

But now the man in charge of Munich's central IT provider, IT@M, has said there is no technical reason to switch back to Windows, describing the decision to prepare to return as being in some ways "surprising".

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Proprietary Software Traps

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Microsoft
Software
  • Using proprietary services to develop open source software [Ed: never a good idea. Microsoft attempts to lock in FOSS developers this way.]

    It is now pretty well accepted that open source is a superior way of producing software. Almost everyone is doing open source these days. In particular, the ability for users to look under the hood and make changes results in tools that are better adapted to their workflows. It reduces the cost and risk of finding yourself locked in with a vendor in an unbalanced relationship. It contributes to a virtuous circle of continuous improvement, blurring the lines between consumers and producers. It enables everyone to remix and invent new things. It adds up to the common human knowledge.

  • Why doesn't Microsoft just give up on Skype for Linux? [Ed: because Microsoft wants to spy on (record) everyone?]

    Microsoft released a beta client of Skype for Linux last week but even basic problems with the alpha client — which was around much longer than an alpha client should be — still appear to be dogging the software.

    Every time a new release takes place, I give it a twirl to see what, if anything, has changed.

  • What's new in the Skype for Linux beta
  • Skype Lite Gets Brings Kannada Language Support, Skype for Linux Moves to Beta
  • Spotify on Fedora 25 using Flatpak

    Spotify is a great application where the web version just isn't as useful as the Desktop app. Spotify has a debian installer and no support for rpm distros, typically we'd be SOL on Fedora. But with flatpak it's easy to install Spotify on platforms like Fedora, CentOS, Ubuntu, etc without deb or rpm!

Microsoft Versus GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Europe-wide interest in Munich desktop debate

    In the days leading up to the vote, the city received a record-breaking number of comments, one city councillor noted. A handful of activists attended the city hall meeting, and an alliance of German and international free and open source organisations questioned the city's plans in an open letter.

    In a statement, the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) says that the door is still open, “although the mandate is highly suggestive, in that it suggests that the existing vendor-neutral approach is to be replaced with a proprietary solution.” The advocacy group says it will continue to campaign: “The vendor-neutral strategy must prevail.”

  • Microsoft open source efforts draw praise [Ed: This article is a lie, based on selective quotes. Microsoft is attacking FOSS using patents and recall what happens in Munich.]

What Microsoft Did in Munich

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • What happened in Munich [iophk: "Microsoft fifth columnists inside .de government"]

    What lead to this public hearing on 15 February? In 2014, Dieter Reiter was elected new mayor of Munich. He had referred to himself as "Microsoft fan" even before he took office. He prides himself with having played a major part in the decision to move the Microsoft Germany headquarters to downtown Munich. He started to question the LiMux strategy as soon as his term started, and asked Accenture, a Microsoft partner in the same building as Microsoft, to analyse Munich's IT infrastructure. The report can be found here (German). It's noteworthy that in their report, the analysts identify primarily organisational issues at the root of the problems troubling LiMux uptake, rather than technical challenges.

  • FSFE: What happened in Munich [Ed: Microsoft played dirty]

    On 15 February 2017, the city council of Munich, Germany convened to discuss the future of their LiMux project. In its public session, the plenary voted to have the city administration develop a strategy to unify client-side IT architecture, building atop a yet-to-be-developed "Windows-Basis-Client". A translation of the complete decision is included further down.

    The opposing parties were overruled, but the decision was amended such that the strategy document must specify which LiMux-applications will no longer be needed, the extent in which prior investments must be written off, and a rough calculation of the overall costs of the desired unification.

    Since this decision was reached, the majority of media have reported that a final call was made to halt LiMux and switch back to Microsoft software. This is, however, not an accurate representation of the outcome of the city council meeting. We studied the available documentation and our impression is that the last word has not been spoken.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Firefox 58.0, Paying it forward, Firefox Nightly, Lantea Maps

  • Firefox 58.0 “Quantum” Arrives With Faster Page Load Speeds And Code Compilation
    In November 2017, Mozilla launched its Firefox 57 web browser that was also called Firefox Quantum. It was hailed as a strong competitor to powerful Chrome web browser and we conducted a comparison of both browsers to give you a better idea. But, the story doesn’t end here; Mozilla is continuing to improve its work to deliver better performance with each release.
  • Paying it forward at Global Diversity CFP Day
    A CFP is a “Call for Papers” or “Call for Proposals” – many technical and academic conferences discover and vet speakers and their talk topics through an open, deadline-driven, online proposal submission process. This CFP process provides a chance for anyone to pitch a talk and pitch themselves as the presenter. Submitting a CFP, and having your proposal accepted, is one great way to get a foot in the door if you’re just getting started as a new speaker. And, for some developers, public speaking can be the door to many types of opportunity.
  • Firefox Nightly
    Creating a Gnome Dock launcher and a terminal command for Firefox Nightly About 18 months ago, Wil Clouser wrote a blog post on the very blog titled Getting Firefox Nightly to stick to Ubuntu’s Unity Dock. Fast forward to 2018, Ubuntu announced last year that it is giving up on their Unity desktop and will use Gnome Shell instead. Indeed, the last Ubuntu 17.10 release uses Gnome Shell by default. That means that the article above is slightly outdated now as its .desktop file was targeting the Unity environment which had its own quirks.
  • Lantea Maps Updates to Track Saving and Drawing
    After my last post on Lantea Maps (my web app to record GPS tracks), I started working on some improvements to its code. First, I created a new backend for storing GPS tracks on my servers and integrated it into the web app. You need to log in via my own OAuth2 server, and then you can upload tracks fairly seamlessly and nicely. The UI for uploading is now also fully integrated into the track "drawer" which should make uploading tracks a smoother experience than previously. And as a helpful feature for people who use Lantea Maps on multiple devices, a device name can be configured via the settings "drawer".

Red Hat and Fedora

Perl Advocacy

  • My DeLorean runs Perl
    My signature hobby project these days is a computerized instrument cluster for my car, which happens to be a DeLorean. But, whenever I show it to someone, I usually have to give them a while to marvel at the car before they even notice that there's a computer screen in the dashboard. There's a similar problem when I start describing the software; programmers immediately get hung up on "Why Perl???" when they learn that the real-time OpenGL rendering of instrument data is all coded in Perl. So, any discussion of my project usually starts with the history of the DeLorean or a discussion of the merits of Perl vs. other, more-likely tools.
  • An overview of the Perl 5 engine
    As I described in "My DeLorean runs Perl," switching to Perl has vastly improved my development speed and possibilities. Here I'll dive deeper into the design of Perl 5 to discuss aspects important to systems programming.

FOSS Linux App Development In Decline, Canonical Promotes Snap Using Proprietary Software

  • Is Native Linux App Development In Decline?
    A blog like mine thrives, in part, on there being a steady supply of good quality native Linux apps to write about. We do news too of course, and tutorials, how tos, lists, eye candy, and even the odd opinion piece (like this post). But I know you like reading about new and updated Linux apps, and, to be fair, I like writing about them. And yet… Where have all the Linux apps gone? Bear with me as what follows is more of a ramble than a coherent essay. For background, I’m writing this on day four of an enthusiasm drought.
  • Slack launches on Linux
  • Slack gets the Linux treatment: New snap available for Mint, Ubuntu, Debian, and more
    Slack is now available as a snap, which means Linux users can take advantage of the workplace collaboration platform, Canonical announced last week. Slack has recently debuted a number of features that make it more appealing to businesses, including Shared Channels and Private Shared Channels, which allow employees from different companies to work together on projects in private if they so choose. With more than 9 million weekly active users, Slack has gained a lot of traction in the enterprise, as noted by our sister site ZDNet. Back in October 2017, Linux overtook MacOS for the first time in terms of global operating system market share—which means the move opens up even more users to the Slack platform.
  • Canonical slaps Slack snap onto stack
    As the ‘company behind’ Ubuntu, Canonical has brought forward the first iteration of Slack as a snap on its software platform. Slack is a cloud-based set of proprietary team collaboration tools and services that go some way beyond core ‘messaging’ functionality into areas including project management.