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Microsoft

Wine 1.9.7

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Embrace and Extend: Microsoft and Bash

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GNU
Microsoft

Linux alternatives to Windows XP

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft, sometime ago decided to end support for older versions of Windows such as Windows XP. No more technical support and security updates for these versions in future signalled Microsoft’s intentions to encourage users to migrate to the latest version of Windows. Lets face it, there are several users who are still on Windows XP – especially in the developing parts of the world. While upgrading Windows XP to Windows 10 seems to be the logical step, users who unwilling or unable to pay can migrate to a free operating system based on Linux.

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Rumour that Microsoft considers purchasing Canonical

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Microsoft
Ubuntu

Does Microsoft Love Linux As Much As It Hates Oracle SQL Databases?

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Given the long wait, the SQL Server 2016 support for Linux servers seems to reflect a business tactic more than any actual love on Microsoft's part for the open source community.

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Microsoft Openwashing

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Microsoft

Wine 1.9.6 Better Detects GPUs Using Mesa Drivers

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Microsoft
Software

Wine 1.9.6 was released this morning as the latest bi-weekly development release of Wine.

Most prominent to Wine 1.9.6 is now that it better detects graphics cards using the Mesa drivers. There is also more support for Shader Model 5, C++ exception handling improvements, and a total of 32 known bug fixes. Shader Model 5.0 is what's needed by DirectX 11 support.

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Also: Wine 1.9.6 Is Out with Better Video Card Detection, Shader Model 5 Support

5 reasons Microsoft may never give up on Linux patent claims

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Linux
Microsoft
Legal

There are many reasons why Microsoft may not join the Open Innovation Network (OIN) anytime soon. First of all, if a company doesn’t want to use patents as a weapon, it won’t, whether or not it joins OIN.

At the same time, joining OIN doesn’t guarantee that a company won't use patents as a weapon. Both Oracle and Google are OIN members and they have locked horns in one of the fieriest battles in the open source world. IBM is one of the founders of OIN and it has also sued companies (like Groupon) over various patents.

So as much as I believe joining OIN sends a positive message, I don’t think that’s _the_ ultimate solution.

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Also: Microsoft's Linux Inquisitor Grand Master is off to Spotify

The one thing Microsoft must do - but won't - to gain open-source trust

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Microsoft
OSS

So, why are people still paying up rather than fighting? Because patent litigation is incredibly expensive. It's cheaper to pay a $5 to $15 per device licensing fee than to pay a small fortune and take even a remote chance of failure in court.

And Microsoft? Come on, back in 2014, Microsoft was already making about $3.4 billion from its Android patents. Samsung alone paid Microsoft a billion bucks to license its Android patents. This is serious money even by Fortune 500 standards.

In its last quarter, between volume licensing and patents, Microsoft accounted for approximately 9 percent of Microsoft's total revenue.

And, that, of course, is why Microsoft is never going to stop charging for its Android patents. So long as the boys from Redmond can milk these patents for billions every year, they're going to keep them.

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More in Tux Machines

Eight great Linux gifts for the holiday season

Do you want to give your techie friend a very Linux holiday season? Sure you do! Here are some suggestion to brighten your favorite Tux fan's day. Read more Also: More Random Gift Ideas For Linux Enthusiasts & Others Into Tech Which open source gift is at the top of your holiday wish list?

Ubuntu-Based ExTiX OS Updated for Intel Compute Sticks with Improved Installer

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton announced this past weekend the release of an updated build of his Ubuntu-based ExTiX Linux distribution for Intel Compute Stick devices. Last month, we reported on the initial availability of a port of the ExTiX operating system for Intel Compute Sticks, boasting the lightweight and modern LXQt 0.10.0 desktop environment and powered by the latest Linux 4.8 kernel, tweaked by Arne Exton for Intel Atom processors. And now, ExTiX Build 161203 is out as a drop-in replacement for Build 161119, bringing a much-improved Ubiquity graphics installer that should no longer crash, as several users who attempted to install the Ubuntu-based GNU/Linux distro on their Intel Compute Stick devices reported. Read more Also: Debian-Based SparkyLinux 4.5 Brings Support for exFAT Filesystems, systemd 232 4MLinux 20.1 Linux Distro Released with Kernel 4.4.34 LTS to Restore PAE Support

Today in Techrights

Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.23 Snap Creator for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and 16.10

Canonical's Snappy development team have released a new maintenance version of the Snapcraft 2.x tool that lets applications developers package their apps as Snap packages for Ubuntu and other GNU/Linux distributions that support Snaps. Read more