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Microsoft

If the birthmark fits, Microsoft will wear it

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Microsoft

blogs.zdnet.com: As we approach Wednesday’s announcement on the ISO decision concerning Office Open XML, the format for Microsoft Word, it’s becoming increasingly apparent that the process has been, well, Gorbachevian.

Also: *Is Microsoft really any more trustworthy?
* Microsoft Isn't Credible About Open Source
* When is a Standard Not a Standard?

Hackers "open source" Vista

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Microsoft

blogs.pcworld.co.nz: Microsoft reacted swiftly this morning to close down a site distributing the complete source code of its flagship Vista operating system -- but not before dozens of other sites had mirrored the code.

Microsoft's Great Besmirching

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Microsoft

linuxjournal.com: I have been covering Microsoft for over 25 years - I've even written a few books about Windows. During that time, I've developed a certain respect for a company that just doesn't give up, and whose ability to spin surpasses even that of politicians. It has finally gone further and attacked the system itself; in the process it has destroyed the credibility of the ISO, with serious knock-on consequences for the whole concept of open standards.

Also: As the Linux star rises, it seems the Microsoft star is falling

2007: Microsoft in Review

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Microsoft

nazgum.wordpress: It’s no small secret. I hate Microsoft. I think they are the most vile and corrupt corporation in the tech industry. I have read and heard many people claim Microsoft is changing, improving, and the evil Microsoft of the pass is fading; I strongly disagree.

Microsoft's chickens are coming home to roost

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Microsoft

blogbeebe.blogspot: Microsoft's brand power has been in sharp decline over the past four years, an indication the company is losing credibility and mindshare with U.S. business users, according to a recent study by market research firm CoreBrand.

M$ stuff

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Microsoft
  • All That Got Stolen Was Microsoft's Thunder

  • Microsoft makes final heroic grab for OOXML votes
  • How Microsoft killed ODF
  • Microsoft OOXML standardization bid: The clock is ticking
  • Should Microsoft be afraid of Linux?

Why we still hate Microsoft

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Microsoft

Dana Blankenhorn: I’m not trying to be political here. But what seems to upset most people about Hillary Clinton, and Bill Clinton for that matter, is this habit of parsing. Microsoft also likes to have it both ways. They want to be seen as cooperating with open source, but

Yahoo is the Reason for Microsoft's New Open Source Stance

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Microsoft

ostatic.com: It's not every day that a Microsoft executive as highly placed as senior vice president, corporate secretary and general counsel Brad Smith shows up at an open source conference, but he made an appearance at the Open Source Business Conference in San Francisco this week. What people keep missing is how Microsoft's proposed Yahoo deal would force it to embrace open source.

A Microsoft Slur in the OOXML Saga -- Did I Tell You or Did I Tell You?

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Microsoft

groklaw.net: The New Zealand Open Source Society is reporting that an employee at Microsoft New Zealand recently sent an email to one of the technical bodies advising an NB involved in the OOXML ISO process, smearing a man's reputation, Matthew Holloway, apparently to undermine his technical input which was critical of OOXML.

Microsoft +/vs. Novell: The rich irony of then and now

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Microsoft
SUSE

Matt Asay: There is a tragic (but rich) irony in the news that Microsoft failed in its appeal to throw out Novell's decade-old antitrust lawsuit against it. On one hand, you have Novell arguing (rightly) in court that Microsoft unfairly bullies competitors. On the other hand, we see Novell supping at the feet of Microsoft to revive its Linux business.

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This ends up being a pain in the neck in the x86 world, but it could be much worse. Way back in 2008 I wrote something about why the Linux kernel reports itself to firmware as "Windows" but refuses to identify itself as Linux. The short version is that "Linux" doesn't actually identify the behaviour of the kernel in a meaningful way. "Linux" doesn't tell you whether the kernel can deal with buffers being passed when the spec says it should be a package. "Linux" doesn't tell you whether the OS knows how to deal with an HPET. "Linux" doesn't tell you whether the OS can reinitialise graphics hardware. Read more