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Microsoft

Entrapment by Microsoft GitHub or Censorship by Microsoft

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Microsoft
  • Docker, Perl and GitHub

    There are many reasons to use Docker Images, from setting up a development environment to pushing your code to production. The primary/first reason which pushes me to start using some Docker Images is "Continuous Integration".

    When maintaining a Perl package used by multiple users/companies (or not), you absolutely want to know how your code behaves on different versions of Perl. Even if you could have multiple versions of Perl installed on your development environment, most of the time, the development is only performed using a single version of Perl.

    Continuous Integration system like Travis CI or GitHub Workflows allows you to run your test suite on every push, pull request... without the need of testing manually on all Perl Versions.

    When testing your code on a container (or Virtual Machine) you do not want to install or compile a fresh version of Perl each time... This is a slow operation, that ideally, should be done once.

    This is where Docker Images come to the rescue. They are "snapshots" of a pre-set linux environment.

  • Week notes - 2020 w03 - worklog - Murphy

    Also GitHub decided to revive our anonymous bugs, around 39,000 bugs are back. We haven't yet reactivated our anonymous reporting.

  • Regula adds another element of control to cloud infrastructure as code

    Regula is protected under the GNU Affero General Public License, and, even though it is heavily referenced in the documentation, supposed to work independently from other, commercial Fugue projects.

Entrapment (Microsoft GitHub)

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Microsoft
  • Microsoft's Rust-Based Project Verona Reaches Open Source on GitHub [Ed: Microsoft is openwashing things in its proprietary software platform, GitHub]
  • webcompat.com: Project belt-on.

    So last week, on Friday (Japanese time), I woke up with a website being half disabled and then completely disabled. We had been banned by GitHub because of illegal content we failed to flag early enough. And GitHub did what they should do.

    Oh… and last but not least… mike asked me what Belt-on meant. I guess so let's make it more explicit.

  • The open source licence debate: what we need to know [Ed: ComputerWeekly should know that GitHub is proprietary software and does not speak for “Open Source”, it's entrapping it]

    Chief operating officer (COO) for GitHub Erica Brescia noted that, from her perspective, she is seeing an “increasing tension” between open source projects and those that are building services on top of open source, such as cloud vendors with their database services.

How to Upgrade From Windows 7 to Linux

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

If you’re still using Windows 7 because you just don’t like Windows 10, that’s understandable. But there’s an alternative upgrade path: You can install Linux on your PC for free, and you’ll have a supported operating system that’s still getting updates.

This is easier than you might think. You can try Linux on your PC before installing it, and you can even install it alongside Windows 7 when you make the leap. Here’s what you need to know.

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The Easiest Way to Switch from Windows 7 to Linux

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Welcome to the last day of Windows 7—the last day Microsoft is giving out security updates for the antiquated operating system, that is. While you have plenty of options for upgrading Windows 7, and even a hack that might be able to extend your updates for years, one of the best things you can do if you don’t want to make the jump to Windows 10 is to take a 90-degree turn toward Linux.

Yes, Linux. Don’t be scared. While your first thought is probably, “that’s too complicated for me,” hear me out. There are a number of Linux distributions that look and feel like the Windows you’re already familiar with. You won’t find yourself sitting in front of a command prompt, wondering what to do next, unless that’s the kind of experience you want. Otherwise, Linux isn’t terrifying in the slightest.

If you’re sticking with Windows 7 because of a specific reason—apps that only work on that version of the OS and nothing else—we even have a workaround for that, too: virtualizing Windows 7 so you can still access it in a safe, as-you-need-it fashion (assuming your system can handle it).

Stick with us, and we’ll show you just how easy it is to switch to Linux and all the great apps that couldn’t be any easier to download and install in the OS. (We do love package managers.)

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Openwashing and Microsoft Traps

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Microsoft
OSS
  • Facebook Open-Sources PySlowFast Codebase for Video Understanding

    PySlowFast will enable researchers to easily reproduce video classification and action detection algorithms, whether they are basic or cutting-edge. FAIR has also open-sourced a number of pretrained models to save researchers the trouble of repeatedly training sessions.

  • Deep Dive: How Open Source ID Solutions Can Accelerate Digital ID Implementation

    Digital identity solutions are becoming increasingly necessary as the world’s population grows. An estimated 1.1 billion people worldwide lack basic ID credentials, according to the World Bank, and that number rises even higher when it includes individuals with poor-quality IDs that cannot be easily verified. Those without access to verifiable credentials are often restricted from obtaining vital services like education and healthcare.

  • Clever LVL Panel Connection Method Wins Open Source Wood Challenge
  • A-COLD-WALL* Launches "Open-Source" Hardware Package

    The idea behind this release is similar to the concept of the exhibition, with open-source design a new focus for Samuel Ross and his label. A-COLD-WALL*’s statement continues, “Open-source as a philosophy brings forth conscious brand values that have the capacity to directly enhance interaction between individual and brand.”

    [...]

    The capsule features a range of buckles, branded badges, zip pullers, elastic drawcords and silicone cord stoppers, with silicone, nylon and metal used on different pieces. The full hardware package is available now from the A-COLD-WALL* web store, with prices ranging from £20 GBP ($26 USD) for some zip pullers to £30 GBP ($40 USD) for laser-engraved matt buckles.

  • Lyft Open Sources It's Cloud-Native Machine Learning Model 'Flyte'
  • Lyft open sources data orchestration platform Flyte

    Uber recently open-sourced its Manifold deep learning debugging tool and has a history of pushing its technology out into the public domain from platforms for training conversational AI and machine learning to autonomous vehicle visualization systems.

  • Meet Manifold: Uber's machine learning model debugging tool goes open source

    Manifold, Uber’s model-agnostic visual debugging tool for machine learning, is now open source and available as a demo version and a GitHub repository. Manifold is built with TensorFlow.js, React, and Redux and is part of the Michelangelo machine learning platform. The open source version includes a few new features that will make for an easier user experience.

  • What Can Happen When Your Company's Employees Embrace the Open Source Way?

    A recent Forbes article indicates that corporate engagement with open source communities has grown to become a strategic imperative over the past couple of decades. An increasing number of companies are paying their employees to contribute to such communities. This is one manifestation of a broader growing trend toward closer collaboration between companies and open source communities. Well-recognised companies such as Google, Uber, Facebook, and Twitter have open sourced their projects and encouraged their employees to contribute to open source communities. Among software developers who contribute to such communities, estimates suggest that up to 40% of them are paid by their company to do so. Some companies see this as an opportunity to enhance their employees’ skills while others aim to influence open source product development to support their own complementary products and services. Regardless of the motives, managers should consider the impact of such arrangements on the employees involved.

  • Tier IV and DeepMap Establish Technology Alliance

    Tier IV, a deep-tech startup based in Japan, is leading the development of the world's first open-source software for autonomous driving, known as Autoware.

    Autoware is an all-in-one self-driving car solution that integrates open source and BSD licenses. The solution supports tasks such as 3D localization and mapping, 3D road planning, subject and traffic signal detection, lane recognition, sensor calibration, and software simulation.

  • The Continuous Delivery Foundation advances CI/CD

    More organizations have matured from CI to CI/CD, but their paths differ as do their pipelines and results. Most enterprises are implementing a mix of open source, commercial and even home-grown tools, and they’re looking for answers.

    One place to look is the Continuous Delivery Foundation (CDF) which is home to many of the fastest-growing CI/CD open-source projects. The CDF fosters vendor-neutral collaboration among developers, end users and vendors to further best practices and industry specifications. DeployHub CEO and co-founder Tracy Ragan, who serves as the CDF general membership board representative, provides additional insight in this Q&A.

  • Continuous Delivery Foundation looks to build in Microsoft, further projects

    The Continuous Delivery Foundation is looking to draw in more members and projects as it heads towards its first birthday, with Microsoft top of the organisation’s hit list.

    The CDF formed back in March 2019, aiming to evangelize CI/CD as methodologies, and define/document best practices in and out of the cloud. Founder members included CloudBees and Google – it is home to the original Jenkins project, and Jenkins X, the Kubernetes-focused CI/CD platform, as well as the Google spawned Tekton.

Leaving Windows 7

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Ubuntu
  • Warning: Windows 7 is losing support, but so is this popular version of Ubuntu Linux!

    Windows 7 is a great operating system -- there is a reason so many computer users have clung to it. Well, we can also thank the terrible Windows 8 for scaring people from upgrading, I suppose. Windows 8.1 was better, and Windows 10 is actually pretty good, but neither are loved like Windows 7 is.

    Sadly, Microsoft is killing Windows 7 for most users -- it reaches end of life status in just two days, on January 14th. After that date, Windows 7 will be unsupported (except for businesses that choose to pay for extended support) -- you'd have to be a fool to continue using that operating system. You should upgrade to Windows 10 ASAP or switch to a Linux-based OS.

  • Windows 7, the "fresh" install

    I have a confession. For a few years I've had a Windows 7 box sitting on the shelf. Literally: sitting on a shelf, unconnected to anything, unused. I had bought it as a refurbished unit from an on-line retailer, to be my wife's PC, but I had to return it so many times for hardware problems that I finally bought her a refurb from a local store. Eventually the on-line retailer managed to send me a functioning -- but now superfluous -- unit, so I put it in storage. Who knows, maybe I'll need a Win 7 PC some day.

    When I learned that Windows 7 support is ending on January 14, 2020, I thought that I'd better activate and update that computer. So off the shelf, onto the desk, connect to the Internet, power up and go. Windows Update reported that my bare Win 7 Pro SP1 needed some 170 updates, which I accepted. About 17 failed, which I attributed to download errors; repeating Windows Update fixed all but 4.

    Ah, those four.

    Windows Update reported error codes 80092004 and 8050800c. The former, it seems, is due to a change in the SHA-2 signing of updates. Update 4490628 fixes this, but for some inscrutable reason Windows Update didn't install this essential update! So I had to go to the Microsoft Update Catalog and download and install it manually. (The Microsoft support page does not describe the procedure for manual installation, but I guessed that once I had downloaded the file, opening the Windows Explorer and double-clicking on the downloaded file would install it...and I was right.)

Trapping Code Inside Microsoft GitHub

Filed under
Development
Microsoft
  • Reinout van Rees: Github basic auth deprecation and jenkins

    Hm, that @nenskins user, that is our old jenkins instance talking to github somehow. Apparently through basic auth. Only... where? Most of the github traffic seemed to use just an access token. Jenkins calls that the secret text type. Basic auth is type username with password in jenkins.

    What it turned out to be was the github branch source plugin. This periodically looks at our github organisation to see if there are new projects or new branches that it missed. Normally github tells our jenkins when there's a new project or pull request or so.

    Ok, on to the jenkins settings for my organisation. The confusing thing here is that the "credentials" setting says this:

    Note that only "username with password" credentials are
    supported. Existing credentials of other kinds will be filtered out. This
    is because jenkins exercises GitHub API, and this last one does not
    support other ways of authentication.
    Huh? Github is refusing user/password basic auth, which is what this plugin only supports? I updated every plugin, but the problem still persisted.

  • VVVVVV from Terry Cavanagh has the source code opened up to celebrate the 10 year anniversary

    VVVVVV, the clever platformer from Terry Cavanagh where you reverse gravity instead of jumping has now be made open source.

    The open license doesn't cover the assets (icons, art, graphics or music) which are still under a proprietary license. So you will need some to play with it, which Cavanagh said you can get from the Make and Play Edition for personal use and that edition also has the tools to make levels.

Mozilla Censored Through Microsoft GitHub

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Microsoft
Moz/FF
  • webcompat.com Anonymous Reporting - Some context

    The first week of January, we had to disable anonymous reporting. GitHub in a two steps strike blocked webcompat-bot (which allows us to handle anonymous reporting) and finally the full web-bugs repo (which handles all the issues for webcompat.com). The reason for blocking was illegal content.

    Previous situation

    Anonymous reporting was open to everyone and we would moderate after the fact if the issue was really a liability for both GitHub or us. For the last 5 years, I guess the webcompat.com site was not known enough to not be a target of bots and the issues not regular enough. The situation has evolved.

    The fall: We missed one issue which needed to be moderated and deleted. It was in a public view for quite a long time. We need to review our process about that.

    [...]

    While anonymity or soft-anonymity is an important feature in our society, it also creates challenges in some contexts. Some of these issues are not only tied to anonymous reporting, but anonymous reporting makes it more difficult to have a direct discussion about them.

  • Open Letter to Indian IT Minister by Mozilla, GitHub, and Cloudflare: Release draft intermediary liability rules, assuage concerns voiced during public consultation

    Given the Indian government’s impending commitment to the Supreme Court to notify the intermediary liability amendments by January 15 2020, global internet organizations Mozilla, GitHub, and Cloudflare have penned an open letter to the Union Minister of Electronics & Information Technology, Shri. Ravi Shankar Prasad. The letter highlights significant concerns with the rules and calls for improved transparency by allowing the public an opportunity to see a final version of these amendments prior to their enactment.

Why and how to switch from Windows 7 to Linux

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Because many people are not really aware of good alternatives outside of the Microsoft world and a lot of them don’t want to upgrade their existing machines to Windows 10 themselves, most of the current Windows 7 users will therefore automatically be inclined to purchase an entirely new computer as a replacement for their current system, as on each new system Windows 10 is already pre-installed which is of course more convenient. As a result many still usable but older computers will therefore unnecessarily end up in the garbage dump. However, there are lots of people, including myself, who have a problem with throwing away still perfectly working equipment, or just don’t want to make the switch to Windows 10 at all. And for these people it is very important to be educated that there are a lot of very user friendly Linux distributions that could bring back life into their old but trusted computer and give back a user experience as it was bought yesterday.

Linux really breathes new life into old equipment. While the relatively extensive Linux Mint is already running fine on old computers, you can get even more performance out of your ancient hardware by using a very light Linux distribution, such as Lubuntu, Zorin Lite or Linux Lite. My goal is to make as many current Windows 7 users as possible aware of what Linux has to offer and to what extent the purchase of a new computer may be postponed.

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Entrapment (Microsoft GitHub) and Distortion of Statistics

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Microsoft
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More in Tux Machines

Kubernetes: KubeInvaders, CSI Ephemeral Inline Volumes and Reviewing 2019 in Docs

  • KubeInvaders - Gamified Chaos Engineering Tool for Kubernetes

    Some months ago, I released my latest project called KubeInvaders. The first time I shared it with the community was during an Openshift Commons Briefing session. Kubenvaders is a Gamified Chaos Engineering tool for Kubernetes and Openshift and helps test how resilient your Kubernetes cluster is, in a fun way.

  • CSI Ephemeral Inline Volumes

    Typically, volumes provided by an external storage driver in Kubernetes are persistent, with a lifecycle that is completely independent of pods or (as a special case) loosely coupled to the first pod which uses a volume (late binding mode). The mechanism for requesting and defining such volumes in Kubernetes are Persistent Volume Claim (PVC) and Persistent Volume (PV) objects. Originally, volumes that are backed by a Container Storage Interface (CSI) driver could only be used via this PVC/PV mechanism. But there are also use cases for data volumes whose content and lifecycle is tied to a pod. For example, a driver might populate a volume with dynamically created secrets that are specific to the application running in the pod. Such volumes need to be created together with a pod and can be deleted as part of pod termination (ephemeral). They get defined as part of the pod spec (inline). Since Kubernetes 1.15, CSI drivers can also be used for such ephemeral inline volumes. The CSIInlineVolume feature gate had to be set to enable it in 1.15 because support was still in alpha state. In 1.16, the feature reached beta state, which typically means that it is enabled in clusters by default. CSI drivers have to be adapted to support this because although two existing CSI gRPC calls are used (NodePublishVolume and NodeUnpublishVolume), the way how they are used is different and not covered by the CSI spec: for ephemeral volumes, only NodePublishVolume is invoked by kubelet when asking the CSI driver for a volume. All other calls (like CreateVolume, NodeStageVolume, etc.) are skipped. The volume parameters are provided in the pod spec and from there copied into the NodePublishVolumeRequest.volume_context field. There are currently no standardized parameters; even common ones like size must be provided in a format that is defined by the CSI driver. Likewise, only NodeUnpublishVolume gets called after the pod has terminated and the volume needs to be removed.

  • Reviewing 2019 in Docs

    Hi, folks! I’m one of the co-chairs for the Kubernetes documentation special interest group (SIG Docs). This blog post is a review of SIG Docs in 2019. Our contributors did amazing work last year, and I want to highlight their successes. Although I review 2019 in this post, my goal is to point forward to 2020. I observe some trends in SIG Docs–some good, others troubling. I want to raise visibility before those challenges increase in severity.

Programming/Development: Perl, Python/Django and Bash

  • Springtime in Switzerland

    During the same week I’ll also be giving a half-day seminar on Raku, which has been generously sponsored by EPFL and so will cost nothing to attend. It’s suitable for anyone who would like a quick but comprehensive overview of this remarkable new programming language. Besides making the Raku seminar entirely free, SIB/UNIL/EPFL have done an amazing job keeping the prices of the other classes extremely competitive...especially if you can claim a plausible association to any academic institution, either as a student or staff member. If you’re looking for some training that’s economical, practical, and just plain fun, in a location that’s central, civilised, and simply breathtaking, then this week in Switzerland might fit just the bill.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #404 (Jan. 21, 2020)
  • Basic Data Types in Python

    In this step-by-step course, you’ll dig into the basic data types that are built into Python.

  • Python 3.7.5 : Django security issues - part 002.
  • Python 3.7.5 : Use Django Formsets.

    Django Formsets manage the complexity of multiple copies of a form in a view.  This simplifies the task of creating a formset for a form that handles multiple instances of a model.

  • Hunting gremlins

    In the UTF-8 files I audit, the only invisible characters I expect to see... er... not see... are whitespace (hexadecimal 20), horizontal tab (09) and newline (linefeed; 0a). All others I call "gremlins". They include carriage return (0d), no-break space (c2 a0), soft hyphen (c2 ad) and another 62 control characters. Gremlins are a nuisance. One gremlin causes a shell to hang. Less evil gremlins lurk inside apparently OK strings and cause the strings to be processed weirdly. In the file "demo1", two of the strings contain no-break spaces (in different places), two contain soft hyphens (in different places) and three have no gremlins. 

  • A more expressive Bash prompt

    Bash provides some interesting built-in specifiers for the prompt strings PS1. 

Mozilla: Developer Roadshow (Asia Tour), CRLite, Async Interview

  • The Mozilla Developer Roadshow: Asia Tour Retrospective and 2020 Plans

    November 2019 was a busy month for the Mozilla Developer Roadshow, with stops in five Asian cities —Tokyo, Seoul, Taipei, Singapore, and Bangkok. Today, we’re releasing a playlist of the talks presented in Asia. We are extremely pleased to include subtitles for all these talks in languages spoken in the countries on this tour: Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Thai, as well as English. One talk, Hui Jing Chen’s “Making CSS from Good to Great: The Power of Subgrid”, was delivered in Singlish (a Singaporean creole) at the event in Singapore! In addition, because our audiences included non-native English speakers, presenters took care to include local language vocabulary in their talks, wherever applicable, and to speak slowly and clearly. We hope to continue to provide multilingual support for our video content in the future, to increase access for all developers worldwide.

  • CRLite: Speeding Up Secure Browsing

    CRLite pushes bulk certificate revocation information to Firefox users, reducing the need to actively query such information one by one. Additionally this new technology eliminates the privacy leak that individual queries can bring, and does so for the whole Web, not just special parts of it. The first two posts in this series about the newly-added CRLite technology provide background: Introducing CRLite: All of the Web PKI’s revocations, compressed and The End-to-End Design of CRLite. Since mid-December, our pre-release Firefox Nightly users have been evaluating our CRLite system while performing normal web browsing. Gathering information through Firefox Telemetry has allowed us to verify the effectiveness of CRLite.

  • Niko Matsakis: Async Interview #5: Steven Fackler

    Hello! For the latest async interview, I spoke with Steven Fackler (sfackler). sfackler has been involved in Rust for a long time and is a member of the Rust libs team. He is also the author of a lot of crates, most notably tokio-postgres. I particularly wanted to talk to sfackler about the AsyncRead and AsyncWrite traits. These traits are on everybody’s list of “important things to stabilize”, particularly if we want to create more interop between different executors and runtimes. On the other hand, in [tokio-rs/tokio#1744], the tokio project is considering adopting its own variant traits that diverge significantly from those in the futures crate, precisely because they have concerns over the design of the traits as is. This seems like an important area to dig into!

Graphics: Wayland 1.18 Alpha, Linux on Embedded Ryzen with Radeon, and Keith Packard's X Talk

  • wayland 1.17.91
    This is the alpha release for Wayland 1.18. Here's a highlight of the
    biggest changes:
    
    - Add support for the Meson build system (autotools is still supported
      but will be removed in a future release)
    - Add API to tag proxy objects to allow applications and toolkits to
      share the same Wayland connection
    - Track wayland-server timers in user-space to prevent creating too
      many FDs
    - Add wl_global_remove, a new function to mitigate race conditions with
      globals
    
    Thanks to all contributors!
    
    Full commit history below.
    
    Antonio Borneo (1):
          log: remove "%m" from format strings by using strerror(errno)
    
    Daniel Stone (2):
          build/doc: Ensure destination dir exists despite VPATH
          display-test: Remove unused variables
    
    Drew DeVault (3):
          Document unusual wl_registry.bind new_id behavior
          Add .editorconfig
          Improve description of wl_surface
    
    Emmanuel Gil Peyrot (2):
          cursor: Use memfd_create() when available
          wayland-shm: Don’t set SIGBUS handlers on unshrinkable fd
    
    Emmanuele Bassi (2):
          Support running tests from different build directories
          Add Meson build
    
    Harish Krupo (2):
          docs: Abort configure if docbook-xsl package is missing
          wayland.xml: document invalid_finish error in wl_data_offer.finish
    
    Jiayuan Ren (1):
          adding O_RDWR flag in the open()
    
    Jonas Ådahl (1):
          proxy: Add API to tag proxy objects
    
    Joshua Watt (2):
          scanner: Add configure check for strndup
          Move wl_priv_signal to wayland-server-private.h
    
    Leonid Bobrov (1):
          configure: detect libdl and librt
    
    Liu Wenlong (1):
          server: Fix fake "Address already in use" error
    
    Manuel Stoeckl (13):
          scanner: error when element names will not compile
          tests: Verify that wayland_scanner can catch bad identifiers
          protocol: clarify wl_display.delete_id description
          connection: do not abort when dup(fd) fails
          client: Ignore new requests if display has a fatal error
          client: Don't abort when sending a request fails
          tests: Test that send overflow doesn't abort
          tests: Fix race condition in send overflow test
          tests: Ensure that overflow test always overflows
          event-loop-test: Verify proper timer cancellation
          event-loop-test: Confirm distant timers do not fire
          event-loop: Track timer event sources in userspace
          event-loop-test: Add test to verify timer ordering
    
    Marty E. Plummer (1):
          scanner: prepend protocol name to types symbol
    
    Michael Forney (3):
          Use wl_container_of internally
          Avoid pointer arithmetic on `void *`
          protocol: fix typo in wl_data_offer.set_actions description
    
    Mosè Giordano (1):
          Add $(RT_LIBS) to fixed-benchmark LD dependencies
    
    Pekka Paalanen (2):
          configure.ac: reopen master for regular development
          scanner: include config.h from command line
    
    Scott Anderson (1):
          wayland.xml: Make releases for multiple 'wl_surface.attach' undefined
    
    Simon Ser (22):
          Add releasing.txt
          releasing: adapt for Wayland
          releasing: fixup section numbers
          protocol: allow to send a zero output refresh rate
          client: check event opcode in queue_event
          Update .editorconfig for Python
          Add an automated script to update wl_shm.format
          protocol: add a comment about the wl_shm.format script
          protocol: sync wl_shm.format with libdrm 2.4.99
          server: check global interface on bind
          tests: test that binding to a global with an interface mismatch fails
          protocol: invalid_method is sent on malformed request
          server: add wl_global_set_user_data
          server: add wl_global_remove
          tests: add a test for wl_global_remove
          build: check wayland-scanner version
          Revert "build: check wayland-scanner version"
          meson: use strict wayland-scanner mode
          autotools: use strict wayland-scanner mode
          build: check wayland-scanner version
          protocol: add missing enums for wl_data_device_manager.dnd_action
          build: bump to version 1.17.91 for the alpha release
    
    asynts (1):
          doc: Expand the abbreviation "hw" to "hardware".
    
    orbea (1):
          Add a missing -pthread to fix compile with slibtool.
    
    git tag: 1.17.91
    
  • Wayland 1.18 Alpha Released With Meson Support, Connection Sharing

    Wayland 1.18 is adding Meson build system support so that Autotools can be dropped in a future release, API support for allowing applications and toolkits to share the same Wayland connection, better handling over file descriptors, and wl_global_remove as a new function for mitigating race conditions with globals. There are also various test improvements, improved documentation, and various other fixes and minor improvements.

  • Linux on Embedded Ryzen with Radeon

    American Micro Devices (AMD) has released the Ryzen processors which works very well with Linux. The embedded processor also contains a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) which is an AMD Ryzen Vega. The board I am using is the IBase 918f-1605 to install Linux. Linux can be installed from a stock ISO, but the system does not perform as well unless using a special Linux kernel from AMD. It also helps to have the proper GPU driver for performance. Stability is much better with the AMD kernel they provide on their website.

  • Keith Packard Talks About The Early Politics Of X Window System + Code Licensing

    At last week's Linux.Conf.Au conference was an interesting presentation by longtime X developer Keith Packard on the early days of the pre-X.Org X Window System, the collapse of Unix, and how his views formed on copyleft licenses for building thriving communities. Keith's LCA 2020 presentation is focused on the X happenings largely during the 80's and very early 90's. Keith's involvement goes back to the 80's during which he was employed at MIT as part of the X Consortium.

  • Keith Packard: lca2020

    I just got back from linux.conf.au 2020 on Saturday and am still adjusting to being home again. I had the opportunity to give three presentations during the conference and wanted to provide links to the slides and videos.