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Microsoft

Another Microsoft mess as Windows 10 November 2019 Update breaks File Explorer

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Microsoft

When Microsoft announced that the Windows 10 November 2019 Update was going to be a rather minor release with only a few changes, many of us hoped that this would mean that its launch would be relatively problem free – but that unfortunately doesn’t seem to be the case, with users complaining that the new update is breaking File Explorer.

File Explorer is the app you use to browse the files and folders on your PC. So pretty important, then.

The biggest change the Windows 10 November 2019 Update brought was to update how you search File Explorer, giving you suggested files, and searching your online OneDrive account, when you use the search box to look for something.

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Microsoft restores services after it experienced a large global outage across numerous platforms

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Microsoft

Microsoft says it first addressed the issue at about 8:15 p.m. ET. As of 9:30 p.m. ET, the company said it identified access issues with the Microsoft 365 Admin Center, Exchange Online, SharePoint Online, Microsoft Teams, Skype for Business, and Yammer.

The company said in a tweet that it "identified and reverted a networking build that caused user traffic from the internet to Microsoft 365 services to intermittently fail."

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Microsoft Claims a Monopoly Over 'Open Source'

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Microsoft

Lots of Microsoft Openwashing This Past Week

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Microsoft

Microsoft Self-Promotion Using the "Linux" Brand

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Linux
Microsoft

today's leftovers

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Microsoft
Gaming
Misc
  • Microsoft cloud services may be hitting their limit in some regions [Ed: So what we heard was correct]
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  • An Unnamed Source Who Shouldn’t Be Anonymous

                         

                           

    “When you find a problem in the source code, it’s very difficult to explain the consequences of that problem to a judge or jury,” he told me. “It’s written in a foreign language, and the effects are hard to trace. We’re rarely able to say, ‘Aha, here’s this person’s breath test and here’s the problem that caused it to be wrong.’”

                           

    Mr. Workman’s mind worked a lot like the computer systems into which he delved: He had a mental index of more than 15 years of legal battles and civic investigations into problems with breath-testing programs, and he knew exactly where to find the incendiary bits. When I dug into flawed test results in Washington, D.C., for example, he sent me a video recording of a police officer turned whistle-blower testifying at an oversight hearing.

  •                    

  • The upcoming action RPG Bound By Blades now has a Linux demo

    Developer Zeth recently put up a Linux demo of their in-development action RPG, Bound By Blades, which is in need of some testing and feedback.

    Using a pretty fun sounding four-corner combat system, where you run from corner to corner around the outside of enemies and attack/defend at each point. It's pretty unusual and good to see something a little different. Sadly, their recent Kickstarter failed to get funding. However, they've confirmed development will continue but it's going to be smaller in scope.

  • Proton GE has a another new release out with patches for GTA V and lots of updates

    Proton GE, the unofficial and updated build of Proton for Steam Play has another big new release out. To help those who can't wait for Valve/CodeWeavers to update the official Proton or you need some extra fixes.

    With Proton-4.19-GE-1 now available it includes updated builds of DXVK, D9VK, FAudio and Vkd3d. On top of that, it's also pulled in patches to help with GTA V and the Rockstar Launcher, a patch to help with Origin client downloads, patches to fix Skyrim SkyUI status effect icons, patches to help Mortal Kombat 11 run (although online matches won't work) and more.

  • Linux Action News 130

    Fedora arrives from the future, the big players line up behind KernelCI, and researchers claim significant vulnerabilities in Horde.

    Plus, Google's new dashboard for WordPress and ProtonMail's apps go open source.

  • stress-ng Embedded Linux Conference Europe 2019 presentation
  • Giveaway Week – Balena Fin Developer Kit

    We’ve been organizing “giveaway weeks” every year since 2014 on CNX Software to send some of the review samples to our readers.

FUD, Security and Microsoft Spin

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Microsoft
Security
  • Commercial vs open source software [Ed: Falsehoods all along. FOSS is also "commercial"; they deceive to make proprietary software seem like the only option for commerce]

    Every business owner that needs a personalized software needs to make a choice between two options. Choosing a commercial software or open-source software. If you are not familiar with these two terms, worry not, we’ll explain everything.

  • The need for open source audits in cybersecurity M&As [Ed: Microsoft-connected Black Duck is smearing FOSS again... to sell its proprietary software snakeoil]
  • Software Security Witching Hour is Upon us [Ed: Microsoft-connected Black Duck continues to attack FOSS with FUD. Microsoft hates FOSS. It just uses Synopsys et al as proxies for the badmouthing.]
  • Let’s Talk Open Source Trends (A 2020 Early Look) [Ed: Well, Flexera views "open source" as little more than opportunity for "compliance" job (money), much like Black Duck]

    There are two emerging trends to take note of now. First, there’s an increased importance around open source compliance and security due to specific industry regulatory changes and requirements. For example, this year the PCI Security Standards Council introduced a new standard of making electronic payments more secure. The standard requires software companies to continuously identify and assess weaknesses in software applications, including the entire software supply chain; key word here being “continuously.” Prior to the implementation of this standard, companies were advised to monitor their use of open source software with no emphasis on ongoing scanning and management.

  • The First BlueKeep Mass Hacking Is Finally Here—but Don't Panic [Ed: NSA collusion with Microsoft gives us this and much more]

    When Microsoft revealed last May that millions of Windows devices had a serious hackable flaw known as BlueKeep—one that could enable an automated worm to spread malware from computer to computer—it seemed only a matter of time before someone unleashed a global attack. As predicted, a BlueKeep campaign has finally struck. But so far it's fallen short of the worst case scenario.

    Security researchers have spotted evidence that their so-called honeypots—bait machines designed to help detect and analyze malware outbreaks—are being compromised en masse using the BlueKeep vulnerability. The bug in Microsoft's Remote Desktop Protocol allows a hacker to gain full remote code execution on unpatched machines; while it had previously only been exploited in proofs of concept, it has potentially devastating consequences. Another worm that targeted Windows machines in 2017, the NotPetya ransomware attack, caused more than 10 billion dollars in damage worldwide.

    But so far, the widespread BlueKeep hacking merely installs a cryptocurrency miner, leeching a victim's processing power to generate cryptocurrency. And rather than a worm that jumps unassisted from one computer to the next, these attackers appear to have scanned the internet for vulnerable machines to exploit. That makes this current wave unlikely to result in an epidemic.

  • Hackers can steal the contents of Horde webmail inboxes with one click [Ed: Microsoft Zack ('former' employee) not covering Microsoft NSA back doors that cause billions in damage, instead trying to damage the name of FOSS because sending people a malicious link and a trick can cause problems?

    A security researcher has found several vulnerabilities in the popular open-source Horde web email software that allow hackers to near-invisibly steal the contents of a victim’s inbox.

    Horde is one of the most popular free and open-source web email systems available. It’s built and maintained by a core team of developers, with contributions from the wider open-source community. It’s used by universities, libraries and many web hosting providers as the default email client.

    Numan Ozdemir disclosed his vulnerabilities to Horde in May. An attacker can scrape and download a victim’s entire inbox by tricking them into clicking a malicious link in an email.

  • New Tool Will Find Secrets – Including Crypto Keys – in Your Public Code

    The app, which is open source, scans code repository GitHub for dangerous files and data. As a beginning coder, you may have left your password data or private keys inside public repository without realizing. When this happens, hackers and other nasties can easily access your stuff.

  • Briefing: Microsoft's GitHub Employees Still Pushing Back On ICE Contract

    Employees from Microsoft’s GitHub subsidiary are continuing to voice their concerns over the recent decision to renew a software contract with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), and least one GitHub employee has resigned in protest, the Los Angeles Times reported.

    The situation illustrates the difficulties large software companies sometimes experience when integrating acquisitions of smaller companies.

    GitHub, which has built a more diverse and inclusive corporate culture in the years following a gender harassment scandal in 2014, is one of several open source companies where employees pay close attention to how their products are used, said Josh McKenty, an executive who has worked at companies that sell open source software.

    “The open source ethos represents a fundamental attitude of being able to control what happens to your work product,” he said.

GEEK TO ME: Linux as a Windows alternative involves a steep learning curve

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

For some people, such as yourself, Linux is a great alternative to Windows. It’s cheap enough – usually free. It requires less memory, and less CPU horsepower than Windows, making it an excellent choice for keeping older hardware alive. But, for many (I would say most) users, for all the reasons above, and probably more, it’s just not a good fit.

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EU link (the above is blocked in the EU for breaching GDPR): GEEK TO ME: Linux as a Windows alternative involves a steep learning curve

Censorship at Microsoft GitHub and Employees Protesting, Leaving

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Development
Microsoft
  • Github removes Tsunami Democràtic’s APK after a takedown order from Spain

    Microsoft-owned Github has removed the APK of an app for organizing political protests in the autonomous community of Catalonia — acting on a court takedown request sent by Spain’s Guardia Civil, a national police force with military status.

    As we reported earlier this month supporters of independence for Catalonia have regrouped under a new banner — calling itself Tsunami Democràtic — with the aim of rebooting the political movement and campaigning for self-determination by mobilizing street protests and peaceful civil disobedience.

    The group has also been developing bespoke technology tools to coordinate protest action. It’s one of these tools, the Tsunami Democràtic app, which was being hosted as an APK on Github and has now been taken down.

  • GitHub is trying to quell employee anger over its ICE contract. It’s not going well

    When GitHub Chief Executive Nat Friedman announced on Oct. 9 his company would donate half a million dollars to nonprofits helping communities affected by the Trump administration’s immigration policies, it was a peace offering of sorts.

    Employees had recently learned that the Microsoft-owned software development platform had renewed its 2016 contract with the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency.

    In donating the money and making clear his personal disagreement with harsh immigration law enforcement, Friedman appeared intent on averting an internal protest of the sort that has roiled other technology firms whose software powers controversial government policies.

    It didn’t work.

    In the weeks since, frustration has risen among some within GitHub. After promising to address questions on the ICE relationship at a Q&A session scheduled for Oct. 11, executives canceled the meeting, blaming the cancellation on employee leaks, according to an email reviewed by The Times. At an all-hands meeting held Oct. 24, executives did not discuss the results of a quarterly survey showing negative sentiment toward GitHub’s leadership as planned, according to two employees.

    With the issue refusing to go away, GitHub executives have changed their internal messaging, including a memo to employees saying that barring ICE from “access to GitHub could actually hurt the very people we all want to help,” in the words of Chief Operating Officer Erica Brescia.

    “We have learned from a number of nonprofits and refugee advocates that one of the greatest challenges facing immigrants is a lack of technology at ICE and related agencies, resulting in lost case files, court date notifications not being delivered, or the wrong people being charged or deported,” read a companywide posting sent Oct. 22, signed by Brescia and the leadership team.

    Brescia’s letter was a second response to an Oct. 9 open letter from employees calling on GitHub to cancel its contract with ICE. The employees behind it said continuing to work with ICE would make the San Francisco-based company “complicit in widespread human rights abuses.” In the company’s initial response, Friedman said that though he disagreed with the immigration policies ICE is enforcing, canceling the contract would not convince the Trump administration to change them. Friedman also said the revenue from the contract — about $200,000 — was not financially material for the company.

    In response to requests for comment, GitHub referred The Times back to Friedman’s Oct. 9 blog post.

    GitHub is just the latest tech company to face employee resistance to government contracts, particularly those with the Department of Homeland Security. In June 2018, Google, facing employee opposition, said it would not renew its contract to develop artificial intelligence systems for the Pentagon. In the same month, 500 Amazon workers called on executives to stop selling facial recognition to the government, without result. Employees of the e-commerce brand Wayfair walked out of their offices in June 2019 to protest the sale of beds to immigration detention centers.

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