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Microsoft

Firefox Putting on the Pressure

Filed under
Microsoft
Security

Microsoft must be feeling the pressure from competing browsers as they are putting a lot of thought into how to improve Internet Explorer. However, they probably won't have a new version ready until Longhorn goes gold planned for 2006. Eweek is carrying more on this story.

In other news, Bill Gates' trip to Turkey only proved that Linux is cutting into his profits more and more as well. The newer Turkix was found to be quite popular there and is picking up speed as other European nations begin to show interest.

UPDATE: More Passing the Buck from M$.

M$ Claims Safer than Linux

Filed under
Microsoft
SUSE

Mike Nash claims microsoft is safer than Linux stating "Year-to-date for 2005, Microsoft has fixed 15 vulnerabilities affecting Windows Server 2003. In the same time period, for just this year, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 users have had to patch 34 vulnerabilities and SuSE Enterprise Linux 9 users have had to patch over 78 vulnerabilities." Did someone say biased and misleading statistics? Yep, safer huh?

M$ Antitrust Settlement May Not Foster Competition

Filed under
Microsoft

Reuters is reporting that "The federal judge overseeing the landmark Microsoft Corp. antitrust settlement said on Wednesday there was no guarantee the pact will put a dent in the company's Windows computer operating system monopoly." Well, duh!

M$ Continues its Attack

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Yet more hot air from Microsoft on how Linux still isn't ready for the desktop and how microsoft offers more on the enterprise level as well - citing ease of use, accountability and even price. Yaawwwnnn!

On the Redmond Front

Filed under
Microsoft
Security

It's being reported that Microsoft has had to issue more patches for several vulnerabilities. In fact "six of the patches deal with code that was updated in Windows Service Pack 2." I wonder if this has been addressed. This comes on the heels of announcing the purchase of an anti-virus software company and being countersued by ITAC for libel. Here's that story. Makes one really glad they use Linux huh?

More BS from the Evil One.

Filed under
Microsoft

Seems Mr. Gates is at it again with saying one thing while trying to cleverly conceal his jabs at Linux. This time speaking of interoperability amongst differing architectures while stating that doesn't mean open source as open source is detrimental to interoperability. Does that seem backwards to anyone else besides me? This is posted all over the net, but here's one reference at Betanews.

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Servers: Kuberhealthy, Red Hat and Denuvo DRM

  • K8s KPIs with Kuberhealthy

    Last November at KubeCon San Diego 2019, we announced the release of Kuberhealthy 2.0.0 - transforming Kuberhealthy into a Kubernetes operator for synthetic monitoring. This new ability granted developers the means to create their own Kuberhealthy check containers to synthetically monitor their applications and clusters. The community was quick to adopt this new feature and we’re grateful for everyone who implemented and tested Kuberhealthy 2.0.0 in their clusters. Thanks to all of you who reported issues and contributed to discussions on the #kuberhealthy Slack channel. We quickly set to work to address all your feedback with a newer version of Kuberhealthy. Additionally, we created a guide on how to easily install and use Kuberhealthy in order to capture some helpful synthetic KPIs.

  • Empowering remote teams to collaborate in a WFH world

    Many more people are working at home these days, and although much of this started with COVID-19, remote work from home (WFH) could become standard procedure for businesses around the world. Team members may no longer work on-site, in the same building, but proper communication and collaboration is still the foundation of teamwork. Of course, this means teams need to conduct remote meetings on a regular basis, more than they ever have before. Many of us already attend conference calls all the time, but remote meetings—where every team member is working from home—that is a completely new encounter for most teams.

  • Fedora program update: 2020-22

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora this week. Fedora 30 has reached end-of-life. Elections voting is open through 11 June. I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • Earn a badge with the new IBM Blockchain Foundation Developer course
  • FINOS expands industry presence by joining the Linux Foundation

    Red Hat is part of many communities, and one community that is important to us, and to the financial services industry, is the Fintech Open Source Foundation (FINOS). This community helps drive open source advancements geared specifically towards the unique needs of the financial services firms, accelerating innovation and collaboration through the adoption of open source software, standards, best practices and governance. Red Hat joined FINOS as a Gold Member in spring of 2018, and Red Hat OpenShift is providing the underlying technology for the FINOS Open Developer Platform (ODP), one of the leading venues for community development within the financial services community. Red Hat has also contributed its open source leadership experience to the Open Source Readiness Project, which provides governance and open source legal guidance to banks who are first participating in open source. Additionally, we’ve provided our experience and expertise in the hybrid cloud to help progress the Cloud Services Certification project under FINOS, which works to accelerate firms’ journeys to open source readiness. Red Hat is also an active member of the Linux Foundation, which is dedicated to building sustainable ecosystems around open source projects, with the goal of accelerating technology development and adoption. The Linux Foundation was founded in 2000, and has helped to establish and build some of the most critical open source technologies in use. Additionally, it has expanded its work beyond Linux, to foster innovation at every layer of the stack.

  • Denuvo's Anti-Cheat Software Now Getting Ripped From Games At Record Speed Too

    Remember Denuvo? Back in the far simpler times of 2016-2018, which somehow seem light years better than 2020 despite being veritable dumpster fires in and of themselves, we wrote a series of posts about Denuvo's DRM and how it went from nigh-uncrackable to totally crackable upon games being released with it. Did we take a bit too much pleasure in this precipitous fall? Sure, though our general anti-DRM stance sort of mandated dunking on a company that once touted itself as invincible. Either way, it started to get comical watching publishers release a game with Denuvo, have the game cracked in a matter of days, if not hours, and then release a patch to remove Denuvo entirely from the game.

People in Free Software: Efstathios Iosifidis, Asa Dotzler and Amin Bandali

  • Meet the GNOMEies: Efstathios Iosifidis

    I am a veterinarian and I work at a vet practice. In 2010, my friend Kostas and I had a dream to revive openSUSE community in Greece. Our project was very successful, and the global community trusted us to organize the openSUSE conference in 2013. During that period I got involved in other open source projects and communities. Right now I travel to different cities to attend national and international conferences, I speak and represent open source projects on those events. I was in the organization committee of GUADEC 2019. [...] Do you have any other affiliations you want to share? I am openSUSE member. I also contribute to other communities such as GNU Health, Nextcloud, ONLYOFFICE, ownCloud. Why did you get involved in GNOME? My first distro was Ubuntu and then Fedora. Both using GNOME. During my involvement with openSUSE global community, I met my friend Isabel Valverde. She was into GNOME community and she dragged me into GNOME community. Why are you still involved with GNOME? GNOME is one of the most important open source software/desktop environment. I would like to thank the community that releases new versions with many features. I use a powerful “tool” for free, so the least I can do is translate and promote it so more people can use it. Although I’m involved in other communities, GNOME is one of the most friendly and awesome ones.

  • Asa Dotzler: 20 Years with Mozilla

    Today marks 20 years I’ve been working full-time for Mozilla. As the Mozilla organization evolved, I moved with it. I started with staff@mozilla.org at Netscape 20 years ago, moved to the Mozilla Foundation ~17 years ago, and the Mozilla Corporation ~15 years ago. Thank you to Mitchell Baker for taking a chance on me. I’m eternally grateful for that opportunity.

  • Introducing Amin Bandali, intern with the FSF tech team

    Hi there, I'm Amin Bandali, often just bandali on the interwebs. I wear a few different hats around GNU as a maintainer, Web master, and Savannah hacker, and I'm very excited to be extending that to the Free Software Foundation (FSF) as an intern with the FSF tech team for spring 2020. Growing up around parents with backgrounds in computer engineering and programming, it did not take long for me to find an interest in tinkering and playing with computers as a kid, and I first came into contact with GNU/Linux in my teenage years. My first introduction to the world of free software came a few years later, when a friend kindly pointed out to me that what I had vaguely known and referred to as "open source" software is more properly referred to as free software, and helped me see why "open source" misses the point of free software. After learning about and absorbing the ideas and ideals of free software, I have since become a free software activist. As a computer scientist who enjoys studying and hacking on various programs and sometimes writing my own, I have made a point of releasing all I can under strong copyleft licenses, particularly the GNU AGPL license. My involvement with the GNU Project started in 2016, first as a volunteer Web master, and later as one of the maintainers of GNUzilla and IceCat late last year. Also around the same time, I led a group of volunteers in organizing and holding EmacsConf 2019 as a completely online conference, using only free software tools, much like the excellent LibrePlanet 2020. I love GNU Emacs, and use it more than any other program. GNU Emacs helps me do a wide variety of tasks such as programming, reading and composing emails, and chatting via IRC.