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Microsoft

Openwashing and Microsoft Traps

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS
  • Facebook Open-Sources PySlowFast Codebase for Video Understanding

    PySlowFast will enable researchers to easily reproduce video classification and action detection algorithms, whether they are basic or cutting-edge. FAIR has also open-sourced a number of pretrained models to save researchers the trouble of repeatedly training sessions.

  • Deep Dive: How Open Source ID Solutions Can Accelerate Digital ID Implementation

    Digital identity solutions are becoming increasingly necessary as the world’s population grows. An estimated 1.1 billion people worldwide lack basic ID credentials, according to the World Bank, and that number rises even higher when it includes individuals with poor-quality IDs that cannot be easily verified. Those without access to verifiable credentials are often restricted from obtaining vital services like education and healthcare.

  • Clever LVL Panel Connection Method Wins Open Source Wood Challenge
  • A-COLD-WALL* Launches "Open-Source" Hardware Package

    The idea behind this release is similar to the concept of the exhibition, with open-source design a new focus for Samuel Ross and his label. A-COLD-WALL*’s statement continues, “Open-source as a philosophy brings forth conscious brand values that have the capacity to directly enhance interaction between individual and brand.”

    [...]

    The capsule features a range of buckles, branded badges, zip pullers, elastic drawcords and silicone cord stoppers, with silicone, nylon and metal used on different pieces. The full hardware package is available now from the A-COLD-WALL* web store, with prices ranging from £20 GBP ($26 USD) for some zip pullers to £30 GBP ($40 USD) for laser-engraved matt buckles.

  • Lyft Open Sources It's Cloud-Native Machine Learning Model 'Flyte'
  • Lyft open sources data orchestration platform Flyte

    Uber recently open-sourced its Manifold deep learning debugging tool and has a history of pushing its technology out into the public domain from platforms for training conversational AI and machine learning to autonomous vehicle visualization systems.

  • Meet Manifold: Uber's machine learning model debugging tool goes open source

    Manifold, Uber’s model-agnostic visual debugging tool for machine learning, is now open source and available as a demo version and a GitHub repository. Manifold is built with TensorFlow.js, React, and Redux and is part of the Michelangelo machine learning platform. The open source version includes a few new features that will make for an easier user experience.

  • What Can Happen When Your Company's Employees Embrace the Open Source Way?

    A recent Forbes article indicates that corporate engagement with open source communities has grown to become a strategic imperative over the past couple of decades. An increasing number of companies are paying their employees to contribute to such communities. This is one manifestation of a broader growing trend toward closer collaboration between companies and open source communities. Well-recognised companies such as Google, Uber, Facebook, and Twitter have open sourced their projects and encouraged their employees to contribute to open source communities. Among software developers who contribute to such communities, estimates suggest that up to 40% of them are paid by their company to do so. Some companies see this as an opportunity to enhance their employees’ skills while others aim to influence open source product development to support their own complementary products and services. Regardless of the motives, managers should consider the impact of such arrangements on the employees involved.

  • Tier IV and DeepMap Establish Technology Alliance

    Tier IV, a deep-tech startup based in Japan, is leading the development of the world's first open-source software for autonomous driving, known as Autoware.

    Autoware is an all-in-one self-driving car solution that integrates open source and BSD licenses. The solution supports tasks such as 3D localization and mapping, 3D road planning, subject and traffic signal detection, lane recognition, sensor calibration, and software simulation.

  • The Continuous Delivery Foundation advances CI/CD

    More organizations have matured from CI to CI/CD, but their paths differ as do their pipelines and results. Most enterprises are implementing a mix of open source, commercial and even home-grown tools, and they’re looking for answers.

    One place to look is the Continuous Delivery Foundation (CDF) which is home to many of the fastest-growing CI/CD open-source projects. The CDF fosters vendor-neutral collaboration among developers, end users and vendors to further best practices and industry specifications. DeployHub CEO and co-founder Tracy Ragan, who serves as the CDF general membership board representative, provides additional insight in this Q&A.

  • Continuous Delivery Foundation looks to build in Microsoft, further projects

    The Continuous Delivery Foundation is looking to draw in more members and projects as it heads towards its first birthday, with Microsoft top of the organisation’s hit list.

    The CDF formed back in March 2019, aiming to evangelize CI/CD as methodologies, and define/document best practices in and out of the cloud. Founder members included CloudBees and Google – it is home to the original Jenkins project, and Jenkins X, the Kubernetes-focused CI/CD platform, as well as the Google spawned Tekton.

Leaving Windows 7

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Ubuntu
  • Warning: Windows 7 is losing support, but so is this popular version of Ubuntu Linux!

    Windows 7 is a great operating system -- there is a reason so many computer users have clung to it. Well, we can also thank the terrible Windows 8 for scaring people from upgrading, I suppose. Windows 8.1 was better, and Windows 10 is actually pretty good, but neither are loved like Windows 7 is.

    Sadly, Microsoft is killing Windows 7 for most users -- it reaches end of life status in just two days, on January 14th. After that date, Windows 7 will be unsupported (except for businesses that choose to pay for extended support) -- you'd have to be a fool to continue using that operating system. You should upgrade to Windows 10 ASAP or switch to a Linux-based OS.

  • Windows 7, the "fresh" install

    I have a confession. For a few years I've had a Windows 7 box sitting on the shelf. Literally: sitting on a shelf, unconnected to anything, unused. I had bought it as a refurbished unit from an on-line retailer, to be my wife's PC, but I had to return it so many times for hardware problems that I finally bought her a refurb from a local store. Eventually the on-line retailer managed to send me a functioning -- but now superfluous -- unit, so I put it in storage. Who knows, maybe I'll need a Win 7 PC some day.

    When I learned that Windows 7 support is ending on January 14, 2020, I thought that I'd better activate and update that computer. So off the shelf, onto the desk, connect to the Internet, power up and go. Windows Update reported that my bare Win 7 Pro SP1 needed some 170 updates, which I accepted. About 17 failed, which I attributed to download errors; repeating Windows Update fixed all but 4.

    Ah, those four.

    Windows Update reported error codes 80092004 and 8050800c. The former, it seems, is due to a change in the SHA-2 signing of updates. Update 4490628 fixes this, but for some inscrutable reason Windows Update didn't install this essential update! So I had to go to the Microsoft Update Catalog and download and install it manually. (The Microsoft support page does not describe the procedure for manual installation, but I guessed that once I had downloaded the file, opening the Windows Explorer and double-clicking on the downloaded file would install it...and I was right.)

Trapping Code Inside Microsoft GitHub

Filed under
Development
Microsoft
  • Reinout van Rees: Github basic auth deprecation and jenkins

    Hm, that @nenskins user, that is our old jenkins instance talking to github somehow. Apparently through basic auth. Only... where? Most of the github traffic seemed to use just an access token. Jenkins calls that the secret text type. Basic auth is type username with password in jenkins.

    What it turned out to be was the github branch source plugin. This periodically looks at our github organisation to see if there are new projects or new branches that it missed. Normally github tells our jenkins when there's a new project or pull request or so.

    Ok, on to the jenkins settings for my organisation. The confusing thing here is that the "credentials" setting says this:

    Note that only "username with password" credentials are
    supported. Existing credentials of other kinds will be filtered out. This
    is because jenkins exercises GitHub API, and this last one does not
    support other ways of authentication.
    Huh? Github is refusing user/password basic auth, which is what this plugin only supports? I updated every plugin, but the problem still persisted.

  • VVVVVV from Terry Cavanagh has the source code opened up to celebrate the 10 year anniversary

    VVVVVV, the clever platformer from Terry Cavanagh where you reverse gravity instead of jumping has now be made open source.

    The open license doesn't cover the assets (icons, art, graphics or music) which are still under a proprietary license. So you will need some to play with it, which Cavanagh said you can get from the Make and Play Edition for personal use and that edition also has the tools to make levels.

Mozilla Censored Through Microsoft GitHub

Filed under
Microsoft
Moz/FF
  • webcompat.com Anonymous Reporting - Some context

    The first week of January, we had to disable anonymous reporting. GitHub in a two steps strike blocked webcompat-bot (which allows us to handle anonymous reporting) and finally the full web-bugs repo (which handles all the issues for webcompat.com). The reason for blocking was illegal content.

    Previous situation

    Anonymous reporting was open to everyone and we would moderate after the fact if the issue was really a liability for both GitHub or us. For the last 5 years, I guess the webcompat.com site was not known enough to not be a target of bots and the issues not regular enough. The situation has evolved.

    The fall: We missed one issue which needed to be moderated and deleted. It was in a public view for quite a long time. We need to review our process about that.

    [...]

    While anonymity or soft-anonymity is an important feature in our society, it also creates challenges in some contexts. Some of these issues are not only tied to anonymous reporting, but anonymous reporting makes it more difficult to have a direct discussion about them.

  • Open Letter to Indian IT Minister by Mozilla, GitHub, and Cloudflare: Release draft intermediary liability rules, assuage concerns voiced during public consultation

    Given the Indian government’s impending commitment to the Supreme Court to notify the intermediary liability amendments by January 15 2020, global internet organizations Mozilla, GitHub, and Cloudflare have penned an open letter to the Union Minister of Electronics & Information Technology, Shri. Ravi Shankar Prasad. The letter highlights significant concerns with the rules and calls for improved transparency by allowing the public an opportunity to see a final version of these amendments prior to their enactment.

Why and how to switch from Windows 7 to Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Because many people are not really aware of good alternatives outside of the Microsoft world and a lot of them don’t want to upgrade their existing machines to Windows 10 themselves, most of the current Windows 7 users will therefore automatically be inclined to purchase an entirely new computer as a replacement for their current system, as on each new system Windows 10 is already pre-installed which is of course more convenient. As a result many still usable but older computers will therefore unnecessarily end up in the garbage dump. However, there are lots of people, including myself, who have a problem with throwing away still perfectly working equipment, or just don’t want to make the switch to Windows 10 at all. And for these people it is very important to be educated that there are a lot of very user friendly Linux distributions that could bring back life into their old but trusted computer and give back a user experience as it was bought yesterday.

Linux really breathes new life into old equipment. While the relatively extensive Linux Mint is already running fine on old computers, you can get even more performance out of your ancient hardware by using a very light Linux distribution, such as Lubuntu, Zorin Lite or Linux Lite. My goal is to make as many current Windows 7 users as possible aware of what Linux has to offer and to what extent the purchase of a new computer may be postponed.

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Entrapment (Microsoft GitHub) and Distortion of Statistics

Filed under
Microsoft

5 Best Linux Distro for Windows users as alternatives- 2020

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

As we know in the year of 2020 Microsoft most probably going to end the Windows 7 support, thus it is a time to move on, right? So, there are two options either you upgrade to Windows 10 or prepare your self to experience something new in the form of Linux Distros.

Although you can use any Linux desktop environment which gives a familiar interface. However, it also important to see what kind of package management it uses and how many software are available for it, for example, Debian or Ubuntu with a wide range of packages.

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The Schism at the Heart of the Open-Source Movement

Filed under
Microsoft

Richard Schneeman is a software developer in Austin. Since 2012, he’s contributed to Ruby on Rails, an open-source coding software that GitHub has long used as part of its infrastructure. “Since I have contributed to Ruby on Rails, and I know that GitHub is using Ruby on Rails, I know that ICE is directly using my code,” he told me. “When I first found out, I was like, Oh, this has gotta be a mistake, right?”

In December, Schneeman signed an open letter alongside 2,000 other open-source contributors, who called the ICE contract a betrayal of open source’s commitment to “inverting power structures and creating access and opportunities for everyone.”

When reached for comment, a spokesperson for GitHub referred me to an October blog post from the company’s CEO and co-founder, Nat Friedman. The post acknowledges the work GitHub has done to connect and build users, but also points to a tension central to the open-source project. For a project to call itself “open source,” it can’t place restrictions on who can and cannot access it.

Friedman noted that although GitHub is an enormous part of the open-source community, its contract with ICE is for a different product, the GitHub Enterprise Server—a version of the typical GitHub platform retooled for the company using it. Data are hosted on the company’s own servers, access is restricted solely to its own employees, sharing is limited based on internal rules and regulations, and so on.

Friedman explained that GitHub doesn’t know the specifics of how ICE is using the Enterprise product. He maintained a distinction between the open-source repositories the platform is known for and ICE’s “private work” using the Enterprise software. As he argued, interrogating the agency or potentially terminating its contract would compromise Github’s core philosophy.

“A world where developers in one country or every country are required to tell us what type of software they are creating would, in our view, undermine the fundamental rights of software developers,” Friedman wrote in his blog post.

It’s important to note that GitHub has a code of conduct and has removed users from its site for violating those terms. Being unpopular is neither illegal nor a violation of the terms of service.

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Via: LWN

Your Full Guide on Migrating from Windows 7 to Linux

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Windows 7 was released a decade ago in 2009. A lot of people consider it to be the best Windows version Microsoft has ever made. Sadly Microsoft announced that Windows 7 will be disconnected in 14th of January, 2020. Being disconnected means that your OS will no longer receive updates, including security updates, at all. Which puts you in danger and under the pressure of switching to another OS as a lot of other apps will gradually stop working on Windows 7 too.

According to NetMarketShare (which is a very horrible source btw), 26% of desktop users are still using Windows 7, which is really huge considering that the OS will become out of service in few days. So, where to go from here? You could pay $100 to upgrade to Windows 10, which is very much heavier, full of data-collection mechanisms and adware. Or, you know, you could switch into using Linux, which is miles ahead of Windows in terms of almost everything.

This article will take you in detailed tour on why you should switch to Linux from Windows 7 (if you still haven’t), how to do it and everything else you may need to know.

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Proprietary Entrapment (Microsoft GitHub)

Filed under
Microsoft
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More in Tux Machines

VPN Providers with Custom Clients for Linux

Virtual Private Networking providers and company are more than you can shake a stick at these days. While there's always installable client software for Windows, Android and usually MacOS and whatever the mobile version is called not all are offering desktop clients for Linux distributions. Even if they do it's usually non-GUI, you know, with the excuse that Linux nerds love and want the power of the command line, with stripped-down functionality, or even a browser extension only which might work on a Chromebook but not on any other OS if you actually want to channel your entire traffic. And no, a proxy is not a replacement for a proper VPN. Another constraint is the various packaging formats Linux and GNU/Linux distributions are using. Most providers only offer packages for Debian and Ubuntu-like distributions. RPMs are typically Fedora and/or CentOS but do not work on SUSE. On other distributions like Slackware and Arch you're basically on your own. You can hope that someone has provided a build on sbopkg for Slackware or in the AUR for the Arch base or that it can be transformed with the alien packaging tool but these are not official packages. Then we have the issue of different init systems in use all over the Linux install base. When exploring Artix Linux I discovered that custom desktop client software is written to work with distributions that are using systemd to handle services and networking. Wanting to use them with OpenRC or Runit presents a bit of a challenge. It can be done but you got to know your init system's run levels or ask a distro developer to package it for you. Thankfully I since discovered that the software of at least two companies I'm perusing supports SysVinit. Their packages worked flawlessly on Devuan 3.0 so all is not lost if you're not running systemd but still want to use your providers client instead of the Networkmanager OpenVPN plugin. Even more so since NM does not seem to work without systemd, haha. They also play nicely with Wicd, no conflicts there. They're not integrated but they don't integrate with NM either. Read more

After Parler, Google Targets Blockchain-based ‘Free Speech’ Social Network Minds

Google Play Store sent a "24 hour warning" to Minds and they removed major functionality from the app. Minds is also working on a contingency plan to avoid meeting the same fate as Parler. Read more

today's leftovers

  • How one hacker's push to secure the internet became a crucial part of Mac, Linux, and Windows operating systems [Was: "How Jason A. Donenfeld created secure VPN WireGuard, included in Linux"
  • Fedora program update: 2021-02

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora this week. Self-Contained Change proposals for Fedora 34 are due by Tuesday 19 January. The mass rebuild begins on 20 January. Not next week, but normally I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • App Spotlight: Dictionary

    Among the easily installable and ad-free apps within the PureOS store is Dictionary. This is a simple tool that lets you search through numerous online or local dictionaries and translation sources.

  • Comet Lake-S appears on COM Express

    Portwell’s Linux-ready “PCOM-B655VGL” Basic Type 6 module features Intel’s up to 10-core, 10th Gen Comet Lake-S plus up to 32GB DDR4, 3x DDI, 4x SATA III, 4x USB 3.2 Gen2, and PCIe x16 and 8x PCIe x8 Gen3.

  • RetroPie booze barrel
  • 20 years of Drupal: Founder Dries Buytaert on API first, the end of breaking compatibility, and JavaScript bloat

    Content management system Drupal is 20 years old, prompting its founder to talk to about its evolving role, why it shifted from a policy of breaking compatibility with each release, and concerns about JavaScript bloat causing issues for those with poor connectivity. "When I started Drupal 20 years ago I built it for myself, for me with my friends," Buytaert told us. That was at the University of Antwerp, Belgium, in 2000. He wrote a small message board. When he graduated he put it on the web, intending to call it dorp, which is Dutch for village. He mistyped it as drop, creating drop.org. Drupal is derived from the English pronunciation of druppel, Dutch for drop. Buytaert is now project lead for Drupal and CTO of Acquia, a cloud platform for marketing sites.

  • What Can We Learn From SQL’s 50 Year Reign? A Story of 2 Turing Awards

    Many of the programming languages we use today were not introduced until the 90s (Java was introduced in 1996). However, there is one programming language that is still as popular today as it was when it was introduced nearly 50 years ago: SQL.

    This article will discuss the events that led to the introduction of relational databases, why SQL grew in popularity, and what we can learn from its success.

  • ScyllaDB NoSQL database to improve with Project Circe

    The open source SycllaDB NoSQL database continues to gain new features and users as it ramps up its plans for 2021. At the Scylla Summit 2021 virtual event which ran from Jan. 12-14, ScyllaDB CEO Dor Laor shared new features and the roadmap for the NoSQL database's future. A key part of ScyllaDB's roadmap is Project Circe, a yearlong initiative that aims to bring new performance and consistency to the database. The Summit was also highlighted by multiple users that outlined their ScyllaDB deployments, including Ticketmaster, Expedia Group, Zillow and GE Healthcare.

  • "Studio" Tour Of An Australian Linux Zoomer

    Ever wondered what my "studio" actually looks like outside of the normal shot, well today you can find out and I use the term studio very loosly, this is my bedroom with some lights set up but none the less it's a make shift studio and it's what I use to make 15+ videos a week.

  • DistroToot Is Now Accepting New Members

    DistroToot is my own personal Mastodon instance. Mastodon is a decentralized, federated micro-blogging platform. Essentially, it is a free and open source Twitter. People have asked me if I would open up DistroToot to accept other members (not just myself).

Software: DUF, Systemd Applet, and PDF

  • duf - Disk Usage/Free Utility for Linux, BSD, macOS & Windows - nixCraft

    We use the df command to show how much disk space is free on mounted file systems in Linux, macOS, and Unix-like systems. We also have the du command to estimate file space usage. We now have another fancy and fantastic looking tool called duf to display statistics on free disk space in Unix, Linux, macOS, *BSD, Android, and Windows written in Golang.

  • Systemd Applet Release - Michael Jansen, Drive By Coding

    Given no one seems to be interested in working on the applet (boo) I decided to tackle the bug myself. Apparently the fact it worked previously was the result of happenstance. The systemd manager processes only send out signals after at least one process told them to do so. It seems that some process did that on my computer before but no more.

  • 5 Best free PDF editors for Ubuntu Linux in 2021 [Ed: Some of these are proprietary software, which GNU/Linux users do not need for any practical reason]

    PDF readers and editors are a popular part of our day-to-day work related to documents, ebooks, presentations, whitePaper, and more because of PDF’s portability and security. However, when it comes to reader application for PDF files, you will generally find a one on Linux desktop systems, easily. However, PDF editors may still need to be installed, which are available only a handful. Adobe developed the PDF (portable document format) in such a way that it can present the layout in the final document as it is, anywhere, regardless of the OS system or software in which you are going to use it later. Therefore, editing PDF files afterward is not an easy task- apart from the standard note and comment functions. However, Adobe offers a professional PDF editor for Mac and Windows but that also has limited capabilities. This means we can edit all PDF files not thoroughly like we do Word documents.