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Microsoft

A Grand Experiment

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft
BSD

The latest debacle over the "forced" upgrade to Windows 10 and Apple's increasingly locked-in ecosystem has got me thinking. Do I really need to use a proprietary operating system to get work done? And while I'm at it, do I need to use commercial cloud services to store my data?

I've always used Linux since the first time I tried installing Slackware in the mid-90s. In 1998 we were the first national TV show to install Linux live (Red Hat). And I've often advocated Ubuntu to people with older computers. I usually have at least one computer running Linux around, in the past couple of years Dell XPS laptops have been great choices. And a couple of months ago I bought a 17" Oryx laptop from System76, an Ubuntu system integrator, for use in studio.

But as time went by, even Ubuntu began to seem too commercial to me, and I've migrated to community supported Debian testing and the Arch-based Antergos distros for everything. (i use Antergos on my Oryx on the shows.)

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Also: Microsoft lays off remaining handful of Microsoft Press staff

Wine 1.9.15

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Microsoft
Software

GNU/Linux Desktop

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Intel Developer Has Been Working On Systemd Support For Chrome OS

    Google's Chrome OS currently relies upon Upstart as its init system, but work done by an Intel developer is pushing towards systemd support.

  • The Linux Setup - Jerry Bezencon, Linux Lite

    My name is Jerry Bezencon and I’m a technology consultant, investor, programmer and promoter of/advocate for free and open source software.

  • Microsoft ordered to fix 'excessively intrusive, insecure' Windows 10

    A French regulator has issued Microsoft a formal warning over Windows 10, saying the operating system collects excessive amounts of personal data, ships that information illegally out of the EU, and has lousy security.

    The warning comes from the Commission Nationale de l'Informatique et des Libertés (CNIL), an independent data privacy watchdog with the power to levy fines against companies. The CNIL has been investigating Windows 10 since its launch and has now drawn up a damning list of criticisms.

    "The CNIL has decided to issue a formal notice to Microsoft Corporation to comply with the Act within three months," said the group on Wednesday.

    "The purpose of the notice is not to prohibit any advertising on the company's services but, rather, to enable users to make their choice freely, having been properly informed of their rights. It has been decided to make the formal notice public due to, among other reasons, the seriousness of the breaches and the number of individuals concerned."

Feral Linux users should learn when to shut up

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

The very words alpha in the name of the release indicate that the Skype which was announced on 14 July is not ready for prime time. That should be apparent to anyone with the IQ of the common cockroach.

But it is apparently not evident to some Linux users.

Things do not seem to be clear to some so-called Linux writers, either. Here is one claiming that "The Skype for Linux alpha does not have all the features that will be released into the final version."

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7 Differences Between Linux and Windows: User Expectations

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Linux
Microsoft

When I was a boy, I imagined that other languages were codes, whose words had a one-to-one correspondence to English. In the same way, many Windows users expect Linux to be an exact equivalent.

The reality, of course, is quite different. Both Windows and Linux are operating systems -- the programs used to run other applications -- but they often fulfill basic functions in different ways. Like any application, they have their own unspoken logic, and part of learning either is to learn their logic.

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'Good' Microsoft

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Microsoft
  • Europe Is Going After Google Hard, and Google May Not Win

    Microsoft pulled the strings.

    At least, that’s what Google and so many business and tech journalists said when the search giant first faced antitrust complaints in Europe six years ago. And indeed, Microsoft had filed one of those complaints. It was also the money-wielding mastermind behind the Initiative for a Competitive Online Marketplace, a group that lobbied the European Union and helped others bring complaints against arch-rival Google. But all these years later, Microsoft has removed itself from the fight, reaching an agreement with Google that says both companies will drop all regulatory complaints against each other. And yet, Google’s antitrust problems are only getting worse.

  • Study Backed By Microsoft Corporation (MSFT) Claims Enterprises Can Save Millions by Switching To Windows 10 [Ed: Forrester ‘Research’ is again being paid by Microsoft to lie to the public. Previously for anti-Linux too. Microsoft propaganda being framed as ‘study’ to promote malware.]

    Microsoft Corporation (NASADQ:MSFT) has backed a study conducted by Forrester Research...

  • Windows 10 a failure by Microsoft's own metric – it won't hit one billion devices by mid-2018

    When Windows 10 launched, Microsoft claimed it would have the new operating system on a billion devices by mid-2018. That isn't going to happen, however, Redmond has now admitted.

  • One in five consumers upgraded to Win10 for free instead of buying a PC

    Microsoft’s free upgrade of Windows 10 hit PC makers where it hurt though the extent of this was apparently a surprise to the software giant, data druids at Gartner have claimed.

    According to a survey by the holders of the Magic Quadrant, one in five consumers that upgraded to the free version of the OS decided they didn’t actually need to replace their client after all.

Microsoft silently kills dev backdoor that boots Linux on locked-down Windows RT slabs

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft has quietly killed a vulnerability that can be exploited to unlock ARM-powered Windows RT tablets and boot non-Redmond-approved operating systems.

The Register has learned that one of the security holes addressed this week in the July edition of Microsoft's Patch Tuesday closes a backdoor left in Windows RT by its programmers during its development.

That backdoor can be exploited to unlock the slab's bootloader and start up an operating system of your choice, such as GNU/Linux or Android, provided it supports the underlying hardware.

Read more [Ed: Microsoft LOOOOOOOVES Linux]

Microsoft and Openwashing

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Microsoft

Unity on Malware

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu
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Linux 4.7 and Linux 4.8

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Ubuntu MATE 16.04.1 LTS Fixes the Raspberry Pi Partition Resizer, Adds MATE 1.14

As part of the Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS (Xenial Xerus) announcement, Martin Wimpress informs us about the release of the Ubuntu MATE 16.04.1 LTS operating systems for users of Ubuntu MATE 16.04 LTS. Ubuntu MATE 16.04.1 LTS is not a major release, and if your Ubuntu MATE 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) installation is up to date, you already have the latest software updates and security patches that have been injected in the new installation mediums generated mainly for those who want to reinstall or deploy the OS on new systems. Read more