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Microsoft

Latest Microsoft Propaganda About 'Open' and EEE Tactics, FUD

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Microsoft
OSS

Windows 10 Sends Your Activity History to Microsoft, Even if You Tell It Not To

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Microsoft

Windows 10 collects an “Activity History” of applications you launch on your PC and sends it to Microsoft. Even if you disable or clear this, Microsoft’s Privacy Dashboard still shows an “Activity History” of applications you’ve launched on your PCs.

This problem was recently discussed on Reddit, and it’s pretty easy to confirm. Head to Settings > Privacy > Activity History and disable “Send my activity history to Microsoft.” It was already disabled on our PC, so it made this easy to test.

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Microsoft's Latest Attempt at Stopping People From Using Chrome

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Google
Microsoft
OSS
Web
  • Microsoft is building Edge on top of Chromium (open source version of Google Chrome

    It is official now. Microsoft is throwing away old code base of Edge browser and making next version of Edge browser on top of Chromium. The open source project behind Google Chrome is known as Chromium. Microsoft is building a Chromium browser to replace Edge on Windows 10 on both x86 and ARM-based systems.

  • Microsoft Edge: Making the web better through more open source collaboration [Ed: This is Microsoft. Whose browser was always proprietary. Whose abuses on the WWW are well documented. Yeah, lecture us now on "open source collaboration" (not freedom).]
  • Microsoft's Edge browser moving to Chromium
  • Microsoft Confirms Edge will use Chromium Rendering Engine, Launches Insider Program
  • Goodbye, EdgeHTML

    Microsoft is officially giving up on an independent shared platform for the internet. By adopting Chromium, Microsoft hands over control of even more of online life to Google.

    This may sound melodramatic, but it’s not. The “browser engines” — Chromium from Google and Gecko Quantum from Mozilla — are “inside baseball” pieces of software that actually determine a great deal of what each of us can do online. They determine core capabilities such as which content we as consumers can see, how secure we are when we watch content, and how much control we have over what websites and services can do to us. Microsoft’s decision gives Google more ability to single-handedly decide what possibilities are available to each one of us.

Openwashing, Entryism and Failure

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Microsoft

Microsoft's Latest EEE Against Chrome is Becoming a Proprietary Clone

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Microsoft
Web
  • Microsoft is building a Chromium-powered web browser that will replace Edge on Windows 10

    Microsoft's Edge web browser has seen little success since its debut on Windows 10 back in 2015. Built from the ground up with a new rendering engine known as EdgeHTML, Microsoft Edge was designed to be fast, lightweight, and secure, but launched with a plethora of issues which resulted in users rejecting it early on. Edge has since struggled to gain any traction, thanks to its continued instability and lack of mindshare, from users and web developers.

  • Is Microsoft Planning To Replace Edge With A Chromium-based Browser?

    Microsoft Edge, despite its features and improvements in recent years, has failed to perform well in the market — Google Chrome is one of the biggest reasons behind it. According to rumors, Microsoft is planning to tackle the issue by developing a Chromium-based web browser that would replace Edge.

    Windows Central has reported that Microsoft is working on a project codenamed as ‘Anaheim‘ for building a browser based on Chromium, which is an open source web browser project initiated by Google.

  • Edge gets Chrome-plated, and we're all worse off

    I used to think that WebKit would eat the world, but later on I realized it was Blink. In retrospect this should have been obvious when the mobile version of Microsoft Edge was announced to use Chromium (and not Microsoft's own rendering engine EdgeHTML), but now rumour has it that Edge on its own home turf -- Windows 10 -- will be Chromium too. Microsoft engineers have already been spotted committing to the Chromium codebase, apparently for the ARM version. No word on whether this next browser, codenamed Anaheim, will still be called Edge.

  • Microsoft is reportedly ditching Edge on Windows 10 for a Chrome-based browser

    Whether you’re using Google Chrome, Opera, or Brave to browse the web, under the hood, it’s all based on Chromium. Chrome’s Blink engine has become more-or-less the de facto way to render the web. Microsoft has long tried to avoid that fact by constantly working on Internet Explorer then Edge, but it seems no more. Microsoft is reportedly embracing Chrome’s dominance with a new replacement browser for Windows 10.

    Windows Central is reporting that Microsoft is in the early stages of a project, codenamed “Anaheim”, that is currently slated to replace Microsoft Edge for Windows 10. Instead of continuing to use the company’s EdgeHTML engine, Anaheim will reportedly be built upon Chrome’s open source Blink engine.

Another Typical Day of Microsoft Broken 'Patches' and Downtimes

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Microsoft

Microsoft: Bad Ideas, Antitrust Abuses, and More Broken 'Updates' for Windows

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Microsoft
  • What Was the Windows Briefcase Used For, Anyway?

    The Windows Briefcase was introduced in Windows 95 and was the Dropbox of its day. It’s still part of Windows 7, but was deprecated in Windows 8 and is no longer part of Windows 10.

  • Capitalism, Competition And Microsoft Antitrust Action

    In 1994 Microsoft settled with the Department of Justice, agreeing to refrain from tying the sale of other Microsoft products to the sale of Windows. It is reasonable to assume that the demise of Apple, Microsoft's only significant competitor in desktop computer operating systems, would have increased the antitrust scrutiny on Microsoft.

  • Windows 10 Version 1809 Breaks Windows Media Player

    As if there weren’t already enough problems with this release, Windows 10 version 1809 breaks Windows Media Player too.

    “After installing this update, users may not be able to use the Seek Bar in Windows Media Player when playing specific files,” a Microsoft support document notes. “Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release.”

  • Microsoft Re-Releases Windows Cumulative Update KB 4469342 For Version 1809, Fixes Old Issues

    Microsoft Windows 10 version 1809 has been under a lot of criticism and the company has been working tirelessly to fix the issues. In another attempt to fix the issues faced by Windows 10 version 1809 users, Microsoft has re-issued a cumulative update KB 4469342 for the version 1809. The tech giant had released the cumulative update earlier at the start of the month.

  • Microsoft Fixes Windows 10’s File Association Bug, Unless You’re Using the October Update

    On November 27, Microsoft released a “cumulative update” for Windows 10 that fixes a variety of bugs. As Bleeping Computer notes, Microsoft says the problem that prevents some Windows users from setting their default applications is fixed. Unfortunately, the Windows Media Player bug is still not fixed.

Microsoft Does What Microsoft Does

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Microsoft
  • New era for Japan, familiar problems: Microsoft withdraws crash-tastic patches

    Stop us if you've heard this one, but Microsoft has pulled a couple of buggy patches in Office. It also left a crash-worthy Outlook security fix in place.

    The two non-security patches were part of this month's Patch Tuesday, both for Office 2010. The patches in question were supposed to support Japan's upcoming epochal turnover.

    Last year, Japanese Emperor Akihito announced that he would abdicate in favour of his son, Naruhito. As Microsoft explained in this blog post, that will bring the "Heisei era"* to a close, something that's never happened "in the history of .NET" – meaning a calendar transition would be needed.

  • Microsoft leaks cause of Windows 10 October Update File Deletion bug

    A week ago Microsoft posted a two thousand word self-congratulatory blog post on how each bi-yearly Windows Update was better than the last, with happier users and fewer issues each time.

    This is despite users becoming increasingly wary of updating their PCs with more and more reports of serious and crippling bugs end users are often left to deal with.

    The blog post was exactly the opposite of what users were expecting – an explanation of what happened and of how Microsoft would prevent it from happening again.

Everyone gets fired for choosing Microsoft, not Red Hat (IBM)

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
Microsoft
  • Up in the clouds: where next for IBM stock after Red Hat acquisition?
  • Microsoft confirms: We fixed Azure by turning it off and on again. PS: Office 362 is still borked

    Microsoft is recovering somewhat from a bad case of the Mondays that left some of its subscribers unable to use multi-factor authentication to log into their cloud services.

    The Redmond giant said that around 2130 UTC today it had managed to get its Azure Cloud back up and running as per normal. Meanwhile, Office 364 is still being knocked into shape by the Windows giant's techies.

    Azure and the cloud-based Office suite started playing up at 0439 UTC, meaning multi-factor authentication has been knackered for about 17 hours, preventing unlucky users from logging in.

    Over the weekend, Azure's DevOps services were also a little wobbly, we note.

    [...]

    This is after many, but not all, punters have spent most of the day unable to log-in to their Microsoft-hosted services via multi-factor authentication. The outages were felt worldwide, beginning in the afternoon of Monday in Asia, and carrying on into Europe's start-of-the-week, and into the Americas as unlucky users found themselves unable to use their two-factor gizmos to log in.

    For security reasons, multi-factor authentication is highly recommended in order to prevent password-stealing hackers from hijacking accounts.

    Now, with Asia nearly ready to get up and start its Tuesday workday, Microsoft has yet to fully resolve its Office 359 login headaches. Passwords also cannot be reset by users.

  • MFA failure hits Microsoft cloud services globally

    Microsoft cloud customers using multi-factor authentication have been locked out of their accounts since Monday morning US time, the company's own status pages indicate.

  • Azure and Office 365 down as Microsoft suffers MFA borkage

Special 'Fun' With Apple’s iCloud and Microsoft's 'Cloud'

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Microsoft
Mac
  • Windows 10’s October Update Breaks Apple’s iCloud

    Windows 10’s October 2018 Update has more bugs. Microsoft won’t offer the update if you have iCloud installed, and Apple won’t let you install iCloud if you’ve already upgraded. You’ll also have trouble if you have F5 VPN software installed.

    This information comes from Microsoft’s own Windows 10 Update History page, where Microsoft is publicly tracking the October Update’s bugs.

    According to Microsoft, Apple iCloud version 7.7.0.27 has an incompatibility with the latest update. You’ll have trouble updating or synchronizing Shared Albums after upgrading. If you try installing iCloud on the October Update, you’ll see an error message saying “iCloud for Windows requires Windows 7, Windows 8, or Windows 10 (April 2018 Update) and earlier.”

  • Microsoft limits functionality for older versions of the Office: Enterprise users to suffer additional subscription costs

    Initially launched as a whole suite for businesses of all kinds, Microsoft Office 365 came out back in 2011, introducing a cloud based software service. Before this, Microsoft only focused on corporate software on the cloud, which was very limited. Since then, Office 365 has gained quite the customer satisfaction, considering it is used in almost all universities for education, in corporate firms, in households, with their sharing plans and otherwise. While this was a good way of revenue generation, Microsoft went a step further, when it launched the new Office 2019 this past September.

    While this new Office opens up features for the users, it also puts a nail in the way for Corporations that have found ways around office subscriptions, limiting them to an older version in order to get full functionality. Microsoft steps in this time around, with the release of their latest version of the Office platform.

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More in Tux Machines

ODROID-XU4: Much Better Performance Than The Raspberry Pi Plus USB3 & Gigabit Ethernet @ $60

Hardkernel recently sent over the ODROUD-XU4 for benchmarking. This ARM SBC that just measures in at about 82 x 58 x 22 mm offers much better performance than many of the sub-$100 ARM SBCs while also featuring dual USB 3.0 ports, Gigabit Ethernet, eMMC storage, and is software compatible with the older XU3 ARM SBCs. Here's a look at the performance of the ODROID-XU4 compared to a variety of other single board computers. This ~$60+ ARM single board computer is built around a Samsung Exynos5422 SoC that features four Cortex-A15 cores at 2.0GHz and four Cortex-A7 cores at 1.3GHz while the graphics are provided by a Mali-T628. Read more

Six-port network appliance runs Linux on Atom C3558

Acrosser’s compact “AND-DNV3N2” networking appliance runs Linux on a quad-core, 2.2GHz Atom C3558 and offers a SATA-III bay, 2x mini-PCIe and USB 3.0 ports, and 6x GbE ports, two of which can be outfitted as fiber SFP ports. Acrosser, which says it is now an Intel IoT Solutions Alliance partner, announced a desktop network appliance available with 6x copper Gigabit Ethernet ports or 4x GbE and 2x fiber-optic SFP ports. Like Advantech’s 6x port FWA-1012VC appliance, the AND-DNV3N2 Micro Box Networking Appliance runs on a quad-core, 2.2GHz Atom C3558 “Denverton” server SoC. (The Advantech model also sells an 8-port variant with an octa-core C3758.) Read more

today's leftovers

  • Director v1.6.0 is available
    Icinga Director v1.6.0 has been released with Multi-Instance Support, Configuration Baskets and improved Health Checks. We’re excited to announce new features that will help you to work more efficiently.
  • Fedora Looks To Build Firefox With Clang For Better Performance & Compilation Speed
    Following the move by upstream Mozilla in switching their Linux builds of Firefox from being compiled by GCC to LLVM Clang, Fedora is planning the same transition of compilers in the name of compilation speed and resulting performance. FESCo Ticket 2020 laid out the case, "Mozilla upstream switches from gcc to clang and we're going to follow upstream here due to clang performance, maintenance costs and compilation speed. Tom Stellard (clang maintainer) has asked me to file this ticket to comply with Fedora processes."
  • Work in progress: PHP stack for EL-8
  • Sandwich-style SBC offers four 10GbE SFP+ ports
    SolidRun’s “ClearFog CX 8K” SBC is built around a “CEx7 A8040” COM Express Type 7 module that runs Linux on a quad -A72 Armada A8040. Features include 4x 10GbE SFP+ ports and mini-PCIe, M.2, and SATA expansion. In August, SolidRun updated its ClearFog line of Linux-driven router boards with a high-end ClearFog GT 8K SBC with the same 2GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A72 Marvell Armada A8040 SoC found on its MacchiatoBIN Double Shot Mini-ITX board. Now, the company has returned to the headless (no graphics) Armada A8040 with the ClearFog CX 8K. [..] It’s rare to see an Arm-based Type 7 module.
  • Watch Out: Clicking “Check for Updates” Still Installs Unstable Updates on Windows 10
    Microsoft hasn’t learned its lesson. If you click the “Check for Updates” button in the Settings app, Microsoft still considers you a “seeker” and will give you “preview” updates that haven’t gone through the normal testing process. This problem came to everyone’s attention with the release of the October 2018 Update. It was pulled for deleting people’s files, but anyone who clicked “Check for Updates” in the first few days effectively signed up as a tester and got the buggy update. The “Check for Updates” button apparently means “Please install potentially updates that haven’t gone through a normal testing process.”

OSS Leftovers

  • DAV1D v0.1 AV1 Video Decoder Released
    Out today is DAV1D as the first official (v0.1) release of this leading open-source AV1 video decoder. This release was decided since its quality is good enough for use, covers all AV1 specs and features, and is quite fast on desktop class hardware and improving for mobile SoCs.
  • PikcioChain plans for open-source MainNet in roadmap update
    France-based PikcioChain, a platform designed to handle and monetize personal data, has announced changes to its development roadmap as it looks towards the launch of its standalone MainNet and block explorer in the first quarter of 2019.
  • New Blockstream Bitcoin Block Explorer Announces The Release Of Its Open Source Code Esplora
    Blockstream has just announced a release of Esplora, its open source software. This is the software that keeps the website and network running. This new release follows on the heels of its block explorer that was released in November to the public. The company released the block explorer, and after making sure it was successful, released the code behind that block explorer. This way, developers can easily create their block explorers, build add-ons and extensions as well as contribute to Blockstream.info.
  • Will Concerns Break Open Source Containers?
    Open source containers, which isolate applications from the host system, appear to be gaining traction with IT professionals in the U.S. defense community. But for all their benefits, security remains a notable Achilles’ heel for a couple of reasons. First, containers are still fairly nascent, and many administrators are not yet completely familiar with their capabilities. It’s difficult to secure something you don’t completely understand. Second, containers are designed in a way that hampers visibility. This lack of visibility can make securing containers extremely taxing.
  • Huawei, RoboSense join group pushing open-source autonomous driving technology
    Telecommunications equipment giant Huawei Technologies, its semiconductor subsidiary HiSilicon and RoboSense, a maker of lidar sensors used in driverless cars, have become the first Chinese companies to help establish an international non-profit group that supports open-source autonomous driving projects. The three firms are among the more than 20 founding members of the Autoware Foundation, which aims to promote collaboration between corporate and academic research efforts in autonomous driving technology, according to a statement from the group on Monday. The foundation is an outgrowth of Autoware.AI, an open-source autonomous driving platform that was started by Nagoya University associate professor Shinpei Kato in 2015.
  • 40 top Linux and open source conferences in 2019
    Every year Opensource.com editors, writers, and readers attend open source-related conference and events hosted around the world. As we started planning our 2019 schedules, we rounded up a few top picks for the year. Which conferences do you plan to attend in 2019? If you don't see your conference on this list, be sure to tell us about it in the comments and add it to our community conference calendar. (And for more events to attend, check out The Enterprisers Project list of business leadership conferences worth exploring in 2019.)
  • Adding graphics to the Windows System for Linux [Ed: CBS is still employing loads of Microsoft boosters like Simon Bisson, to whom "Linux" is just something for Microsoft to swallow]/
  • Kong launches its fully managed API platform [Ed: Typical openwashing of APIs, even using the term "open source" where it clearly does not belong]g
  • How Shared, Open Data Can Help Us Better Overcome Disasters
    WHEN A MASSIVE earthquake and tsunami hit the eastern coast of Japan on March 11, 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant failed, leaking radioactive material into the atmosphere and water. People around the country as well as others with family and friends in Japan were, understandably, concerned about radiation levels—but there was no easy way for them to get that information. I was part of a small group of volunteers who came together to start a nonprofit organization, Safecast, to design, build, and deploy Geiger counters and a website that would eventually make more than 100 million measurements of radiation levels available to the public. We started in Japan, of course, but eventually people around the world joined the movement, creating an open global data set. The key to success was the mobile, easy to operate, high-quality but lower-cost kit that the Safecast team developed, which people could buy and build to collect data that they might then share on the Safecast website.