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Security

Reason 373 to dump Windows: the WMF Flaw

Filed under
Security

Why should you dump Windows for Linux?

Well, there's Microsoft's security-hole-of-the-month-club, which far too many people have got compliants about.

And then there's the WMF (Windows Metafile Format) hole.

This may turn out to be the root cause of the worst Windows security problem ever.

Phishers now targetting SSL

Filed under
Security

Information theft scammers are increasingly spoofing SSL certificates in a bid to fool Web users, Netcraft reports.

D@TA Protection and the Linux Environment

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Security

Organizations that gather and store critical information have to protect it. While there are tried and true techniques for data protection, there are also new and innovative ones. These new practices and tools greatly enhance an organization's ability to protect mission-critical data. Linux and Open Source users are specially challenged when trying to take advantage of much of this new technology.

How secure is your computer?

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Security

StillSecure attached six computers - loaded with different versions of the Windows, Linux and Apple's Macintosh operating systems - earlier this month to the Internet without anti-virus software.

The results show the Internet is a very rough place.

New worm for Linux

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Security

This morning a new worm for Linux appeared on the Internet. This is the second worm in the last couple of months. (The one before this one, Lupper, appeared on 7th November 2005). This shows how relatively rare Linux worms are in comparison to Windows worms.

Linux Kernel Socket Data Buffering Denial of Service

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Security

A vulnerability has been reported in the Linux Kernel, which can be exploited by malicious, local users to cause a DoS (Denial of Service).

Why Do They Want My Phone Number?

Filed under
Security

On the checkout line this holiday season, make sure you have everything on your gift list, your cash or credit card ready -- and, oh yeah, get set for one more thing.

"Can I have your phone number, please?"

Warning toned down on Perl app flaws

Filed under
Security

The Perl Foundation has toned down a warning on a type of vulnerability commonly found in applications written in the Perl programming language.

Packetstorm in a teacup; Firefox still secure

Filed under
Moz/FF
Security

The first exploit for Mozilla Firefox 1.5 was discovered by Packetstorm last week. However initial reports that Packetstorm's hack could completely disable Firefox seem grossly exaggerated.

Preventing Buffer Overflow Exploits Using the Linux

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Security

Internet servers (such as Web, email, and ftp servers) have been the target for different kinds of attacks aiming to disable them from providing services to their respective users.

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