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Security

The Open-Source Question

Filed under
OSS
Security

You’d be forgiven for thinking that the tech world is a loathsome hotbed of rapacious venture capitalists, airheaded trend-riders, and publicity hounds. That’s the image presented by much of the tech press, which prizes stories about the Montgomery Burnses of the tech world over ones about its more idealistic denizens.

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Security Onion: A Linux Distro For IDS, NSM, And Log Management

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Security Onion is a Linux distribution for intrusion detection, network security monitoring, and log management. It’s based on Ubuntu and contains Snort, Suricata, Bro, Sguil, Squert, Snorby, ELSA, Xplico, Network Miner, and many other security tools. Security Onion is a platform that allows you to monitor your network for security alerts. It’s simple enough to run in small environments without many issues and allows advanced users to deploy distributed systems that can be used in network enterprise type environments.

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Network Security Toolkit Is Based on Fedora 20 Using Linux Kernel 3.18.5

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat
Security

The famous Network Security Toolkit (NST) computer operating system used by many network administrators and security specialists to analyze and monitor networks, as well as to tighten the security of computer networks, received an update on February 9, 2015. The version is now Network Security Toolkit 20 SVN 6535.

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Answering the Call for Werner Koch’s Everywhere

Filed under
GNU
Security

This past week the person who manages one of the world’s most important cryptography projects, Werner Koch, went from going broke to raising more than $100,000 for his project, GNU Privacy Guard. This is in addition to the $60,000 The Linux Foundation’s Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII) dedicated to Werner last month. GnuPG is used not just to encrypt and authenticate email but provides the confirmation that software packages and releases are what they claim to be. Facebook, Stripe and others are answering the calls to support the individuals who are developing the world’s most critical digital infrastructure.

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GNU C Library 2.21 Released With Bug & Security Fixes

Filed under
GNU
Security

Version 2.21 of the GNU C Library is now available. Glibc 2.21 fixes a lot of issues while also adding some new functionality.

Glibc 2.21 has many bug fixes, several security fixes, a port to the Altera Nios II platform, a new sempahore algorithm, support for TSX lock elision on PowerPC, optimized string functions for AArch64, support for new MIPS ABI extensions, and many other changes.

More details on glibc 2.21 can be found via the mailing list release announcement. Other GNU C Library 2.21 details can be found via the Sourceware.org Wiki.

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Two things I’ve learned from using Tor Browser

Filed under
OSS
Security

So for the past three months I’ve been using Tor Browser to surf the Web, not as a primary browser, but as a secondary browser. Firefox is my primary browser.

Together with using StartPage as my search engine, I feel much better about my privacy while surfing the Internet. Using Tor Browser leads to a tad slower browsing experience, but I knew that going in, so no complaints there.

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The World’s Email Encryption Software Relies on One Guy, Who is Going Broke

Filed under
GNU
Security

The man who built the free email encryption software used by whistleblower Edward Snowden, as well as hundreds of thousands of journalists, dissidents and security-minded people around the world, is running out of money to keep his project alive.

Werner Koch wrote the software, known as Gnu Privacy Guard, in 1997, and since then has been almost single-handedly keeping it alive with patches and updates from his home in Erkrath, Germany. Now 53, he is running out of money and patience with being underfunded.

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Preventing a DNS Leak and WebRTC Leak when using Tor in Linux

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Security

Using Tor alone will not prevent the so-called DNS Leak problem. If your Web browser is not configured correctly your Linux installation will still use your ISP’s DNS servers instead of the DNS servers favoured by Tor, in which case your ISP will know which sites you are accessing.

Good and Samsung Partner to Harden Android Security

Filed under
Android
Security
Gadgets

The two biggest issues regarding Android's security are the size of the Android market and fragmentation of the Android ecosystem. Those issues impact all mobile platforms, not just Android, according to Charles King, principal analyst at Pund-IT. "The former point is an issue since, as Microsoft learned to its sorrow with Windows," King remarked.

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Life-cycle of a Security Vulnerability

Filed under
Red Hat
Security

Security vulnerabilities, like most things, go through a life cycle from discovery to installation of a fix on an affected system. Red Hat devotes many hours a day to combing through code, researching vulnerabilities, working with the community, and testing fixes–often before customers even know a problem exists.

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More in Tux Machines

World’s smallest i.MX6 module has onboard WiFi, eMMC

Variscite unveiled a 50 x 20mm “DART-MX6″ module that runs Linux or Android on the Freescale i.MX6, with up to 64GB eMMC flash and -40 to 85°C support. Variscite’s claim that the 50 x 20mm DART-MX6 is the world’s smallest computer-on-module based on Freescale’s i.MX6 system-on-chip appears to be a valid one. It beats the smallest ones we’ve seen to date: TechNexion’s 40 x 36mm PICO-IMX6, and Solid-Run’s 47 x 30mm microSOM i4. It’s also just a hair larger than Variscite’s own 52 x 17mm DART-4460, which is based on a dual-core TI OMAP4460 SoC, and Gumstix’s slightly larger 58 x 17mm Overo modules, which use TI Sitara AM37xx SoCs. Read more