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Security

Run the Kali Linux Penetration Testing Distro on Any Platform via Docker Images

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

At the request of many users, the Kali Linux developers are proud to announce the immediate availability of Docker images for the Kali Linux operating system, helping users run Kali on various OSes.

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IPFire 2.17 Update 90 Gets GeoIP-Based Blocking, Legacy Microsoft Hyper-V Support

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

The IPFire team had the pleasure of announcing earlier today, May 28, the immediate availability for download of IPFire 2.17 Core Update 90, a major version that brings a number of new features, updated packages, a new kernel, and various security enhancements.

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Security and Linux

Filed under
Linux
Security

Is your open source security software less secure?

Filed under
OSS
Security

"Your secure software is open source; doesn't that make it less secure?"

This is a recurring question that we get at Benetech about Martus, our free, strongly encrypted tool for secure collection and management of sensitive information built and provided by the Benetech Human Rights Program. It's an important question for us and for all of our peers developing secure software in today's post-Snowden environment of fear and worry about surveillance. We strongly believe not only that open source is compatible with digital security, but that it's also essential for it.

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Malware is not only about viruses – companies preinstall it all the time

Filed under
GNU
Security

In 1983, when I started the free software movement, malware was so rare that each case was shocking and scandalous. Now it’s normal.

To be sure, I am not talking about viruses. Malware is the name for a program designed to mistreat its users. Viruses typically are malicious, but software products and software preinstalled in products can also be malicious – and often are, when not free/libre.

In 1983, the software field had become dominated by proprietary (ie nonfree) programs, and users were forbidden to change or redistribute them. I developed the GNU operating system, which is often called Linux, to escape and end that injustice. But proprietary developers in the 1980s still had some ethical standards: they sincerely tried to make programs serve their users, even while denying users control over how they would be served.

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Security News

Filed under
Linux
Security
  • Oracle Patches the Venom Security Issue in All Supported VirtualBox Branches
  • Is SELinux good anti-venom?

    Dan Berrange, creator of libvirt, sums it up nicely on the Fedora Devel list:

    "While you might be able to crash the QEMU process associated with your own guest, you should not be able to escalate from there to take over the host, nor be able to compromise other guests on the same host. The attacker would need to find a second independent security flaw to let them escape SELinux in some manner, or some way to trick libvirt via its QEMU monitor connection. Nothing is guaranteed 100% foolproof, but in absence of other known bugs, sVirt provides good anti-venom for this flaw IMHO."

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • DDoS reflection attacks are back – and this time, it's personal

    At the start of 2014, attackers' favorite distributed denial of service attack strategy was to send messages to misconfigured servers with a spoofed return address – the servers would keep trying to reply to those messages, allowing the attackers to magnify the impact of their traffic.

  • Another HTTPS Vulnerability Rattles The Internet

    Another HTTPS vulnerability has started to make its rounds earlier this morning. Dubbed Logjam by its researchers, the vulnerability stems from the US's encryption export mandate back in the 1990s. This particular vulnerability, in the transport-layer security layer protocol, breaks the Diffie-Hellman perfect forward-secrecy. Susceptibility to the vulnerability is depended on servers and clients supporting the DHE_EXPORT encryption scheme, or using a key less-than-or-equal to 1024 bits.

Tails 1.4 Linux Distro Fixes Security Flaws, Focuses on Privacy

Filed under
Security
Debian

Tails first achieved notoriety as the Linux distribution that National Security Agency whistleblower Ed Snowden used. Tails, an acronym for The Amnesic Incognito Live System, is focused on enabling user privacy while online. On April 29, 2014, the Tails 1.0 debuted, and it has been steadily updated ever since. Tails 1.4 launched May 12 of this year with a number of new capabilities, including several important security updates. Among the big changes in Tails 1.4 is a new privacy-focused search tool called Disconnect. Tails 1.4 also enables users to print a paper copy of their privacy keys using the Paperkey tool. A core part of every Tails release is the included Tor browser, which benefits from an update in Tails 1.4 that fixes a number of recently disclosed security vulnerabilities. There are times when the Tor browser isn't enough, and users need a regular browser to get access to a service, which is why Tails 1.4 also includes an Unsafe Browser, as well. In this slide show, eWEEK examines key features of the Tails 1.4 release.

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CoreOS Aims to Help Secure OpenStack Clouds

Filed under
Linux
Security

Brian "Redbeard" Harrington, principal architect at CoreOS, discusses the intersection of containers and the cloud.

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Serious Red Hat Linux Bug Affects Haswell-based Servers

Filed under
Red Hat
Security

A recent post by Gil Tene raises the importance of an important, little known patch to Linux kernels that should be reviewed by all users and administrators of Linux systems, especially those who utilize Haswell processors. Tene reports that in particular users of Red Hat-based distributions (including CentOS 6.6 and Scientific Linux 6.6) should apply the patch as soon as possible. Even if your instance of Linux is running in a VM, that VM is most likely hosted on a Haswell machine if is on the popular cloud providers (Azure / Amazon /etc) and would benefit from the patch.

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More in Tux Machines

Systemd Is Launching Its Own Conference

Lennart Poettering today announced systemd.conf 2015, its inaugural conference devoted to the future of systemd. Read more

Opinion Poll (latest update)
systemd usage I use systemd and like it: 787 (30%) I use systemd and dislike it: 318 (12%) I am not using systemd and plan to use it: 111 (4%) I am not using systemd and plan to avoid it: 1170 (44%) Other: 260 (10%)

Linux 4.2 May Finish Fixing Up Radeon Audio Support

Since the Linux 4.0 kernel there has been DisplayPort audio support for the open-source Radeon driver. That DP audio handling came after a big rework to the audio code in the Radeon DRM kernel driver. A half-year later it looks like all the audio code is now cleaned up and ready. Read more Also: Radeon Gallium3D Tackles A Bit More, OpenGL 4.1 Patches Pending NVIDIA 352.30 GPU Driver For Linux Has Been Released

LibreOffice 5.0 Right Around the Corner, Guided Tour of LibreOffice

  • LibreOffice 5.0 Right Around the Corner
    Major release LibreOffice 5.0 is due next Wednesday with a lot of new features. Italo Vignoli today posted The Road to LibreOffice 5.0 in which he looks back at all the added features since January 2015 with version 3.3. Today's summary shows "the impressive amount of new features added to LibreOffice since version 3.3." LibreOffice 3.3 was released in January 2011. This release was significant in that the development and management of LibreOffice had come together in a short time and put out a release that brought several new features. SVG support, easier title and page formatting and numbering, improved ergonomics in Calc, and Microsoft Works support were among the newest features added by The Document Foundation.
  • A Guided Tour of LibreOffice
    I have been using LibreOffice since it was called Star Office and all documents opened in a tabbed interface, as in most modern spreadsheet applications (anyone remember those days?). From those early days until now, I have considered Star Office/OpenOffice.org/LibreOffice to be an excellent, if not superior, tool compared to many on the market.

CoreOS CEO: Security is fundamental

In an interview, CEO Alex Polvi claims his company invented the cloud-native OS category and discusses how CoreOS's update strategy differs from the likes of Red Hat Read more