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Security

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • On reCAPTCHA Dread

    I wanted to read Matthew Garrett’s post on Intel’s remote AMT vulnerability, but since I’m using Private Internet Access, Cloudflare has gated it behind reCAPTCHA. reCAPTCHA is much, much harder than it used to be. Although there seem to be a couple of other variants, nowadays you’re generally expected to identify squares that contain street signs and squares that contain mountains. Now either the answer key is regularly wrong, or I just don’t know what street signs and mountains are. You’d think the former… but there actually is a good degree of ambiguity in selecting which squares to tag. Do I only tag all the squares that contain the signage-portion of the sign, or do I also tag the squares containing the signpost? (The former seems to work better, in my experience.) What if only a little bit of the sign extends into a particular square? (Jury’s out.) What if there are very distant signs in the background of the image, with many big signs in the foreground: should the distant signs be tagged too? And what constitutes a mountain anyway? Most of the “mountains” I see in the reCAPTCHA images look more like impressive hills to me. My guess is that reCAPTCHA wants me to tag any bit of elevated land as a mountain, but who knows, really.

  • Remote security exploit in all 2008+ Intel platforms

    The short version is that every Intel platform with AMT, ISM, and SBT from Nehalem in 2008 to Kaby Lake in 2017 has a remotely exploitable security hole in the ME (Management Engine) not CPU firmware. If this isn’t scary enough news, even if your machine doesn’t have SMT, ISM, or SBT provisioned, it is still vulnerable, just not over the network. For the moment. From what SemiAccurate gathers, there is literally no Intel box made in the last 9+ years that isn’t at risk. This is somewhere between nightmarish and apocalyptic.

  • Vulnerability hits Intel enterprise PCs going back 10 years
  • 6 signs enterprise security is getting better [Ed: This Microsoft employee will not want to say it, but shift away from Windows contributes to security]

More on Intel Back Doors

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Hardware
Security
  • Intel's remote AMT vulnerablity

    Intel chipsets for some years have included a Management Engine, a small microprocessor that runs independently of the main CPU and operating system. Various pieces of software run on the ME, ranging from code to handle media DRM to an implementation of a TPM. AMT is another piece of software running on the ME, albeit one that takes advantage of a wide range of ME features.

  • Intel Active Management Technology, Intel Small Business Technology, and Intel Standard Manageability Escalation of Privilege
  • Intel patches remote code-execution bug that lurked in chips for 10 years

    Remote management features that have shipped with Intel processors for almost a decade contain a critical flaw that gives attackers full control over the computers that run on vulnerable networks. That's according to an an advisory published Monday afternoon by Intel.

    Intel has released a patch for the vulnerability, which resides in the chipmaker's Active Management Technology, Intel Small Business Technology, and Intel Standard Manageability. Business customers who buy computers running vPro processors use those services to remotely administer large fleets of computers. The bug doesn't affect chips running on consumer PCs. The chipmaker has rated the vulnerability critical and is recommending vulnerable customers install a firmware patch.

Intel Back Doors

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Hardware
Security
  • Intel Confirms Vulnerability In Intel AMT/ME

    Many of you already have expressed your displeasure over Intel's Active Management Technology (AMT) and Management Engine (ME) for various reasons in the past and now it's been disclosed that for years there has been a vulnerability in this business-oriented feature that could open your Intel systems up to attackers.

    Intel Active Management Technology, Intel Small Business Technology, and Intel Standard Manageability are subject to a hole allowing an unprivileged attacker to gain control of the management features for these products. The issue was made public today via INTEL-SA-00075.

  • Secure Boot booted from Debian 9 'Stretch'

    Debian's release team has decided to postpone its implementation of Secure Boot.

    In a release update from last week, release team member Jonathan Wiltshire wrote that “At a recent team meeting, we decided that support for Secure Boot in the forthcoming Debian 9 'stretch" would no longer be a blocker to release. The likely, although not certain outcome is that stretch will not have Secure Boot support.'

Security Leftovers

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Security

Ubuntu 12.04 and SSHv1 Support Phased Out

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Security
  • Ubuntu 12.04 (Precise Pangolin) End of Life reached on April 28, 2017

    This is a follow-up to the End of Life warning sent last month to confirm that as of today (April 28, 2017), Ubuntu 12.04 is no longer generally supported. No more package updates will be accepted to the 12.04 primary archive, and it will be copied for archival to old-releases.ubuntu.com in the coming weeks.

  • OpenSSH Removes SSHv1 Support

    Dropping support for SSHv1 and associated ciphers that were either suspected to or known to be broken has been planned for several releases, and has been eagerly anticipated by many in the OpenBSD camp.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security fail is people

    The other day I ran across someone trying to keep their locker secured by using a combination lock. As you can see in the picture, the lock is on the handle of the locker, not on the loop that actually locks the door. When I saw this I had a good chuckle, took a picture, and put out a snarky tweet. I then started to think about this quite a bit. Is this the user's fault or is this bad design? I'm going to blame bad design on this one. It's easy to blame users, we do it often, but I think in most instances, the problem is the design, not the user. If nothing is ever our fault, we will never improve anything. I suspect this is part of the problem we see across the cybersecurity universe.

  • Free software activities in April 2017

    Whilst anyone can inspect the source code of free software for malicious flaws, most software is distributed pre-compiled to end users.

    The motivation behind the Reproducible Builds effort is to permit verification that no flaws have been introduced — either maliciously or accidentally — during this compilation process by promising identical results are always generated from a given source, thus allowing multiple third-parties to come to a consensus on whether a build was compromised.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Is there any way to truly secure Docker container contents?

    All this adds up to a lot of work, which is not taken care of for you by default in Docker. It is no surprise that many Docker images are insecure, given this picture. The unfortunate reality is that many Docker containers are running with known vulnerabilities that have known fixes, but just aren’t, and that’s sad.

  • Compromise recovery on Qubes OS

    Occasionally fuckups happen, even with Qubes (although not as often as some think).

    What should we – users or admins – do in such a situation? Patch, obviously. But is that really enough? What good is patching your system if it might have already been compromised a week earlier, before the patch was released, when an adversary may have learned of the bug and exploited it?

    That’s an inconvenient question for many of us – computer security professionals – to answer. Usually we would mutter something about Raising the Bar(TM), the high costs of targeted attacks, attackers not wanting to burn 0-days, or only nation state actors being able to afford such attacks, and that in case one is on their list of targets, the game is over anyway and no point in fighting. Plus some classic cartoon.

    While the above line of defense might work (temporarily), it really doesn’t provide for much comfort, long term, I think. We need better answers and better solutions. This post, together with a recently introduced feature in Qubes OS 3.2 and (upcoming) 4.0, is an attempt to offer such a solution.

  • Top 5 Kali Linux Pentest tools for WiFi/network and exploits
  • Linux/Shishiga Malware Brute-Forces SSH Credentials

    A new strain of Linux malware has been detected. Dubbed Linux/Shishiga, the malware could transform into a dangerous piece of malware. Linux/Shishiga was officially discovered and examined by researchers at Eset.

  • Cybercriminals have taken notice of leaked government spying techniques
  • Microsoft Closes Word/Wordpad Hole—6 Months after Report
  • [Older] The Pentagon’s Bug Bounty Program Should Be Expanded to Bases, DOD Official Says [iophk: "any version of Windows at all is inappropriate"]

    “About 75 percent of the devices that are control systems are on Windows XP or other nonsupported operating systems,” said Daryl Haegley, program manager for the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Energy, Installations and Environment.

    [...]

    “A lot of these systems are still Windows 95 or 98, and that’s OK—if they’re not connected to the internet,” Haegley added.

  • Don’t Info Op Until You See The Whites of Their Eyes
  • CFP P70

    This is the official CFP for P70.

  • VM escape - QEMU Case Study

    In this paper, we provide a in-depth analysis of CVE-2015-5165 (a memory-leak vulnerability) and CVE-2015-7504 (a heap-based overflow vulnerability), along with working exploits. The combination of these two exploits allows to break out from a VM and execute code on the target host. We discuss the technical details to exploit the vulnerabilities on QEMU's network card device emulation, and provide generic techniques that could be re-used to exploit future bugs in QEMU.

  • CIA’s anti-leaking tool leaked as ‘whistleblowers watch the watchers’

    Former MI5 intelligence officer Annie Machon and retired US Army Colonel Ann Wright, who is also a retired US State Department official, shared their views on these and other questions with RT.

    On Friday, WikiLeaks released a series of documentations on a US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) project known as ‘Scribbles,’ which was allegedly created to allow ‘web beacon’ tags to be embedded “into documents that are likely to be copied.”

    WikiLeaks began publishing a huge cache of secret documents on the CIA named ‘Vault 7’ in March.

  • Vault 7: CIA tool to track people through Word docs released

    The documentation says: "Scribbles (SCRIB) is a document watermarking tool that can be used to batch process a number of documents in a pre-seeded input directory. It generates a random watermark for each document, inserts that watermark into the document, saves all such processed documents in an output directory, and creates a log file which identifies the watermarks inserted into each document."

    It says the tool was successfully tested on Office 2013 (on Windows 8.1 x64), documents from Office versions 97-2016 (Office 95 documents will not work!) and documents that are not locked forms, encrypted, or password-protected.

    There is a limitation to the Scribbles system: if a document that has the watermarks in it and is opened in OpenOffice, LibreOffice the watermark images and URLs may become visible.

  • The US Takes On the World in NATO’s Cyber War Games

    Last year, Capt. Sean Ruddy and his team of operator-soldiers from the US Cyber Brigade entered a Locked Shields, a NATO-organized cyber-defense war game that pits teams from dozens of countries against “live-fire” attacks. It was their first time. And of the 19 countries represented, the US finished dead last. This week, they got their shot at redemption.

More Security Leftovers

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Security
  • HardenedLinux: The way to the Ark

    We’ve been sharing some of our works on security practices ( STIG-4-Debian, Debian GNU/Linux profiles, etc) for servers running in data center. PaX/Grsecurity is the corner stone to most of our solutions. Evidences have revealed that PaX/Grsecurity can defeat multiple public exploits w/o any patch fixes in critical scenarios for a long run. With PaX/Grsecurity, for the 1st time we believe that we can build the defense based on free/libre & open source software/firmware solution to prevent many threats from Ring 3/0/-1/-2/-3. HardenedLinux is going to continue develop solutions of defense based on PaX/Grsecurity. From our point of view, we see no other option. Please remember this date: Apr 26 2017. This is the day we lost our Ark.

  • It's Official: Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) Linux OS Reached End of Life

    Canonical, through Adam Conrad, informed us today that the Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) operating system is now officially dead, reaching end of life on April 28, 2017.

    If you're still using Ubuntu 12.04 LTS on your desktop or server systems, it's time to upgrade to a newer, supported release. You can choose to upgrade to either Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), which will be supported for two more years, until April 2019, or Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), supported until April 2021.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

IPFire 2.19 Now Supports On-Demand IPsec VPNs, Core Update 110 Is Now Available

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

IPFire's Michael Tremer announced today, April 28, 2017, the release of IPFire 2.19 Core Update 110, a new stable maintenance version of the open-source, Linux-based firewall operating system.

Coming two and a half months after the previous point release, IPFire 2.19 Core Update 110 is here to implement support for on-demand IPsec (Internet Protocol Security) VPNs (Virtual Private Networks), which might just come in handy to those who deal with a huge amount of IPsec net-to-net connections on their infrastructures.

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LinuxAndUbuntu Distro Review Of The Week - Deepin OS

​Depth/Deepin OS is not just another Linux Distro, but one with something new to show. Deepin OS is simply speaking, just beautiful. Deepin OS, formerly known as Deepin, Linux Deepin, and Hiweed GNU/Linux is a Linux distro with an identity crisis. Seriously, this distro has undergone name changes you always have to check twice if the name is still the same. And that is all the negative you are going to say about this distro. Honestly speaking, Deepin OS is surely going to blow you away. I have been keeping an eye on this distro since 2013 and it still manages to impress me. Read more

KDE Leftovers: digikam, KDevelop, Kate, GSoC, and Akademy

  • [digikam] Call to Test the Pre-Release of 5.6.0
    Once again a lot has been going on behind the scenes since the last release. The HTML gallery tool is back, database shrinking (e.g. purging stale thumbnails) is also supported on MySQL, grouping has been improved and additional sidecars can now be specified. Therefore the release of 5.6.0 will be (is already) delayed, as we would like to invite you to test all these features. As usual they are available in the pre-release bundles or obviously directly from the git repository. Please report any dysfunctions, unexpected behaviour or suggestions for improvement to our bug tracker.
  • KDevelop runtimes: Docker and Flatpak integration
    On my last blog post I discussed about how some assumptions such as the platform developed on can affect our development. We need to minimize it by empowering the developers with good tools so that they can develop properly. To that end, I introduced runtimes in our IDE to abstract platforms (much like on Gnome’s Builder or Qt Creator).
  • Kate 17.04.1 available for Windows
  • GSoC - Community Bonding Period with Krita
  • First month report: my feelings about gsoc
  • My Akademy Plans
    The Akademy programme (saturday, sunday) is actually pretty long; the conference days stretch into feels-like-evening to me. Of course, the Dutch are infamous for being “6pm at the dinner table, and eat potatoes” so my notion of evening may not match what works on the Mediterranean coast. Actually, I know it doesn’t since way back when at a Ubuntu Developer Summit in Sevilla it took some internal-clock-resetting to adjust to dinner closer to midnight than 18:00.

Gaming News: Shogun, SteamOS, Dawn Of War III