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Security

ASUS Eee PC rooted out of the box

Filed under
Security

risesecurity.org: We recently acquired an ASUS Eee PC. The first thing we did when we put our hands at the ASUS Eee PC was to test its security.

Mass attack on Apache servers running Linux can be stopped by disabling server's dynamic loading

Filed under
Security

scmagazineus.com: Security vendor SecureWorks reported this week that the mass attack launched against Apache web servers running on the open-source Linux operating system can be thwarted by disabling dynamic loading in the Apache configuration.

Mozilla says that flaw could lead to data leak

Filed under
Moz/FF
Security

LinuxWorld: Mozilla is working to fix a browser flaw that could give attackers unauthorized access to data on a victim's machine.

Also: Super Techies: Brendan Eich

Cybercriminals moving beyond Microsoft to Apple and Linux

Filed under
Security

iTWire: A new report reveals that in 2007 organised criminal gangs for the first time started attacking Internet connected Apple products with the intention of stealing money. The report issues a chilling warning that the increased popularity of Mac computers and the enthusiastic take-up of net connected products such as iPhone and iPod Touch has its down side.

lies and statistics.

Filed under
Security

htmlfixit.com: Secunia have reported that more flaws were found in Redhat Linux (633) than in Windows (123), but even a blind man can see it is nowhere near a fair comparison.

SSH: Best Practices

Filed under
Linux
Security
HowTos

Are you using SSH in the best way possible? Have you configured it to be as limited and secure as possible? The goal of this document is to kick in the new year with some best practices for SSH: why you should use them, how to set them up, and how to verify that they are in place. All of the examples below assume that you are using EnGarde Secure Linux but any modern Linux distribution will do just fine since, as far as I know, everybody ships OpenSSH.

Red Hat and Firefox more buggy than Microsoft?

Filed under
Security

techworld.com: Secunia has found that the number of security bugs in the open source Red Hat Linux operating system and Firefox browsers far outstripped comparable products from Microsoft last year.

Top FOSS security vulnerabilities

Filed under
Security

linux.com: Palamida, the San Francisco company that helps companies to audit their use of open source software, has released a list of what it calls "the top five most overlooked open source vulnerabilities." To this list, Palamida has added an additional five vulnerabilities exclusively for Linux.com.

SourceForge hacked, but not to worry(?)

Filed under
Security

Matt Asay: Valleywag reports that SourceForge.net was hacked Wednesday, resulting in site downtime while SourceForge tracked down the hacker. SourceForge's Ross Turk confirms the report.

Also: Can Sourceforge marketplace open the cash drawer?

SELinux sparks tussle over Linux security model

Filed under
Linux
Security

GCN: While most security specialists would agree on the high quality of SELinux, proponents are arguing this framework is the only one that should be needed for the open-source operating system kernel. In fact, it would eliminate the need for the Linux Security Module, an open platform for outsider developers to build their own security frameworks for Linux. And this idea has raised the ire of Linux keeper Linus Torvalds.

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel 3.18 development – the kernel column

Linus Torvalds announced Linux 3.17, the Shuffling Zombie Juror, saying, “The past week was fairly calm, and so I have no qualms about releasing 3.17 on the normal schedule”. The latest kernel includes a number of nice headline features, such as the new getrandom() system call and sealed files APIs that we covered in previous issues of LU&D. Linux 3.17 also includes support for less highlighted new features, such as new signature checking of kexec()’d kernel images and sparse files on Samba file systems (which is significant for those mounting Windows and Mac shares). Read more

Qt 5.4 Release Candidate Available

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Weston's IVI Shell Sees New Version

There hasn't been much in the way of exciting Wayland/Weston developments to report on this month, but its development is continuing in its usual manner. Out today is another version of the Weston IVI Shell as it still works to being accepted upstream. The weston-ivi-shell is a reference shell for Wayland's Weston compositor running on In-Vehicle Infotainment (IVI) systems. The Weston-IVI work dates back many months and today's revision to the shell marks its eighth public version as it still seeks to be accepted into mainline Weston. Read more

Python 3 Support Added To The GNOME Shell

The GNOME Shell 3.15.2 release fixes some visual glitching, improves the layout of the extension installation dialog, supports the CSS margin property, and offers other bug fixes and minor enhancements. Most notable to GNOME Shell 3.15.2 though is there's finally Python 3 support. Many GNOME components have long ported their Python 2 code to Python 3 while GNOME Shell's Python support has just received the Py3 treatment. Details on GNOME's overall Python 3 porting work can be found via this Wiki page. Read more