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Security

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Friday's security updates
  • Major web security company sought to conceal that it ran compromised servers

    A controversy has erupted today at London security conference 44CON as details emerge of U.S. security company FireEye’s attempts to stifle any public disclosure of a major series of vulnerabilities in its suite – all of which have now been patched.

    The vulnerabilities are said to have included the default use of the ‘root’ account on a significant number of the Apache servers providing services to FireEye’s clients.

  • GM Took 5 Years to Fix a Full-Takeover Hack in Millions of OnStar Cars

    When a pair of security researchers showed they could hack a Jeep over the Internet earlier this summer to hijack its brakes and transmission, the impact was swift and explosive: Chrysler issued a software fix before the research was even made public. The National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration launched an investigation. Within days Chrysler issued a 1.4 million vehicle recall.

  • John McAfee: For today, for the future — here’s why I’m running for president

    The last few days have been amazing. I am humbled by the outpouring of support and encouragement that I have received. I did 27 interviews yesterday and today looks to be about the same. I have found that the issues we are bringing up are resonating. America cares about these things. Officially, my complete presidential platform is forthcoming, but I wanted to share on Digital Trends a number of reasons why I am running for president and founding a party.

Security Leftovers

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Security

Internet Bug Bounty Helps Secure Open Source and the Internet [VIDEO]

Filed under
OSS
Security

Alex Rice spent five-and-half years working as head of product security at Facebook before he helped found HackerOne, provider of a platform that enables organizations to run bug bounty programs. At HackerOne, Rice has teamed with his former employer as well as Microsoft to help sponsor and operate the Internet Bug Bounty.

Rice explained that the Internet Bug Bounty covers approximately a dozen open source projects that are critical to the functioning of the Internet, including PHP, perl, Python, Ruby, OpenSSH and others. Such projects typically don't have the resources to run their own bug bounty programs, Rice said.

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security advisories for Tuesday
  • SELinux insides – Part2: Neverallow assertions
  • Researchers have disclosed severe security flaws within the firm's products over the holiday weekend.

    Ormandy's disclosures were made at the same time another researcher's findings, Kristian Erik Hermansen, were posted online. Hermansen publicly disclosed a zero-day vulnerability within cyberforensics firm FireEye's security product, complete with proof-of-concept code.

  • Seagate drives at risk of data theft over hidden 'root' account

    A public vulnerability disclosure warns that an attacker could remotely download files from an affected hard drive, thanks to the hard-coded default password.

  • HP Drops Support For Hacking Competition As Wassenaar Arrangement Continues To Make Computing Less Safe

    An international agreement to treat certain software as weaponized is well on its way towards making computing less safe. Recent changes to the Wassenaar Arrangement -- originally crafted to regulate the sale of actual weapons -- have targeted exploits and malware. The US's proposed adoption of the Arrangement expands on the definitions of targeted "weapons," threatening to criminalize the work done by security researchers. While the Arrangement will likely have little effect on keeping weaponized software out of the hands of blacklisted entities, it could easily result in a laptop full of security research being treated like a footlocker full of assault weapons.

  • Duo Security Research Reveals Half of Apple iPhones on Corporate Networks Run Out-of-Date Versions of iOS

    Duo Security, a cloud-based access security provider protecting the world's largest and fastest growing companies, today announced results from a Duo Labs research study focusing on mobile devices on corporate networks. Unpatched and end-of-life devices that are no longer supported by the manufacturer are much more prevalent than expected and create significant risk for corporate networks. The Duo Labs research draws on data gathered from thousands of customer deployments in more than 150 countries worldwide.

  • TSA Master Keys

    Someone recently noticed a Washington Post story on the TSA that originally contained a detailed photograph of all the TSA master keys. It's now blurred out of the Washington Post story, but the image is still floating around the Internet. The whole thing neatly illustrates one of the main problems with backdoors, whether in cryptographic systems or physical systems: they're fragile.

  • A Tale of Three Backdoors

    The tale of three backdoors: TSA locks, the CALEA interface, and the Dual_EC PRNG, all amply illustrate the dangers posed by backdoors in systems. For backdoors may fail catastrophically, degrade national security, and can potentially be used against those who demanded the backdoors in the first place. The scars born by the security field in dealing with failed backdoors provides ample illustration why we find the idea of backdoors troubling and dangerous.

[Debian] reproducible builds are a waste of time

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Security
Debian
  • reproducible builds are a waste of time

    Yesterday I read an article on Motherboard about Debian’s plan to shut down 83% of the CIA with reproducible builds. Ostensibly this defends against an attack where the compiler is modified to insert backdoors in the packages it builds. Of course, the defense only works if only some of the compilers are backdoored. The article then goes off on a bit of a tangent about self propagating compiler backdoors, which may be theoretically possible, but also terribly, unworkably fragile.

    I think the idea is that if I’m worried about the CIA tampering with Debian, I can rebuild everything myself from source. Because there’s no way the CIA would be able to insert a trojan in the source package. Then I check if what I’ve built matches what they built. If I were willing to do all that, I’m not sure why I need to check that the output is the same. I would always build from scratch, and ignore upstream entirely. I can do this today. I don’t actually need the builds to match to feel confident that my build is clean. Perhaps the idea is that a team of incorruptible volunteers will be building and checking for me, much like millions of eyeballs are carefully reviewing the source to all the software I run.

    The original source document doesn’t actually mention deployment of the whacked SDK, just research into its development. Perhaps they use it, perhaps they rejected it as being too difficult and risky. Tricking a developer into using a whacked toolchain leaves detectable traces and it’s somewhat difficult to deny as an accident. If we assume that the CIA has access to developer’s machines, why not assume they have access to the bug database as well and are mining it for preexisting vulnerabilities to exploit? Easy, safe, deniable.

  • Debian Reproducible Builds to Detect Spyware

    Debian has been getting a lot of attention the last couple of days for Jérémy Bobbio's work on Reproducible Builds. Bobbio has been working on this idea and implementation for a couple of years now, but after a presentation at Chaos Communication Camp last month it's come back into focus. In other Debian news, updates 8.2 and 7.9 were released.

  • Debian Linux versus the CIA

    Hidden backdoors into software have long been a concern for some users as government spying has increased around the world. Now the Debian project has taken aim at the CIA and other government spy agencies with reproducible builds that aim to stop hidden backdoors.

Debian Security

Filed under
Security
Debian

How to Install and run Kali Linux on any Android Smartphone

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux
Security
HowTos

Kali Linux is one the best love operating system of white hat hackers, security researchers and pentesters. It offers advanced penetration testing tool and its ease of use means that it should be a part of every security professional’s toolbox.

Penetration testing involves using a variety of tools and techniques to test the limits of security policies and procedures. Now a days more and more apps are available on Android operating system for smartphones and tablets so it becomes worthwhile to have Kali Linux on your smartphone as well.

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Improving Security for Bugzilla

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Moz/FF
Security

Openness, transparency, and security are all central to the Mozilla mission. That’s why we publish security bugs once they’re no longer dangerous, and it’s why we’re writing a blog post about unauthorized access to our infrastructure. We have notified the relevant law enforcement authorities about this incident, and may take additional steps based on the results of any further investigations.

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Google Chrome Turns Seven, Advances with Security and Performance Gains

Filed under
Google
Security

After seven years of development, Google continues its rapid pace of release and enhancement for its Chrome browser. On the seventh anniversary of the first Chrome public release on September 2, Google released Chrome stable version 45 and Chrome beta 46.

Google Chrome debuted on September 2, 2008 after months of speculation about Google's intentions regarding entering the browser market. The first Chrome browser entered the market at a time when Microsoft's IE still dominated, though Firefox was making a dent in that market share. Today, according to multiple sets of stats, including Statcounter, Google Chrome stands as the world's most popular web browser.

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