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Security

Securing Your Server With A Host-based Intrusion Detection System

Filed under
Linux
Security
HowTos

This article shows how to install and run OSSEC HIDS, an Open Source Host-based Intrusion Detection System. It performs log analysis, integrity checking, rootkit detection, time-based alerting and active response. It helps you detect attacks, software misuse, policy violations and other forms of inappropriate activities.

How To Combat Viruses Using Your Postfix Configuration

Filed under
Linux
Security
HowTos

In this guide you will learn how to tweak your Postfix/Amavisd setup to give better virus protection. If you want to achieve business grade virus protection you need to do a few small things so that there is less chance of the latest greatest script kiddie invention getting through. Therefore this tutorial shows how to install and use ClamAV, F-Prot, and McAfee UVScan.

Red Hat Champions Security Vulnerabilities Forum

Filed under
Security

Red Hat today announced its continuing commitment to superior security services with a new initiative, implemented by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), that enables members of the software industry to officially and publicly comment on vulnerabilities.

Reveal The Holes In Your Webserver

Filed under
Software
Security
Web

Nikto is an advanced web vulnerability scanner, which can help you expose the potential holes in your webserver (and thus allow you to fix them before malicious users attempt to exploit them). This guide will show you how to use its advanced scanning features to expose holes in your webserver which you never knew existed!

Disk Encryption Tools for Linux and benchmark results

Filed under
Security

Your computer running Linux somehow ran into a hardware glitch and had to be hauled to the neighborhood Computer service center. And you are asked to leave the machine at the service center and come back after a couple of days so that the technician can have a good look at it. But you are a bit worried because the harddisk contains the blue prints of the most secret project you are currently working on.

OpenOffice hits back at viral risk claims

Filed under
Security

OpenOffice.org has hit back at claims that the alternative office applications suite is riddled with security holes. Researchers at the French Ministry of Defense say that OpenOffice is subject to security weaknesses that make it at least as susceptible to computer viruses as the commercial, more widely used, Microsoft Office.

Researchers: OpenOffice.org Security 'Insufficient'

Filed under
Security

With Microsoft's Office suite now being targeted by hackers, researchers at the French Ministry of Defence say users of the OpenOffice.org software may be at even greater risk from computer viruses.

Defending Against New Rootkits That Beat BSD, Linux, Mac, Vista, AMD and Intel

Filed under
Security

“The idea behind Blue Pill is simple,” says Joanna Rutkowska of invisible things. “Your operating system swallows the Blue Pill and it awakes inside the Matrix.”

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More in Tux Machines

Eclipse Luna for Fedora 20

If you are a Fedora Eclipse user, then you're probably saddened since the release of Eclipse Luna (4.4) because you are still using Eclipse Kepler (4.3) on Fedora 20. Well, be saddened no longer because Eclipse Luna is now available for Fedora 20 as a software collection! A software collection is simply a set of RPMs whose contents are isolated from the rest of your system such that they do not modify, overwrite or otherwise conflict with anything in the main Fedora repositories. This allows you install multiple versions of a software stack side-by-side, without them interfering with one another. More can be read about this mechanism on the software collections website. The Eclipse Luna software collection lives in a separate yum repository, which must be configured by clicking on this link to install the release package. Read more

Patch By Patch, LLVM Clang Gets Better At Building The Linux Kernel

With each kernel revision, LLVM Clang gets closer to being able to build the mainline Linux kernel. There's now just a few dozen patches outstanding for LLVMLinux to be a mainline success. Behan Webster gave his usual talk at LinuxCon in Chicago this week about the state of LLVMLinux -- building the Linux kernel with Clang rather than GCC. There's been many Phoronix articles about the topic so there isn't too much more to share beyond that many developers want to use Clang to compile the Linux kernel to lead to better code portability of the kernel, faster compilation times of Clang, potential performance differences, LLVM and Clang are more liberally licensed, and there's a host of other development extras with Clang. Read more

Today in Techrights

Wayland and Weston 1.6 alpha snapshot (1.5.91)

release plan continues as follows: - two weeks to let the alpha version stabilize, and only merge small features along with bug fixes - RC1 release on September 5th, Friday - bugfixing - RC2 release on September 12th, Friday - hopefully no more bugfixing much - 1.6.0 release on September 19th, Friday - at some point later master branch opens again for all new things. Read more