Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Security

Ubuntu Touch to Support Encryption of User Data

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu Touch operating system is also going to provide support for encryption of user data; developers have revealed.

It wasn’t a secret that Ubuntu Touch will get encryption, but it’s also not listed as an upcoming feature. It’s buried in a wiki entry with plans for Ubuntu Touch, but it’s nice to see that it’s still being considered, even if it’s not going to arrive anytime soon.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu ‘Spyware’ Will Be Disabled In Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Tails 1.8.2 is out

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security
Debian

This release fixes numerous security issues. All users must upgrade as soon as possible.

Read more

Also: Debian LTS Work December 2015

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Friday's security updates
  • Hackers caused a major blackout for the first time

    Hackers were behind a cyber attack on Ukraine in December that had real offline consequences: A blackout that killed electricity to roughly 700,000 homes.

    On December 23, around half the homes in Ukraine's Ivano-Frankivsk region lost power for at least a few hours. Initially reported in Ukrainian media as being caused by hackers, cybersecurity experts have now confirmed that was the case, saying the power company was infected with malicious software.

  • Finland extradites Russian hacking suspect to US

    US authorities are to escort Maxim Senakh out of Finland within a month. They suspect him of stealing millions of dollars from infected computer servers in the US, Finland and elsewhere.

  • Linux Ransomware creators third time unlucky as researchers crack encryption again

    Researchers find Linux.Encoder 3 version still uses buggy encryption and allows file recovery

    Much to the delight of security researchers, a group of malware creators are currently having difficulty getting cryptographic implementations right in their ransomware. This has not happened once but thrice.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • SHA-1 Deprecation: Pro, Con, or Extend?

    I read Ryan's article about why SHA-1 should be deprecated faster and why we should veto the proposed extensions. It is an excellent explanation of what's going on. I highly recommend it (and look forward to the complete series when he publishes it):

  • Legacy Verified: Legacy Solutions

    While the previous post explored the historical context in which the SHA-1 deprecation fits, and in the many failures to respond adequately to known risks, it didn’t really address the actual Legacy Verified proposal made by CloudFlare and Facebook, and subsequently endorsed by Twitter, nor how it attempts to mitigate the concerns with continuing SHA-1 allocation.

  • Let’s Encrypt Now Being Abused By Malvertisers

    Encrypting all HTTP traffic has long been considered a key security goal, but there have been two key obstacles to this. First, certificates are not free and many owners are unwilling to pay; secondly the certificates themselves are not always something that could be set up by a site owner.

  • Security Guide: How to Protect Your Infrastructure Against the Basic Attacker
  • Linux.Encoder Authors Couldn’t Correctly Disguise Encryption Key

    Renowned Security Software Company in Russia named Doctor Web happened to be first to detect as well as report one wholly working ransomware Trojan created to infect Linux computers. A sample named Linux.Encoder.1 recently showed quite resembling activity with the notorious CryptoWall ransomware. Fifty percent of the widely used AV engines of VirusTotal could not recognize the sample which broke new ground during the Linux domain. The malware chiefly concentrated on hijacking computers using Web servers as also encrypted critical folders utilized during Web-hosting as well as within Web-development ambience.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Twitter Community Helps Create Improved Linux Encoder Ransomware

    November 2015 saw the emergence of Linux.Encoder.1, the first piece of ransomware to target vulnerable Linux web servers. A programming flaw allowed Bitdefender researchers to obtain the decryption key and provide victims with a free recovery utility.

  • Plain cruelty: Boffins flay Linux ransomware for the third time

    Probably the world's most tragically determined blackhat developers have had their revitalised Linux.Encoder ransomware pwned again by meddling BitDefender whitehats.

    The third iteration of the Linux.Encoder ransomware was unleashed on the world, infecting a paltry 600 servers before a crack team of security analysts returned to rip it apart.

  • Windows and Linux Malware Linked to Chinese DDoS Tool

    Similar-looking malware targeting both Linux and Windows computers has been linked to a DDoSing toolkit sold by Chinese hackers via the ddos[.]tf service, Malware Must Die! reports.

    The malware, codenamed Linux/DDOSTF (or Linux/MrBlack) targets mainly Linux machines running Elasticsearch servers, but it also attacks and infects Windows systems, particularly older Windows XP and Windows 2003 Server instances.

  • Exploiting Silent Circle's Secure Blackphone

    The highly secure device could have been exploited, were it not for the responsible disclosure by a security researcher.

    Any modern device is made up of multiple hardware and software components, any one of which could represent a potential risk. That's a reality that secure mobile phone vendor Silent Circle has learned with its Blackphone, thanks to the responsible security disclosure from Tim Strazzere, director of mobile research at SentinelOne.

  • Severe Silent Circle Blackphone vulnerability lets hackers take over

    Researchers have revealed a severe vulnerability in Silent Circle's Blackphone which could allow attackers to take control of the device's functions.

    Silent Circle's Blackphone, born after former US National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden exposed the intelligence agency's spying practices on the global stage, is a phone peddled to the privacy-conscious. The Blackphone grants users complete control of app permissions and includes encrypted services such as Silent Phone and Silent Text, designed to prevent surveillance and eavesdropping.

    The device runs on PrivatOS, a custom Android build with a set of security-focused tools.

  • Security Notification and Linode Manager Password Reset

    The entire Linode team has been working around the clock to address both this issue and the ongoing DDoS attacks. We've retained a well-known third-party security firm to aid in our investigation. Multiple Federal law enforcement authorities are also investigating and have cases open for both issues. When the thorough investigation is complete, we will share an update on the findings.

  • How Hackers Invaded 30 Million Web Servers On The Internet With A Poem

    From an IP address associated with 32nd Chaos Communication Congress (32c3) taking place in Germany, some unknown hackers sent a poetic message to all the IPv4 addresses on the Internet who left with their web servers port open. Later, the hackers said that they didn’t mean to harm anybody and wished to remind the people the importance of keeping the Internet open and decentralised.

WordPress 4.4.1 Updates for XSS (and 52 other issues)

Filed under
OSS
Security
Web

The first WordPress update of 2016 is out and like many other incremental updates, it is being triggered by a security vulnerability. The single security issue being patched in WordPress 4.4.1 is a cross site scripting vulnerability that could have potentially enabled a site compromised.wordpress

From a general usability and bug perspective there are 52 bugs that WordPress developers are addressing in the 4.4.1 update that spans multiple area of the popular open-source content management system including.

Read more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Third try is no charm for failed Linux ransomware creators

    Getting cryptographic implementations right is difficult. A group of malware creators is currently experiencing that hard truth, to the amusement of security researchers.

    For the past several months, a group of cybercriminals have been infecting Linux systems -- primarily Web servers -- with a file-encrypting ransomware program that the security industry has dubbed Linux.Encoder.

  • Indian Hackers Attack Pakistani Websites In Response To Pathankot Terror Attack

    An Indian hacking collective named Indian Black Hats has defaced multiple Pakistani websites. This Kerala-based group has dedicated the attack to the little daughter of a Pathankot terror attack martyr. The group told fossBytes, “Harming is not our aim..but if anyone pick their eyes on our mother India..we stand for it”.

OpenSSL’s teachable moment: Secure Shell key management in light of open source vulnerabilities

Filed under
OSS
Security

Imagine an Internet without encryption. Credit card numbers would flow in the clear from point to point. Social Security numbers and other personally identifiable information would be sitting ducks for any cyber criminal to make off with. And government secrets wouldn’t stay secret for long.

Read more

Canonical Patches New Vulnerability for Ubuntu 15.10's Desktop and Raspberry Pi 2 Kernels

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

Just a few minutes ago, January 5, 2016, Canonical published several Ubuntu Security Notices to inform Ubuntu users about the availability of new Linux kernel versions for their operating systems.

Read more

Also: Xenial Xerus Alpha 1 released!

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Programming

Security News

  • Security advisories for Thursday
  • Please save GMane!
  • The End of Gmane?
    In 2002, I grew annoyed with not finding the obscure technical information I was looking for, so I started Gmane, the mailing list archive. All technical discussion took place on mailing lists those days, and archiving those were, at best, spotty and with horrible web interfaces. The past few weeks, the Gmane machines (and more importantly, the company I work for, who are graciously hosting the servers) have been the target of a number of distributed denial of service attacks. Our upstream have been good about helping us filter out the DDoS traffic, but it’s meant serious downtime where we’ve been completely off the Internet.
  • Pwnie Express makes IoT, Android security arsenal open source
    Pwnie Express has given the keys to software used to secure the Internet of Things (IoT) and Android software to the open-source community. The Internet of Things (IoT), the emergence of devices ranging from lighting to fridges and embedded systems which are connected to the web, has paved an avenue for cyberattackers to exploit.
  • The Software Supply Chain Is Bedeviled by Bad Open-Source Code [Ed: again, trace this back to FUD firms like Sonatype in this case]
    Open-source components play a key role in the software supply chain. By reducing the amount of code that development organizations need to write, open source enables companies to deliver software more efficiently — but not without significant risks, including defective and outdated components and security vulnerabilities.
  • Securing a Virtual World [Ed: paywall, undated (no year but reposted)]
  • Google tells Android's Linux kernel to toughen up and fight off those horrible hacker bullies
    In a blog post, Jeff Vander Stoep of the mobile operating system's security team said that in the next build of the OS, named Nougat, Google is going to be addressing two key areas of the Linux kernel that reside at the heart of most of the world's smartphones: memory protection and reducing areas available for attack by hackers.

today's howtos

Chew on this: Ubuntu Core Linux comes to the uCRobotics Bubblegum-96 board

Linux and other open source software have been in the news quite a bit lately. As more and more people are seeing, closed source is not the only way to make money. A company like Red Hat, for instance, is able to be profitable while focusing its business on open source. Ubuntu is one of the most popular Linux-based operating systems, and it is not hard to see why. Not only is it easy to use and adaptable to much hardware (such as SoC boards), but there is a ton of free support online from the Ubuntu user community too. Today, Canonical announces a special Ubuntu Core image for the uCRobotics Bubblegum-96 board. Read more