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Security

Google's Nexus devices get stealth Android update

Filed under
Android
Security

Google has quietly begun rolling out a new version of Android to its flagship Nexus devices, but so far it has remained shtum on just what has changed.

Support pages from US wireless player T-Mobile reveal that the Nexus 4 and Nexus 5 handsets and the 2013 version of the Nexus 7 tablet all began receiving over-the-air updates to Android 4.4.3 on Monday.

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Announcing Rapid Progress on Core Infrastructure Initiative

Filed under
OSS
Security

A month ago we announced the Core Infrastructure Initiative, a project to help fund critical open source projects that we all rely upon but that are in need of support. We moved quickly to organize the initiative and the industry reaction was swift and enthusiastic. I am proud to report on significant progress that I believe matches the quality of the reaction to the formation of the project.

First order of business was electing the Advisory Board, which will help the Steering Group (made up of funders and The Linux Foundation) determine which projects to fund. We are fortunate to have assembled many of the brightest minds in open source, web technology and computer security. I am thrilled to work with these individuals.

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Tails 1.1 Beta 1 Secure Distro Now Has Windows 8 Comouflage Mode

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security
Debian

Tails is a distribution based on Debian and Tor technologies that aims to keep its users as anonymous as possible. It gained a lot more visibility after Edward Snowden said that he used exactly this Linux distribution to hide his tracks. The developers are now implementing more changes and fixes that should ensure it becomes even more secure.

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TrueCrypt Not Dead, Forked and Relocated to Switzerland

Filed under
Security

The development of TrueCrypt, an open source piece of software used for on-the-fly encryption, has been terminated and users have been advised not to use it because it is not secure enough. Now, it seems that another team of developers have forked the software and rebased it in Switzerland.

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Kali Linux 1.0.7 review

Filed under
Reviews
Security

The latest update to Kali Linux was released a few days ago. Kali Linux 1.0.7 review is a summary review of the main features of this latest upgrade to the security distribution from Offensive Security, a security and penetration training outfit based somewhere on this third rock from the Sun.

The main feature introduced in Kali Linux 1.0.7 is the ability to transfer the system to a USB stick with encrypted persistence.

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The Linux Foundation’s Core Infrastructure Initiative Announces New Backers, First Projects to Receive Support and Advisory Board Members

Filed under
Linux
Security

The Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII), a project hosted by The Linux Foundation that enables technology companies, industry stakeholders and esteemed developers to collaboratively identify and fund open source projects that are in need of assistance, today announced five new backers, the first projects to receive funding from the Initiative and the Advisory Board members who will help identify critical infrastructure projects most in need of support.

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Hands-on with Kali Linux 1.0.7

Filed under
Linux
Security

One last thing about booting Kali Linux. The details of this are beyond the scope of this kind of general Linux blog, but one of the major advances in this release is support for Encrypted USB Persistence. This is specifically for people who will be booting Kali from a USB stick, it gives them the possibility to securely save changes to an encrypted partition on the USB drive. I haven't had time to look at this in detail yet, much less actually try it out, but at first glance I think it probably removes one of the major reasons for carrying a dedicated laptop around for security analysis, rather than just a Live USB stick.

So there you have it, short and very sweet. If you are interested in network security, forensic analysis or penetration testing, this is a Linux distribution you need to know about. If you're already using it, just make sure that you pick up the latest updates so that you get the new kernel and tools.

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BackTrack Successor Kali Linux 1.0.7 Arrives with Linux Kernel 3.14

Filed under
Linux
Security

As usually, Kali Linux 1.0.7 features various new tools, updated applications, as well as numerous fixes in order to make Kali Linux a more stable and reliable Linux operating system. This includes a new version of the Linux kernel, among other things.

There are numerous Linux distributions in the open source ecosystem, but there are very few built specifically for penetration testing and digital forensics. The former iteration of this distro, BackTrack, is one of the most downloaded OSes and it's the go-to operating system when you need a professional solution.

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Meet the Man Hired to Make Sure the Snowden Docs Aren't Hacked

Filed under
Linux
Security

When he got to Rio, Lee spent one entire day strengthening Greenwald’s computer, which at that point used Windows 8. Lee was worried spy agencies could break in, so he replaced the operating system with Linux, installed a firewall, disk encryption and miscellaneous software to make it more secure.

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Notable Penetration Test Linux distributions of 2014

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

A penetration test, or the short form pentest, is an attack on a computer system with the intention of finding security weaknesses, potentially gaining access to it, its functionality and data. A Penetration Testing Linux is a special built Linux distro that can be used for analyzing and evaluating security measures of a target system.

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More in Tux Machines

Parsix GNU/Linux 8.0 Test 3 Out Now with GNOME 3.16.3 and Linux Kernel 4.1.6 LTS

The Parsix GNU/Linux Project has just announced the release and immediate availability for download and testing of the third development milestone towards the Parsix GNU/Linux 8.0 (Mumble) operating system. Read more

$15 Orange Pi PC hacker SBC packs 1.6GHz quad-core SoC

Shenzhen Xunlong tipped a $15 “Orange Pi PC” SBC with a 1.6GHz quad-core Cortex-A7 SoC, Pi-compatible expansion, HDMI, 100Mbit Ethernet, quad USB, and more. Late last year and early this year, Shenzhen Xunlong Software introduced a family of open-spec, Linux- and Android-ready “Orange Pi” single board computers. The first two, the $49 Orange Pi and $40 Orange Pi Mini, were built with the Allwinner A20 SoC, featuring a dual-core, 1GHz Cortex-A7 CPU and PowerVR SGX544MP2 GPU. They were soon followed by the $59 Orange Pi Plus, based on a new, low cost quad-core, 1.6GHz Cortex-A7 Allwinner H3 SoC, featuring a Mali-400 MP2 GPU. Read more

Mozilla and Add-ons

  • Firefox 40.0.3 Brings Bug-Fixes Only
  • Reactions to Mozilla’s announcement about upcoming Firefox add-on changes
  • Mixed Feelings Greet Mozilla's Add-ons Overhaul
    Also new is a requirement for add-ons to be reviewed and signed by Mozilla before their deployment. Back in April, Mozilla's security lead Daniel Veditz published The Case for Extension Signing, addressing the volume of feedback their announcement had generated from the developer community. Veditz said the internet browsing experience for tens of thousands of people was being shaped by "third party add-ons in ways they did not choose and that benefit third parties, not the user."
  • Please, God, Don't Let Mozilla Ruin Firefox
    A week ago, Mozilla shed some light on its future, laying out a plan on how the browser is going to dramatically change in the upcoming months. While most of us understood "Chrome extensions were coming to Firefox," it is not as simple as we all thought.
  • The future of Firefox Add-ons - Nope
    Once in a while, I must give my sermons, to help you figure out how things work. Why this is not going to be good for us, the users, and why we must duly prepare, in advance. As it happens, Mozilla does not fully understand the market. It truly does not. When you make decisions based on incorrect data, you are bound to make a disastrous choice. Let's try to amend this, if possible.

Leftovers: Ubuntu