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Security

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Teardrop Attack: What Is It And How Does It Work?

    In Teardrop Attack, fragmented packets that are sent in the to the target machine, are buggy in nature and the victim’s machine is unable to reassemble those packets due to the bug in the TCP/IP fragmentation.

  • Updating code can mean fewer security headaches

    Organizations with high rates of code deployments spend half as much time fixing security issues as organizations without such frequent code updates, according to a newly released study.

    In its latest annual state-of-the-developer report, Devops software provider Puppet found that by better integrating security objectives into daily work, teams in "high-performing organizations" build more secure systems. The report, which surveyed 4,600 technical professionals worldwide, defines high IT performers as offering on-demand, multiple code deploys per day, with lead times for changes of less than one hour. Puppet has been publishing its annual report for five years.

  • Over half of world's top domains weak against email spoofing

    Over half of the world's most popular online services have misconfigured servers which could place users at risk from spoof emails, researchers have warned.

    According to Swedish cybersecurity firm Detectify, poor authentication processes and configuration settings in servers belonging to hundreds of major online domains are could put users at risk of legitimate-looking phishing campaigns and fraudulent emails.

Linux Kernel 4.6.3 Has Multiple Networking Improvements, Better SPARC Support

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Linux
Security

Today, June 24, 2016, renowned Linux kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman has announced the general availability of the third maintenance release for the Linux 4.6 kernel series.

Linux kernel 4.6.3 is here two weeks after the release of the second maintenance update in the series, Linux kernel 4.6.2, to change a total of 88 files, with 1302 insertions and 967 deletions. Unfortunately, very few GNU/Linux distributions have adopted the Linux 4.6 series, despite the fact that Greg Kroah-Hartman urged everyone to move to this most advanced kernel branch as soon as possible from Linux 4.5, which reached end of life.

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Google Hacker Donates His $15,000 Bug Bounty Cash Award To Charity

    Google’s leading security engineer Tavis Ormandy recently won a bug bounty challenge run by security solutions firm Bromium and decided to donate the money to charity. Following his gesture, Bromium matched Ormandy’s donation and donated $15,000 to Amnesty International organization.

  • Mozilla Awards $385,000 to Open Source Projects as part of MOSS “Mission Partners” Program

    For many years people with visual impairments and the legally blind have paid a steep price to access the Web on Windows-based computers. The market-leading software for screen readers costs well over $1,000. The high price is a considerable obstacle to keeping the Web open and accessible to all. The NVDA Project has developed an open source screen reader that is free to download and to use, and which works well with Firefox. NVDA aligns with one of the Mozilla Manifesto’s principles: “The Internet is a global public resource that must remain open and accessible.”

  • TOR Project And Security Experts Making A “Hardened” Version Of TOR To Defeat FBI

    The TOR Project is working closely with security researchers to implement a new technique to secure the TOR Browser against the FBI’s de-anonymization exploits. Called “Selfrando”, this technique will fight the FBI’s “Code Reuse” exploits and create a “hardened” version of TOR.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • New RAA ransomware written in JavaScript discovered

    A new variety of ransomware called RAA has been discovered that has the somewhat unusual attribution of being coded in JavaScript instead of one of the more standard programming languages making it more effective in certain situations.

  • Want To Be A Cool Security Guru?

    Well it will take some work, security is not like what they show on TV. You don’t need green on black text, special goggles or an unlimited enhance function. Instead, it requires sitting down and understanding the history of the field, what it means to be “secure” and what limitations or assumptions you can work under. This summer I have decided to start my journey on the vast field of cryptography and am doing an online course at Stanford University that provides an introduction to cryptography. It is appropriately named “Cryptography I” and is the first part of a two part course, the second part being offered later in the Fall. Both are taught by a really awesome professor Dan Boneh who I find explains the material very well. I decided I would like to make some posts about what I have learned in this course as I go through the material so that I can share my knowledge and get a chance to write it down somewhere for later reference.

  • WordPress 4.5.3 Maintenance and Security Release

    WordPress 4.5.3 is now available. This is a security release for all previous versions and we strongly encourage you to update your sites immediately.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security advisories for Monday
  • BadTunnel: Critical vulnerability affects every version of Microsoft's OS since Windows 95

    A security researcher from Tencent, China's largest internet service portal, has discovered a critical security flaw in Microsoft's Windows operating system that affects every single version of Windows over the last two decades, from Windows 95 all the way to Windows 10.

  • Decentralized Security

    If you're a fan of the cryptocurrency projects, you've heard of something called Ethereum. It's similar to bitcoin, but is a seperate coin. It's been in the news lately due to an attack on the currency. Nobody is sure how this story will end at this point, there are a few possible options, none are good. This got me thinking about the future of security, there are some parallels when you compare traditional currency to crypto currency as well as where we see security heading (stick with me here).

    The current way currency works is there is some central organization that is responsible for minting and controlling the currency, usually a country. There are banks, exchanges, loans, interest, physical money, and countless other ways the currency interacts with society. We will compare this to how IT security has mostly worked in the past. You had one large organization responsible for everything. If something went wrong, you could rely on the owner to take control and make things better. There are some instances where this isn't true, but in general it holds.

    Now if we look at cryptocurrency, there isn't really a single group or person in charge. That's the whole point though. The idea is to have nobody in charge so the currency can be used with some level of anonymity. You don't have to rely on some sort of central organization to give the currency legitimacy, the system itself has legitimacy built in.

Parrot Security OS 3.0 Ethical Hacking Distro Is Out, Now Ready for Raspberry Pi

Filed under
OS
Security

Parrot Security OS developer Frozenbox Network was extremely proud to announce the release of the final Parrot Security OS 3.0 "Lithium" computer operating system.

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Making a Case for Security Analytics

    Being a victim of a data breach no longer results in a slap on the wrist. Instead it can lead to costly fines, job loss, physical damage and an organization's massive loss of reputation. Case in point: Target. Following its high-profile breach in late 2013, Target suffered large losses in market valuation and paid more than $100 million in damages.

  • GoToMyPC password hack – urgent, change passwords NOW

    If you use the popular Citrix GoToMyPC remote access product for macOS, Windows, Kindle, iOS, and Android you will need to change all passwords now.

  • Web Application Defender's Field Report: Account Takeover Campaigns Spotlight

    ATO attacks (also known as credential stuffing) use previously breached username and password pairs to automate login attempts. This data may have been previously released on public dumpsites such as Pastebin or directly obtained by attackers through web application attacks such as SQLi. The goal of the attacks is to identify valid login credential data that can then be sold to gain fraudulent access to user accounts. ATO may be considered a subset of brute force attacks, however it is an increasing threat because it is harder to identify such attacks through traditional individual account authentication errors. The Akamai Threat Research Team analyzed web login transactions for one week across our customer base to identify ATO attack campaigns.

  • Google's security princess talks cybersecurity

    Her talk was even-keeled, informative, and included strong FOSS messaging about everyone's vested interest in internet security and privacy. After the talk was done, I watched her take audience questions (long enough for me to take a short conference call) where she patiently and handily fielded all manner of queries from up and down the stack.

BusyBotNet is a Fork of Busybox with Security Tools

Filed under
OSS
Security

Busybox provides a lightweight version of common command line utilities normally found on “big” Linux into a single binary, in order to bring them to embedded systems with limited memory and storage. As more and more embedded systems are now connected to the Internet, or as they are called nowadays the Internet of Things nodes, adding security tools, such as cryptographic utilities, could prove useful for administrators of such system, and so BusyBotNet project wsa born out of a fork of Busybox.

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Intel x86s hide another CPU that can take over your machine (you can't audit it)

    Recent Intel x86 processors implement a secret, powerful control mechanism that runs on a separate chip that no one is allowed to audit or examine. When these are eventually compromised, they'll expose all affected systems to nearly unkillable, undetectable rootkit attacks. I've made it my mission to open up this system and make free, open replacements, before it's too late.

  • Let’s Encrypt Accidentally Spills 7,600 User Emails

    Certificate authority Let’s Encrypt accidentally disclosed the email addresses of several thousand of its users this weekend.

    Josh Aas, Executive Director for the Internet Security Research Group (ISRG), the nonprofit group that helped launch the CA, apologized for the error on Saturday. In what Let’s Encrypt dubbed a preliminary report posted shortly after it happened, Aas blamed the faux pas on a bug in the automated email system the group uses.

  • phpMyAdmin Project Successfully Completes Security Audit

    Software Freedom Conservancy congratulates its phpMyAdmin project on succesfuly completing completing a thorough security audit, as part of Mozilla's Secure Open Source Fund. No serious issues were found in the phyMyAdmin codebase.

  • StartCom launches a new service - StartEncrypt

    StartCom, a leading global Certificate Authority (CA) and provider of trusted identity and authentication services, announces a new service – StartEncrypt today, an automatic SSL certificate issuance and installation software for your web server.

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GTK Graphics

  • GTK Lands A Big Refactoring Of OpenGL Code
    In addition to Red Hat's Benjamin Otte working on a Vulkan renderer for GTK4's GSK, he's also been working on a big refactoring of the OpenGL code that's now been merged to master. OpenGL is very important for GTK4 as it will play a big role in rendering with GSK. With this "large GL refactoring", a big clean-up was done of the OpenGL GDK code, affecting the X11, Win32, Wayland, and Mir code too. Some of the specific work includes no longer using buffer-age information, passing the actual OpenGL context, and simplifying the code. More details via this Git commit.
  • A Vulkan Renderer For GNOME's GTK+ GSK Is In Development
    A Vulkan back-end is in development for GNOME's GTK's tool-kit new GTK Scene Kit (GSK) code. Benjamin Otte has begun experimenting with a Vulkan back-end for GTK's GSK code with GTK Scene Kit being one of the big additions in development for the major GTK+ 4.0 milestone. GSK implements a scene graph to allow for more complex graphical control of widgets and other improvements to its graphics pipeline. GSK was merged back in October and currently uses OpenGL for rendering while there is now a branched Vulkan renderer.

Linux and Graphics