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Security

A word (or two) about Linux desktop security

Filed under
Linux
Security

cristalinux.blogspot: When I wrote my Windows 7 vs. Ubuntu 10.04 Beta ARTICLE several days ago, I rated Ubuntu higher than Windows in terms of security. In hindsight, I think I was perhaps assuming certain bits and pieces, as well as maybe not thoroughly explaining why I thought that was the case.

OS of the Future: Built for Security

Filed under
OS
Software
Security

eweek.com: Led, somewhat ironically, by Microsoft Windows, operating system vendors and some other software vendors have been making their products more secure by default. They also have been providing tools and best-practice guidelines for application developers to improve security.

Becoming a "Linux Security Artist"

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Security

linux.com: After forty years in the commercial computing business, the one idea that has been drilled into me by security professionals is the fact that there is no such thing as a secure computer system, only levels of insecurity.

Setting the record straight on sudo

Filed under
Software
Security

blogs.techrepublic.com: I recently read a blog posting that denounced the use of sudo as insecure. My first reaction was that the author had no idea how to use sudo properly or why you would want to.

System security? What about your DATA!

Filed under
Linux
Security

fewt.com: It is often said that Linux is more secure than Windows, and for enterprise workloads this tends to be very true. Desktop Linux is a completely different use case, and unfortunately security configuration is sadly way behind (read: non-existent).

Linux isn't invulnerable. Don't say it is.

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Linux
Security

thepcspy.com: Every month or so, I find some blog or forum post telling the world that because Linux is so hardcore, there's very little chance of it getting any malware. As you can probably tell from the title, I disagree and want these people to recognise why their arrogance is dangerous.

Do I need an anti-virus in Linux?

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Linux
Security

dedoimedo.com: And the simple answer is: no, you do not need an anti-virus in Linux. Yes, let me tell you a little secret. Come closer. That's it. You don't need an anti-virus in Windows, either! Boom! There you go.

Got Security? You're in Denial

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Security
  • Got Security? You're in Denial
  • Collection of security checks for Linux
  • Worst. Security Product. EVER!
  • Multi-user Security in Linux

Apache bug prompts update advice

Filed under
Software
Security
Web

zdnet.com.au: IT security company Sense of Security has discovered a serious bug in Apache's HTTP web server, which could allow a remote attacker to gain complete control of a database.

Be Afraid if Someone's Got a Voltmeter Hooked to Your CPU

Filed under
OSS
Security

ebb.org/bkuhn/blog: I had a hunch what was going on. I quickly downloaded a copy of the academic paper that was cited as the sole source for the story and read it. As I feared, OpenSSL was getting some bad press unfairly.

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