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Security

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Locky Ransomware Spreading in Massive Spam Attack

    Trustwave said over the last seven days, malware-laced spam has represented 18 percent of total spam collected in its honeypots. Trustwave said malware-infected spam typically represent less than 2 percent of total spam. The recent increase to 18 percent is almost entirely traced to ransomware JavaScript downloaders. Campaigns aren’t continuous, Trustwave reported, but are delivered in hour-long bursts.

  • Considering Docker? Consider Security First

    Containers started making a big splash in IT and dev operations starting in 2014. The benefits of flexibility and go-live times, among many others, are almost undeniable. But large enterprises considering using a container platform for development or IT operations should pause and consider security first.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Big-name sites hit by rash of malicious ads spreading crypto ransomware [Updated]

    Mainstream websites, including those published by The New York Times, the BBC, MSN, and AOL, are falling victim to a new rash of malicious ads that attempt to surreptitiously install crypto ransomware and other malware on the computers of unsuspecting visitors, security firms warned.

    The tainted ads may have exposed tens of thousands of people over the past 24 hours alone, according to a blog post published Monday by Trend Micro. The new campaign started last week when "Angler," a toolkit that sells exploits for Adobe Flash, Microsoft Silverlight, and other widely used Internet software, started pushing laced banner ads through a compromised ad network.

    According to a separate blog post from Trustwave's SpiderLabs group, one JSON-based file being served in the ads has more than 12,000 lines of heavily obfuscated code. When researchers deciphered the code, they discovered it enumerated a long list of security products and tools it avoided in an attempt to remain undetected.

  • VMware fixes XSS flaws in vRealize for Linux

    VMware patched two cross-site scripting issues in several editions of its vRealize cloud software. These flaws could be exploited in stored XSS attacks and could result in the user's workstation being compromised.

  • VMware patches severe XSS flaws in vRealize software

    VMware has patched two serious vulnerabilities in the firm's vRealize software which could lead to remote code execution and the compromise of business workstations.

    In a security advisory posted on Tuesday, the Palo Alto, California-based firm said the "important" vulnerabilities are found within the VMware vRealize Automation and VMware vRealize Business Advanced and Enterprise software platforms.

  • Get ready to patch Git servers, clients – nasty-looking bugs surface

    A chap who found two serious security bugs in Git servers and clients has urged people to patch their software.

    The flaws are present in Git including the 2.x, 1.9 and 1.7 branches, meaning the vulnerabilities have been lurking in the open-source version control tool for years.

    It is possible these two programming blunders can be potentially exploited to corrupt memory or execute malicious code on remote servers and clients. To do so, an attacker would have to craft a Git repository with a tree of files that have extremely long filenames, and then push the repo to a vulnerable server or let a vulnerable client clone it from the internet.

Ubuntu 15.10 for Raspberry Pi 2 Kernel Patched by Canonical to Fix Seven Issues

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Security

On March 15, 2016, we reported on the fact that Canonical published several new Ubuntu Security Notices to inform the community about important kernel updates for the Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, and Ubuntu 15.10 operating systems.

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Thunderbird’s defective method of enabling anti-virus software to scan incoming POP3 e-mail messages

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Security

Thunderbird’s method of enabling anti-virus software to scan incoming e-mail messages is explained in the mozillaZine article 'Download each e-mail to a separate file before adding to Inbox' and in Mozilla bug report no. 116443 (the bug report that resulted in the functionality being implemented).

Chromebook/Google/Gentoo Security

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Gentoo
Google
Security
  • Google has doubled its bounty for a Chromebook hack to $100,000

    Google doubled the bounty it will pay for a successful exploit of its Chromebook laptop to $100,000, sweetening the pot in hopes of drawing more attention from security researchers.

    The larger reward is intended for someone who finds a persistent compromise of a Chromebook in guest mode, according to Google's security blog on Monday.

  • Google's Bug Bounty for a Chromebook Hack Rises to $100,000

    We've reported a few times on bug bounties--cash prizes offered by open source communities to anyone who finds key software bugs--ranging from bounties offered by Google (for the Chrome browser) and Mozilla. This open method of discovering security vulnerabilities has been embraced at Google, especially. In fact, Google has offered up as much as $1 million to people who identify key vulnerabilities in the Chrome browser.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Monday's security advisories
  • Building a Jenkins Security Realm

    Last week I spent a good while on writing a new security realm for KDE's Jenkins setups. The result of my tireless java brewing is that the Jenkins installation of KDE neon now uses KDE's Phabricator setup to authenticate users and manage permissions via OAuth.

  • The Great Linux Mint Heist: the Aftermath

    In a shocking move, cyber criminals recently hacked the Linux Mint Web server and used it to launch an attack against the popular distro's user base.

  • These Are the Best System Rescue Tools After a Malware Attack

    System rescue tools provided by antivirus makers are often used to clean infected systems after the main antivirus software detects infections.

    Most antivirus makers bundle this functionality in their main products, but a few offer more specialized tools that also repair damaged files, attempting to restore the system to its earlier working point as much as possible.

    Only five of such tools are currently available on the market as free tools. They are AVG Rescue CD, Avira EU-Clean, Bitdefender Rescue CD, ESET SysRescue, and Kaspersky Virus Removal Tool.

  • Documents with malicious macros deliver fileless malware to financial-transaction systems

    Spammed Word documents with malicious macros have become a popular method of infecting computers over the past few months. Attackers are now taking it one step further by using such documents to deliver fileless malware that gets loaded directly in the computer's memory.

    Security researchers from Palo Alto Networks analyzed a recent attack campaign that pushed spam emails with malicious Word documents to business email addresses from the U.S., Canada and Europe.

Canonical Releases Major Kernel Update for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, Patches 13 Issues

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Security
Ubuntu

We reported on March 14 that Canonical published two new Ubuntu Security Notices with detailed information on multiple Linux kernel vulnerabilities patched for Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) and Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) operating systems.

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Canonical Patches Seven Linux Kernel Vulnerabilities in Ubuntu 15.10, Update Now

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Security
Ubuntu

We reported earlier that Canonical released a minor kernel update for its Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) operating system, and now the company announces a new kernel update for Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf).

Read more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Hackers turn to angr for automated exploit discovery and patching

    A team of researchers are battling to trouser the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's US$2m prize to build a system that aims to best human offensive and defensive security personnel at exploitation discovery and patching.

    The Shellphish team, with hackers in the US, France, China, Brazil, and Senegal, is big in the capture-the-flag circuit and won the DEF CON competition in 2006.

    And so it jumped when DARPA in 2014 pinned the word "cyber" to the title of its then decade-old Grand Challenge competition and the quest to automate vulnerability discovery and remediation.

  • How to foil a bank heist

    Essentially, Windows security updates ensure that some zero-day vulnerabilities are fixed as the Microsoft programming team become aware of them and are able to fix them. As a result of Microsoft security updates for Windows XP being discontinued, there is no way for anyone running Windows XP to secure their computer.1

  • Containers are like sandwiches

    There are loads of containers available out there you can download that aren't trusted sources. Don't download random containers from random places. It's no different than trying to buy a sandwich from a filthy shop that has to shoo the rats out of the kitchen with a broom.

  • Do you trust this package?

    But what guarantee is there that no MITM attacker compromised the tarballs when they were downloaded from upstream by a distro package maintainer? If you think distro package maintainers bother with silly things like GPG signature checking when downloading tarballs, then I regret to inform you that Santa is not real, and your old pet is not on vacation, it is dead.

  • Your next car will be hacked. Will autonomous vehicles be worth it?

    Self-driving cars could cut road deaths by 80%, but without better security they put us at risk of car hacking and even ransom demands, experts at SXSW say

  • Microsoft: We Store Disk Encryption Keys, But We’ve Never Given Them to Cops [Ed: just to spies. The following page includes several clear examples where Microsoft is caught giving crypto keys to spies. Microsoft is answering/addressing concerns not as they were raised. This is a non-denying denial.]

    Microsoft says it has never helped police investigators unlock its customers’ encrypted computers—despite the fact that the company often holds they key to get their data.

    If you store important stuff on your computer, it’s great to have the option to lock it up and encrypt your data so that no one can access it if you ever lose your laptop or it gets stolen. But what happens if, one day, you forget your own password to decrypt it? To give customers a way to get their data back in this situation, Microsoft has been automatically uploading a recovery key in the cloud for Windows computers since 2013.

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Torvalds at LinuxCon: The Highlights and the Lowlights

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