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Security

Is Linux More Secure than Windows?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Security

When it comes to control systems, a common question has long been: Is Linux inherently more secure than Windows? Being a fan of Linux/Unix systems, I desperately want to answer “yes” to this question. During the 1980s and 1990s, so much of the work I was involved in ran under Unix. These days I run Linux on my home computer, and once a year I boot up a Windows XP virtual machine running under Virtual Box, to run my tax software. In the office, I rant about the lousy Windows operating system (OS) and ask why the world doesn’t switch to Linux. And as much as I hate to admit it, as a system integrator I am mostly locked into dealing with Microsoft’s flavor of the month operating system because of customer standards and the tools available.

From the appearance of “Brain,” which is recognized as the first computer virus, in 1986, to Stuxnet to the Zotob worm (the virus that knocked 13 of DaimlerChrysler’s U.S. automobile manufacturing plants offline), one thing all these viruses have in common is that they were directed at Microsoft’s operating systems. However, according to Zone-H (an archive of defaced websites), in a statistics report for the period 2005-2007: “In the past the most attacked operating system was Windows, but many servers were migrated from Windows to Linux… Therefore the attacks migrated as well, as Linux is now the most attacked operating system with 1, 485,280 defacements against 815,119 in Windows systems (numbers calculated since 2000).”

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Free Linux Firewall OS IPFire 2.15 Core 81 Features Gets Multiple Fixes

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux
Security

Michael Tremer, a developer for the ipfire.org team, has announced that IPFire 2.13 Core 81, a new stable build of the popular Linux-based firewall distribution, bringing quite a few security fixes.

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Linux Security Threats on the Rise

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Every year, heck...every month, Linux is adopted by more companies and organizations as an important if not primary component of their enterprise platform. And the more serious the hardware platform, the more likely it is to be running Linux. 60% of servers, 70% of Web servers and 95% of all supercomputers are Linux-based!

Even if they're not "Linux shops", companies realize certain benefits from bringing Linux in for specific purposes. Its reliability, flexibility, scalability and cost of ownership offer huge advantages over other OSes...but I don't have to tell you that, do I? You probably earn your keep because of these statistics!

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Qubes 2 RC2 Is Probably the Most Secure Operating System in Existence – Gallery

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Qubes, an open source operating system designed to provide strong security for desktop computing, which is based on Xen, X Window System, and Linux and can run most Linux applications and utilize most of the Linux drivers, is now at version 2 RC2 and it's ready for testing.

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IPFire 2.15 Core 80 Is a Powerful and Free Linux Firewall OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Michael Tremer, a developer for the ipfire.org team, has announced that IPFire 2.13 Core 80, a new stable build of the popular Linux-based firewall distribution, has been released and is now available for download.

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Mozilla's Developer Network Site Has Leaks

Filed under
Moz/FF
Security

Mozilla's website dedicated to developers has suffered from a database error that has exposed email addresses and encrypted passwords of registered users for about a month, the company announced.
About 76,000 Mozilla Development Network (MDN) users had their email addresses exposed, along with around 4,000 encrypted passwords, said Stormy Peters, director of development relations, and Joe Stevensen, operations security manager. Many of those affected have already been notified.

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Answering questions regarding the Fedora Security Team

Filed under
Red Hat
Security

Wow, I had no idea that people would care about the start of this project. There seems to be a few questions out there that I’d like to address here to clarify what we are doing and why.

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Mitro Releases a New Free & Open Source Password Manager

Filed under
OSS
Security

Today, Twitter acquired a password manager startup called Mitro. As part of the deal, Mitro will be releasing the source to its client and server code under the GPL.

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DHS Wants To Help Developers Secure Open-Source Software

Filed under
OSS
Security

The Department of Homeland Security is funding a project aimed at protecting the nation's critical infrastructure and networks by providing tools that test for defects in open source and commercial software.

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Tor anonymity service says unknown attackers compromised its network

Filed under
Moz/FF
OSS
Security

The Tor encryption service is a high-profile bastion of computer security, but the project appears to have been compromised earlier this year. Today, the Tor Project blog announced that an unknown party likely managed to gather information about people who were looking up hidden services — websites that users can operate and visit anonymously, like Silk Road — and could theoretically have compromised other parts of the network.

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Android Leftovers

Benchmarking A 10-Core Tyan/IBM POWER Server For ~$300 USD

If you live in the EU and have been wanting to explore IBM POWER hardware on Linux, a load of Tyan Habanero servers recently became available through a German retailer for 269 EUR (~$306 USD) that comes equipped with a 10-core POWER8 processor. While not POWER9, it's still an interesting Linux-capable beast and the price is unbeatable if you have been wanting to add POWER hardware to your collection. Phoronix reader Lauri Kasanen recently bought one of these IBM POWER servers at the 269 EUR price point and has shared thoughts on this server as well as some benchmarks. Here is Lauri's guest post checking out this low-cost 2U IBM server. Recently a batch of refurbished POWER8 servers became available for very affordable prices. Always eager to play with power, especially for netbook-class prices, I grabbed one, and decided to run some benchmarks for everyone. For comparison data I used Michael's POWER9 benchmark from November, recent enough that software versions are close enough. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Google is winning in education, but Apple and Microsoft are battling for market share
    Apple used to have the most devices in U.S. schools, but Google soared to the top after the release of the Chromebook in 2011. In 2018, Chromebooks made up 60 percent of all laptops and tablets purchased for U.S. K-12 classrooms, up from just 5 percent in 2012. Microsoft is second at 22 percent, followed by Apple, with 18 percent of shipments to U.S. schools in 2018, according to data from Futuresource Consulting.
  • Design and Web team summary – 15 March 2019
    This was a fairly busy two weeks for the Web & design team at Canonical. [...] We maintain the Vanilla css framework that most of the websites at Ubuntu and Canonical use. Here are a few patterns and websites that were updated.
  • The New York Times has released an open-source tool to let you manage all your internal knowledge more easily

    Library is a wiki at heart, but it uses the familiar Google Docs as its backend and editing interface, easing maintenance for a wide population of users (“we wanted to meet people where they already were, rather than trying to teach them something entirely new”).

  • We Built a Collaborative Documentation Site. Deploy Your Own With the Push of a Button.

    Our solution to this problem has worked well for us. We hope others will find value in the technology we built, so we’re releasing Library to the open source community.

  • foss-north 2019: Community Day
    I don’t dare to count the days until foss-north 2019, but it is very soon. One of the changes to this year is that we expand the conference with an additional community day. The idea with the community day here is that we arrange for conference rooms all across town and invite open source projects to use them for workshops, install fests, hackathons, dev sprints or whatever else they see fit. It is basically a day of mini-conferences spread out across town. The community day is on April 7, the day before the conference days, and is free of charge.
  • FSFE Newsletter March 2019
    This month's newsletter highlights the new project the FSFE recently joined and the funding opportunities it offers, that you may want to take advantage of. You can get the latest updates on the Copyright Directive reform and the hottest news regarding Article 13, as well as a short summary of what else has happened during the past month. In the Editor's choice section this month you can find interesting news on developments with the Radio Equipment Directive, and find out who else have expressed their support for our "Public Money? Public Code!" campaign and what they have to say about it.