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Security

IoT and Linux

Filed under
Linux
Security
  • Linux’s Torvalds surprised by IoT uptake

    Linux founder Linus Torvalds is starting to appreciate the use of his operating system as a backbone for embedded systems, especially in the world of Internet of Things (IoT), speaking at the Embedded Linux Conference & OpenIoT Summit for the first time this week.

  • Linus Torvalds isn't worried about IoT security

    Devices like smart heaters, smart bulbs and smart refrigerators have direct access to unlimited power supply; they have direct access to the internet. And things can go really bad.

    And with IDC predicting that the worldwide IoT market will grow from $655.8 billion in 2014 to $1.7 trillion in 2020, security is becoming a very serious topic.

  • Samsung's SmartThings

    If you pick up a Samsung Smart TV this year, you'll be certain to find "Linux Inside" in many ways. Samsung continues to build on its Tizen-powered Smart TV UI, which this year it will enhance with integrated SmartThings IoT hub technology, enabling the TV as the control center for a smart home. Samsung's SUHD TVs for 2016 will enable users to connect with, control and monitor hundreds of other compatible devices including lights, locks, thermostats, cameras, speakers, appliances, sensors and the like.

Canonical Patches Six New Linux Kernel Vulnerabilities in Ubuntu 15.10 and 14.04

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

Today, April 6, Canonical has announced the availability of new kernel versions for its Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf), Ubuntu 15.10 for Raspberry Pi 2, and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating systems.

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Shodan2Sheets

    After spending last night working on a Reverse DNS Function for Google Sheets I couldnt leave well enough alone and wrote Shodan2Sheets tonight using the shodan.io api.

  • Security is a process, not a reaction

    If this sounds familiar, you are probably running a web application of some kind. Maybe your whole business depends on it. Maybe you didn't hear about the latest world-on-fire vulnerability. Panic.

    How do you keep up with security issues when everything is happening so fast? Which parts of your technical stack are the most at risk? Is the customer data safe? Do you really need to care?

  • Three-year-old IBM patch for critical Java flaw is broken

    Attackers can easily bypass the patch to exploit a vulnerability that allows them to escape from the Java security sandbox

  • FBI Says a Mysterious Hacking Group Has Had Access to US Govt Files for Years

    The feds warned that “a group of malicious cyber actors,” whom security experts believe to be the government-sponsored hacking group known as APT6, “have compromised and stolen sensitive information from various government and commercial networks” since at least 2011, according to an FBI alert obtained by Motherboard.

    The alert, which is also available online, shows that foreign government hackers are still successfully hacking and stealing data from US government’s servers, their activities going unnoticed for years. This comes months after the US government revealed that a group of hackers, widely believed to be working for the Chinese government, had for more than a year infiltrated the computer systems of the Office of Personnel Management, or OPM. In the process, they stole highly sensitive data about several millions of government workers and even spies.

  • Sources: Trump Hotels Breached Again

    Banking industry sources tell KrebsOnSecurity that the Trump Hotel Collection — a string of luxury properties tied to business magnate and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump — appears to be dealing with another breach of its credit card systems. If confirmed, this would be the second such breach at the Trump properties in less than a year.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Matriux Linux Operating System For Hackers — An Alternative To Kali Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Matriux is an open source Linux-based operating system that’s designed in accordance with the needs of security researchers and professionals. The OS comes with more than 300 hacking tools that include the likes of Wireshark, Aircrack-ng, Nmap, Vidalia, TrueCrypt and more. Matriux hacking OS features a traditional desktop environment that’s powered by GNOME Classic

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Linux Ransomware and why everyone could be affected [Ed: Bitdefender ad as ‘article’]
  • Kaiten targets Linux routers, gateways, access points and now IoT

    Change default passwords on network equipment even if it is not reachable from the Internet.

  • Security is really about Risk vs Reward

    Every now and then the conversation erupts about what is security really? There's the old saying that the only secure computer is one that's off (or fill in your favorite quote here, there are hundreds). But the thing is, security isn't the binary concept: you can be secure, or insecure. That's not how anything works. Everything is a sliding scale, you are never secure, you are never insecure. You're somewhere in the middle. Rather than bumble around about your risk though, you need to understand what's going on and plan for the risk.

Safety/Privacy in Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF
Security
  • Firefox and cookie micromanagement

    For most of its existence, Firefox has provided users with the ability to manage how cookies are stored with a rather high degree of granularity: users can block specific cookies, create site-wide exceptions to the accept/block policy, and configure behavior for third-party cookies. Up until Firefox 44, there was an additional option as well, one that allowed users to choose the expiration point (that is, expiring them at the end of the session or letting them persist) for every cookie they encounter. That option was removed in the Firefox 44 release, which has made some users rather unhappy.

    The option in question was found in the Privacy preferences screen, labeled "Ask me every time" on the "Keep until:" selector. When enabled, the option raised a dialog box asking the user to accept or reject each cookie encountered, with a "accept for this session only" choice provided. Removing the option was proposed in 2010, although the patch to perform the removal did not land until 2015. It was released in Firefox 44 in January 2016.

  • How Safe Browsing works in Firefox

    If you want to learn more about how Safe Browsing works in Firefox, you can find all of the technical details on the Safe Browsing and Application Reputation pages of the Mozilla wiki or you can ask questions on our mailing list.

  • Decentraleyes Addon Fixes Browser Privacy, Circumvents CDNs

    Widespread CDN acceptance has been a security flaw that sacrifices privacy simply because it breaks web pages on anything put a text-based browser, which is a sacrifice few are willing to make for the sake of their information remaining local.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Reviewing Important Healthcare Cybersecurity Frameworks [Ed: Microsoft Windows]

    Just recently, a ransomware attack affected Hollywood Presbyterian in California, causing the hospital to pay $17,000 to regain access to its databases.

  • U.S., Canada issue joint alert on 'ransomware' after hospital attacks [iophk: The governments need to track down those spreading Windows in the hospitals.]

    The United States and Canada on Thursday issued a rare joint cyber alert, warning against a recent surge in extortion attacks that infect computers with viruses known as "ransomware," which encrypt data and demand payments for it to be unlocked.

    The warning follows reports from several private security firms that they expect the crisis to worsen, because hackers are getting more sophisticated and few businesses have adopted proper security measures to thwart such attacks.

  • NIST Publishes New Security Standard For Encrypting Credit Card, Medical Info

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed new encryption methods for securing financial data and other sensitive information.

    The NIST publication SP 800-38G authored by Morris Dworkin specifies cryptography standards for both binary and non-binary data, preserving the look and feel of the unencrypted digits. Earlier encryption methods designed by NIST worked for binary data. But for strings of decimal numbers, there was no feasible technique to produce coded data that preserves the original format.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • A Quick Hands-On With Chatty, A Desktop Twitch Chat Client
    Chatty is a desktop Twitch Chat client for Windows, macOS and Linux written in Ja
  • HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 Adds Support for Linux Mint 18, Fedora 24
    The open-source HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) project has been updated on August 29, 2016, to version 3.16.8, a maintenance update that adds support for new printers and GNU/Linux operating systems. According to the release notes, HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 adds support for new all-in-one HP printers, including HP OfficeJet Pro 6970, HP OfficeJet Pro 6960, HP OfficeJet 250 Mobile, HP DeskJet 3700, as well as HP DeskJet Ink Advantage 3700. Also new in the HPLIP 3.16.8 update is support for the recently released Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" Cinnamon, MATE, Xfce, and the upcoming KDE editions, the Fedora 24 Linux operating system, as well as the Debian GNU/Linux 8.5 "Jessie" distribution. So if you're using any of these OSes, you can now update to the latest HPLIP release.
  • MPlayer-Based MPV 0.20.0 Video Player Released with New Options and Commands
    The popular, open-source, and cross-platform MPV video player software received a new update, version 0.20.0, which comes only two weeks after the previous 0.19.0 maintenance release. MPV 0.20.0 is not a major update, and, according to the release notes, it only implements a couple of new options and commands, such as "--video-unscaled=downscale-big" for changing the aspect ratio. Additionally, the MPlayer-based video playback application also gets the "--image-display-duration" option for controlling the duration of image display, and a new "dcomposition" flag for controlling DirectComposition.
  • FFmpeg 3.1.3 "Laplace" Open-Source Multimedia Framework Now Available for Linux
    The major FFmpeg 3.1 "Laplace" open-source and cross-platform multimedia framework has received recently its third maintenance update, version 3.1.3, which brings updated components. FFmpeg 3.1 was announced two months ago, at the end of June, and it introduced a multitude of new features to make the popular multimedia backend even more reliable and handy to game and application developers. Dubbed Laplace, FFmpeg 3.1 is currently the most advanced FFmpeg release, cut from Git master on June 26, 2016.
  • GNU Scientific Library 2.2 released
    Version 2.2 of the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) is now available. GSL provides a large collection of routines for numerical computing in C. This release contains new linear algebra routines (Pivoted and Modified Cholesky, Complete Orthogonal Decomposition, matrix condition number estimation) as well as a completely rewritten nonlinear least squares module, including support for Levenberg-Marquardt, dogleg, double-dogleg, and Steihaug-Toint methods. The full NEWS file entry is appended below.

today's howtos

Leftovers: OSS

  • Report: If DOD Doesn't Embrace Open Source, It'll 'Be Left Behind'
    Unless the Defense Department and its military components levy increased importance on software development, they risk losing military technical superiority, according to a new report from the Center for a New American Security. In the report, the Washington, D.C.-based bipartisan think tank argues the Pentagon, which for years has relied heavily on proprietary software systems, “must actively embrace open source software” and buck the status quo. Currently, DOD uses open source software “infrequently and on an ad hoc basis,” unlike tech companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook that wouldn’t exist without open source software.
  • The Honey Trap of Copy/Pasting Open Source Code
    I couldn’t agree more with Bill Sourour’s article ‘Copy.Paste.Code?’ which says that copying and pasting code snippets from sources like Google and StackOverflow is fine as long as you understand how they work. However, the same logic can’t be applied to open source code. When I started open source coding at the tender age of fourteen, I was none the wiser to the pitfalls of copy/pasting open source code. I took it for granted that if a particular snippet performed my desired function, I could just insert it into my code, revelling in the fact that I'd just gotten one step closer to getting my software up and running. Yet, since then, through much trial and error, I’ve learned a thing or two about how to use open source code effectively.
  • Affordable, Open Source, 3D Printable CNC Machine is Now on Kickstarter
    The appeals of Kickstarter campaigns are many. There are the rewards for backers, frequently taking the form of either deep discounts on the final product or unusual items that can’t be found anywhere else. Pledging to support any crowdfunding campaign is a gamble, but it’s an exciting gamble; just browsing Kickstarter is pretty exciting, in fact, especially in the technological categories. Inventive individuals and startups offer new twists on machines like 3D printers and CNC machines – often for much less cost than others on the market.
  • Open Standards and Open Source
    Much has changed in the telecommunications industry in the years since Standards Development Organization (SDOs) such as 3GPP, ITU and OMA were formed. In the early days of telecom and the Internet, as fundamental technology was being invented, it was imperative for the growth of the new markets that standards were established prior to large-scale deployment of technology and related services. The process for development of these standards followed a traditional "waterfall" approach, which helped to harmonize (sometimes competing) pre-standard technical solutions to market needs.

Leftovers: BSD

  • The Voicemail Scammers Never Got Past Our OpenBSD Greylisting
    We usually don't see much of the scammy spam and malware. But that one time we went looking for them, we found a campaign where our OpenBSD greylisting setup was 100% effective in stopping the miscreants' messages. During August 23rd to August 24th 2016, a spam campaign was executed with what appears to have been a ransomware payload. I had not noticed anything particularly unusual about the bsdly.net and friends setup that morning, but then Xavier Mertens' post at isc.sans.edu Voice Message Notifications Deliver Ransomware caught my attention in the tweetstream, and I decided to have a look.
  • Why FreeBSD Doesn't Aim For OpenMP Support Out-Of-The-Box