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Security

Tor, trust and the NSA

Filed under
OSS
Security

Tor is an anonymizing network that’s designed to protect you by “bouncing your communications around a distributed network of relays run by volunteers all around the world: it prevents somebody watching your Internet connection from learning what sites you visit, and it prevents the sites you visit from learning your physical location.”

That’s cool, but does Tor really guarantee you what you think or assume it does? I can’t say for sure, but when facing a state-sponsored entity with time and resources on its side, you cannot be too careful. At least if pays to know what other people think about Tor, especially when what they have to say runs counter to what you know, or what you think you know.

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Avoid the Android vampire apps

Filed under
Android
Security

Some Android applications will drain your smartphone or tablet of battery life, storage or bandwidth like a blood-sucking fiend. Here's what's what with the worst of the worst.

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Snowden on Dropbox: It’s hostile to privacy

Filed under
Software
Security

Dropbox is a very popular Cloud storage services, but is it good for the privacy-conscious?

According to Edward Snowden, it’s not.

In an interviewed published on GuardianNews, Snowden described Dropbox as “hostile to privacy.”

So what are the better alternatives. Snowden recommended Cloud storage services with zero-knowledge as a key feature.

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How to use public PCs safely with Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security
HowTos

Public PCs aren't safe, so what's a PC user to do? Carry a Linux distribution on a USB stick in their backpocket of course!

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Announcing Project Zero

Filed under
Google
OSS
Security

Security is a top priority for Google. We've invested a lot in making our products secure, including strong SSL encryption by default for Search, Gmail and Drive, as well as encrypting data moving between our data centers. Beyond securing our own products, interested Googlers also spend some of their time on research that makes the Internet safer, leading to the discovery of bugs like Heartbleed.

The success of that part-time research has led us to create a new, well-staffed team called Project Zero.

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LibreSSL Portable Encounters Its First Release

Filed under
OSS
Security

OpenBSD developers have announced their first release of LibreSSL portable.

LibreSSL 2.0.0 is the release and is tested to build on Linux, Solaris, Mac OS X, and FreeBSD systems. Bob Beck of OpenBSD explains, "This is intended as an initial release to allow the community to start using and providing feedback. We will be adding support for other platforms as time and resources permit."

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Samsung Nixes Knox: The Android Security Saga Continues

Filed under
Android
Security

Granted, Google has been updating handset issues at a quicker pace – particularly when it comes to security patches, via Play Services –and so far, the telcos have not played spoilers. But remember: Google has not initiated a move to push an entirely new OS directly to users except to those who own Google’s telco independent Nexus brand devices. Keep in mind that there’s a big difference between updating a feature or security patch and producing an entirely new OS. OS updates typically up the Kernel and the radios. It will be interesting (and historical) if the telcos continue to stay out of the way.

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[Fedora] Simple Patch Policy

Filed under
Red Hat
Security

Following the approval of the Simple Patch policy, all the necessary pieces are now in place.

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How Card.com Is Securing Itself and Its Users With Open Source

Filed under
OSS
Drupal
Security

"We're heavily involved in Drupal. I'm a member of the Drupal security team and the former lead of the team for over two years," Knaddison said. "So it's an area where we have a fair amount of expertise and depth, and we feel that our situation is best served by fixing vulnerabilities directly in the software itself."

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A Bundle of Tor

Filed under
OSS
Security
HowTos
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