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Security

NSA Shows Why We Should Abandon All Proprietary Software and Verify Trust

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Security

If Europe is serious about cyber security, then it should dump all proprietary software (back doors-friendly software) as soon as possible. Given everything we now know about the NSA, ignorance and uncertainty are no longer an excuse. A Dutch source has just revealed that the NSA cracked 50,000 computer networks. The evidence is overwhelming

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Is open source encryption the answer to NSA snooping?

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Security

The NSA had cracked Internet encryption.

The NSA was listening in to everything.

European customers were especially concerned, he says.

Fortunately, many of the headlines had been unnecessarily alarmist.

“The earlier types of encryption, with 64 bits or less, the NSA has figured out how to brute force decrypt at least some of that traffic,” he says. “But the more modern, strong encryption, with 128 or 256 encryption units, they can't decrypt that. And it bothers them no end.”

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Symantec Reveals that Cybercriminals Employ New Linux Trojan to Embezzle Data

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Linux
Security

Security researchers of well-known security firm 'Symantec' have identified a cyber-criminal operation which relies on a new-fangled Linux backdoor, nicknamed Linux.Fokirtor, to embezzle data without being discovered.

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Hacked by the NSA

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Security

There is little doubt that the NSA’s activities will have a negative effect on the U.S. tech sector. Some countries are already considering mandating that business servers be located in-country in an attempt to thwart intrusions by the agency. The Swiss are taking a further step and have hopes of profiting from their strong privacy laws with “Swiss Cloud,” a cloud service being developed with security in mind by Swisscom, in which the Swiss government has a majority stake.

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Linux in Government and Why There is Still NSA Agenda to Keep Wary Eye on

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Security

Even as Linux advocates we should recognise that there is a diversity of interests and the agenda of the NSA is to spy on everything and everyone, not to protect our privacy and security.

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Mozilla's web security guru talks open source

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Security

Mozilla is about more than just web browsers

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Trusting Trust and Trusting Red Hat et al.

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Security

With all sorts of National Security Letters, gag orders, oppressive laws like PARTIOT Act etc. we just know that those based in the US can be forced to facilitate surveillance (without ever speaking about it publicly).

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Report: NSA has little success cracking Tor

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Security

computerworld.com: The agency has attacked other software, including Firefox, in order to compromise the anonymity tool, according to documents

Linux is more secure but not invulnerable

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Linux
Security

techrepublic.com: Jack Wallen believes Linux is more secure than other platforms, but it's only as secure as the packages installed.

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Android Leftovers

Canonical Extends Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Linux Support to 10 Years

BERLIN — In a keynote at the OpenStack Summit here, Mark Shuttleworth, founder and CEO of Canonical Inc and Ubuntu, detailed the progress made by his Linux distribution in the cloud and announced new extended support. The Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Long Term Support) debuted back on April 26, providing new server and cloud capabilities. An LTS release comes with five year of support, but during his keynote Shuttleworth announced that 18.04 would have support that is available for up to 10 years. "I'm delighted to announce that Ubuntu 18.04 will be supported for a full 10 years," Shuttleworth said. "In part because of the very long time horizons in some of industries like financial services and telecommunications but also from IOT where manufacturing lines for example are being deployed that will be in production for at least a decade ." Read more

Benchmarking Packet.com's Bare Metal Intel Xeon / AMD EPYC Cloud

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